Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Jim and Jap Crow : a cultural history of 1940s interracial America /
Matthew M. Briones.
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2012.
description
xi, 285 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0691129487 (cloth : acid-free paper), 9780691129488 (cloth : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2012.
isbn
0691129487 (cloth : acid-free paper)
9780691129488 (cloth : acid-free paper)
catalogue key
8350838
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
" Matthew Briones is a creative and courageous thinker who explores uncharted terrain in American studies. This magisterial book confirms his elevated status in our new discourse on race, class, and empire in America. Cornel West, Princeton University "Briones's masterful biography of Charles Kikuchi gives us an intimate portrait of how one Japanese American's firsthand encounters with discrimination during and after World War II transformed him into an enlightened citizen who envisioned a nation and world unbound by racial prejudice. Jim and Jap Crow is a profound meditation on race in American society."--Lane Ryo Hirabayashi, University of California, Los Angeles "Matthew Briones has given us an account of a lost democratic moment in our history, when marginal men and outsiders of various backgrounds dared to imagine an America beyond racial segregation and exclusion. Sophisticated, rigorous, and deeply humane, Jim and Jap Crow is a fresh consideration of American politics in the middle decades of the twentieth century."--Mae Ngai, Columbia University "A cartographer of social interstices, Matthew Briones illuminates the racial borderlands of 1940s America. His guide is the irrepressible Charles Kikuchi, who is apart from and a part of the upheavals of the decade and a perceptive observer in the tradition of Tocqueville. This careful history opens vistas onto a multicultural America on the cusp of dramatic change."--Gordon H. Chang, Stanford University "Fascinating and analytically sharp. Briones gives us a unique window into Asian American history, but it is not a transparent one, thankfully. Rather, he shows us the interactions that complicate any simple narration of what it was like to be Japanese American in the mid-twentieth century, and exposes critical contradictions in our notions of liberal democracy and American national ideology. Jim and Jap Crow is really a wonderful book."--David Palumbo-Liu, Stanford University
Flap Copy
"Matthew Briones is a creative and courageous thinker who explores uncharted terrain in American studies. This magisterial book confirms his elevated status in our new discourse on race, class, and empire in America."-- Cornel West, Princeton University "Brioness masterful biography of Charles Kikuchi gives us an intimate portrait of how one Japanese Americans firsthand encounters with discrimination during and after World War II transformed him into an enlightened citizen who envisioned a nation and world unbound by racial prejudice. Jim and Jap Crow is a profound meditation on race in American society."-- Lane Ryo Hirabayashi, University of California, Los Angeles "Matthew Briones has given us an account of a lost democratic moment in our history, when marginal men and outsiders of various backgrounds dared to imagine an America beyond racial segregation and exclusion. Sophisticated, rigorous, and deeply humane, Jim and Jap Crow is a fresh consideration of American politics in the middle decades of the twentieth century."-- Mae Ngai, Columbia University "A cartographer of social interstices, Matthew Briones illuminates the racial borderlands of 1940s America. His guide is the irrepressible Charles Kikuchi, who is apart from and a part of the upheavals of the decade and a perceptive observer in the tradition of Tocqueville. This careful history opens vistas onto a multicultural America on the cusp of dramatic change."-- Gordon H. Chang, Stanford University "Fascinating and analytically sharp. Briones gives us a unique window into Asian American history, but it is not a transparent one, thankfully. Rather, he shows us the interactions that complicate any simple narration of what it was like to be Japanese American in the mid-twentieth century, and exposes critical contradictions in our notions of liberal democracy and American national ideology. Jim and Jap Crow is really a wonderful book."-- David Palumbo-Liu, Stanford University
Flap Copy
