Catalogue


Tudor translation /
edited by Fred Schurink.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
xi, 234 p.
ISBN
0230271804 (hardback), 9780230271807 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230271804 (hardback)
9780230271807 (hardback)
catalogue key
8355778
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-217) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'A revived interest in the history, theory and practice of translation is a central feature of English Renaissance studies today. Schurink has assembled an impressive group of sixteenth-century literary scholars for this book and it will do much to develop our understanding of the broader cultural impact of translation in the period. It will be warmly welcomed.' - Neil Rhodes, University of St Andrews, UK
'A revived interest in the history, theory and practice of translation is a central feature of English Renaissance studies today. Schurink has assembled an impressive group of sixteenth-century literary scholars for this book and it will do much to develop our understanding of the broader cultural impact of translation in the period. It will be warmly welcomed.' - Neil Rhodes, University of St Andrews, UK 'Tudor Translation shows that we need a cultural analysis of translation as a common European phenomenon that can combine different national perspectives with the diversity of Europe's intellectual, political, social, and religious life. In so doing, the volume itself makes a contribution to the task of mapping more comprehensively the early modern exchange economy which translation fosters and channels.' -Translation and Literature 'Coherently organized and carefully edited, Tudor Translation achieves its double purpose of contextualizing translation and offering new insights on the literary activity of the period.' - Renaissance Quarterly 'Not only does Tudor Translation illustrate how the target culture rightfully possesses the source text, inscribing it with its own meanings and interests, but it also emphasizes England's dynamic cultural interaction with both continental Europe and classical antiquity throughout the sixteenth century. Thomas Paynell's favourite terms to describe his translations... 'fruitful' and 'profitable'... can certainly be used to recommend Tudor Translation to readers interested in literature, history, and translation studies.' - The Modern Language Review
"Coherently organized and carefully edited, Tudor Translation achieves its double purpose of contextualizing translation and offering new insights on the literary activity of the period. It should be of interest to advanced students and scholars in the fields of translation studies, translation history, and the history of English literature." - Renaissance Quarterly "Not only does Tudor Translation illustrate how the target culture rightfully possesses the source text, inscribing it with its own meanings and interests, but it also emphasizes England's dynamic cultural interaction with both continental Europe and classical antiquity throughout the sixteenth century.Thomas Paynell's favourite terms to describe his translations ('fruitful' and 'profitable' (p. 42)) can certainly be used to recommend Tudor Translation to readers interested in literature, history, and translation studies." - The Modern Language Review
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Summaries
Main Description
Leading scholars from both sides of the Atlantic explore translations as a key agent of change in the wider religious, cultural and literary developments of the early modern period, and restore translation to the centre of our understanding of the literature and history of Tudor England.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Leading scholars from both sides of the Atlantic explore translations as a key agent of change in the wider religious, cultural and literary developments of the early modern period. They restore translation to the centre of our understanding of the literature and history of Tudor England.
Description for Bookstore
Leading scholars from both sides of the Atlantic explore translations as a key agent of change in the wider religious, cultural and literary developments of the early modern period
Long Description
Translation was one of the most important and characteristic forms of writing of Tudor England. This volume draws attention to the key role played by translations in many areas of sixteenth-century culture and in particular its impact on three of the main cultural developments of the Tudor period: humanism, the Reformation, and the growth of a new literature in the vernacular. Highlighting the originality of translations both as literary works in their own right and as active responses to their historical circumstances, Tudor Translation offers provocative new perspectives on the intellectual, political, religious, and literary history of early modern England. Written by leading scholars from the UK and North America, this volume restores translation to the heart of our understanding of Tudor England and makes a major contribution to the current revival of interest in early modern translation.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Multilingualism, Romance, and Language Pedagogy; Or, Why Were So Many Sentimental Romances Printed as Polyglot Texts?
Gathering Fruit: The Translations of Thomas Paynell
Translation, Reading, and Humanism in Tudor England: How Gabriel Harvey Read Cope's Livy
The Mid-Tudor Politics of Learned Translation from John Cheke to John Christopherson
Watson's Polybius (1568): A Case Study in Mid-Tudor Humanism and Historiography
Tudor Englishwomen's Translations of Continental Protestant Texts: The Interplay of Ideology and Historical Context
Edmund Spenser's Translations of Du Bellay in Jan van der Noot's Theatre for Voluptuous Worldlings(1569)
Edward Fairfax and the Translation of Vernacular Epic
Reading Du Bartas
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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