"Matthew Briones is a creative and courageous thinker who explores uncharted terrain in American studies. This magisterial book confirms his elevated status in our new discourse on race, class, and empire in America."--Cornel West, Princeton University "Briones's masterful biography of Charles Kikuchi gives us an intimate portrait of how one Japanese American's firsthand encounters with discrimination during and after World War II transformed him into an enlightened citizen who envisioned a nation and world unbound by racial prejudice. Jim and Jap Crow is a profound meditation on race in American society."--Lane Ryo Hirabayashi, University of California, Los Angeles "Matthew Briones has given us an account of a lost democratic moment in our history, when marginal men and outsiders of various backgrounds dared to imagine an America beyond racial segregation and exclusion. Sophisticated, rigorous, and deeply humane, Jim and Jap Crow is a fresh consideration of American politics in the middle decades of the twentieth century."--Mae Ngai, Columbia University "A cartographer of social interstices, Matthew Briones illuminates the racial borderlands of 1940s America. His guide is the irrepressible Charles Kikuchi, who is apart from and a part of the upheavals of the decade and a perceptive observer in the tradition of Tocqueville. This careful history opens vistas onto a multicultural America on the cusp of dramatic change."--Gordon H. Chang, Stanford University "Fascinating and analytically sharp. Briones gives us a unique window into Asian American history, but it is not a transparent one, thankfully. Rather, he shows us the interactions that complicate any simple narration of what it was like to be Japanese American in the mid-twentieth century, and exposes critical contradictions in our notions of liberal democracy and American national ideology. Jim and Jap Crow is really a wonderful book."--David Palumbo-Liu, Stanford University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-10-01:
Briones (Univ. of Chicago) explores the meanings of race, democracy, and citizenship in the WW II era through the life and writings of Charles Kikuchi, a son of Japanese immigrants who was interned at Gila, Arizona, and relocated to Chicago's South Side. The author examines the 40-plus years of the Kikuchi diaries and revisits the Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study (JERS) to document Kikuchi's growing awareness of the parallels between Nisei and African American situations and his development of a racially inclusive definition of Americanism and to investigate the home front's "unprecedented level of interracial interactions." Kikuchi was but one of many writers and thinkers in the study who attempted to fashion a multiethnic and multiracial democracy. Of significant value is how Briones "maps" the intellectual discourses about interracialism and multiculturalism in what he terms the "Common Ground School," which included, among others, Louis Adamic, Carlos Bulosan, Carey McWilliams, Nisei intellectuals, and African American progressives. The study reveals a "remarkable web of interconnections" among activists, social scientists, and journalists in the 1940s who, like Kikuchi, found great promise in "unity within diversity." Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. A. Batch Widener University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title follows Kikuchi's personal odyssey among fellow Japanese American intellectuals, immigrant activists, Chicago School social scientists, everyday people on Chicago's South Side, and psychologically scarred veterans in the hospitals of New York. The book chronicles an important moment in America's history.
Main Description
Following Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, the U.S. government rounded up more than one hundred thousand Japanese Americans and sent them to internment camps. One of those internees was Charles Kikuchi. In thousands of diary pages, he documented his experiences in the camps, his resettlement in Chicago and drafting into the Army on the eve of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and his postwar life as a social worker in New York City. Kikuchi's diaries bear witness to a watershed era in American race relations, and expose both the promise and the hypocrisy of American democracy. Jim and Jap Crow follows Kikuchi's personal odyssey among fellow Japanese American intellectuals, immigrant activists, Chicago School social scientists, everyday people on Chicago's South Side, and psychologically scarred veterans in the hospitals of New York. The book chronicles a remarkable moment in America's history in which interracial alliances challenged the limits of the elusive democratic ideal, and in which the nation was forced to choose between civil liberty and the fearful politics of racial hysteria. It was an era of world war and the atomic bomb, desegregation in the military but Jim and Jap Crow elsewhere in America, and a hopeful progressivism that gave way to Cold War paranoia. Jim and Jap Crow looks at Kikuchi's life and diaries as a lens through which to observe the possibilities, failures, and key conversations in a dynamic multiracial America.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Preface: "Contraction and Release"p. xi
Introduction An Age of Possibilityp. 1
Before Pearl Harbor: Taking the Measure of a "Marginal" Manp. 18
"A Multitude of Complexes": Finding Common Ground with Louis Adamicp. 49
"Unity within Diversity": Intimacies and Public Discourses of Race and Ethnicityp. 74
"Participating and Observing": Dorothy Swaine Thomas, W. I Thomas and Jersp. 108
The Tanforan and Gila Diaries: Becoming Nikkeip. 136
From "Jap Crow" to "Jim and Jane Crow": Black and Blue (and Yellow) in Chicago and the Bay Areap. 162
"It Could Just as Well Be Me": Japanese American and African American GIs in the Army Diaryp. 192
Conclusion Tatsuro, "Standing Man"p. 218
Notesp. 237
Indexp. 263
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem