Catalogue


The European Reformation /
Euan Cameron.
edition
2nd ed.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
description
xviii, 616 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199547858 (Paper), 9780199547852 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
isbn
0199547858 (Paper)
9780199547852 (Paper)
general note
Previous ed.: 1991.
catalogue key
8349223
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'A new standard has been set with this one-volume survey of the Protestant Reformation, which should drive all others from the field. Cameron traces the movement from its late-medieval roots through the end of the sixteenth century with elegance, understanding, and a particularly impressivegift for lucid explanation. Perhaps the most significant aspect of this work is its documentation: ninety-odd pages of notes make the volume an extended historiographical essay in which the reader is guided toward the seminal scholarship on nearly every issue discussed in the text itself.Throughout, Cameron masterfully places the theological and intellectual developments of the sixteenth century within the broader context of social and political events.'Robert J. Bast, University of Arizona, The Catholic Historical Review, April 1993
'A new standard has been set with this one-volume survey of the Protestant Reformation, which should drive all others from the field. Cameron traces the movement from its late-medieval roots through the end of the sixteenth century with elegance, understanding, and a particularly impressivegift for lucid explanation. Perhaps the most significant aspect of this work is its documentation: ninety-odd pages of notes make the volume an extended historiographical essay in which the reader is guided toward the seminal scholarship on nearly every issue discussed in the text itself.Throughout, Cameron masterfully places the theological and intellectual developments of the sixteenth century within the broader context of social and political events ' --Robert J. Bast, University of Arizona, The Catholic Historical Review, April 1993
'If you have been looking for a serious textbook to assign in your Reformation course, look no further: Euan Cameron's The European Reformation should be the text of choice for a long time to come. Broadly conceived while filled with vivid detail ... guided by a personal view, bracinglywritten - there's hardly a dull sentence in over 400 pages ... a superb achievement. Only a leisurely reading will do justice to the book's many strengths ... those readers who have learned to relish the subtlety and complexity of historical events will find much to enjoy and, of course, a greatdeal to learn in Cameron's presentation.'Gerald Strauss, Indiana University, German History, Vol. 10, 1992
'If you have been looking for a serious textbook to assign in your Reformation course, look no further: Euan Cameron's The European Reformation should be the text of choice for a long time to come. Broadly conceived while filled with vivid detail ... guided by a personal view, bracinglywritten - there's hardly a dull sentence in over 400 pages ... a superb achievement. Only a leisurely reading will do justice to the book's many strengths ... those readers who have learned to relish the subtlety and complexity of historical events will find much to enjoy and, of course, a greatdeal to learn in Cameron's presentation. ' --Gerald Strauss, Indiana University, German History, Vol. 10, 1992
Review from other book by this author: 'Now the standard introduction to the Reformation in Germany ' --History Review
'To call Dr Cameron's new book a tour de force would amount to a serious understatement. The work has involved a massive marshalling of recent scholarship in all fields of Reformation history. A masterly survey of princely and aristocratic Reformations from the German homeland throughScandinavia, Poland, Hungary, England, Scotland and France ... with a sensitive study of the motivations of the powerful.'Michael Mullett, University of Lancaster, History Oct '92
'To call Dr Cameron's new book a tour de force would amount to a serious understatement. The work has involved a massive marshalling of recent scholarship in all fields of Reformation history. A masterly survey of princely and aristocratic Reformations from the German homeland throughScandinavia, Poland, Hungary, England, Scotland and France ... with a sensitive study of the motivations of the powerful ' --Michael Mullett, University of Lancaster, History, Oct '92
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is fully revised and updated version of Euan Cameron's authoritative account of the birth of the Protestant traditions in 16th-century Europe. It provides a clear and comprehensive narrative of these complex and many-stranded events.
Long Description
Since its first appearance in 1991, The European Reformation has offered a clear, integrated, and coherent analysis and explanation of how Christianity in Western and Central Europe from Iceland to Hungary, from the Baltic to the Pyrenees splintered into separate Protestant and Catholic identities and movements. Catholic Christianity at the end of the Middle Ages was not at all a uniformly 'decadent' or corrupt institution: it showed clear signs of cultural vigour and inventiveness. However, it was vulnerable to a particular kind of criticism, if ever its claims to mediate the grace of God to believers were challenged. Martin Luther proposed a radically new insight into how God forgives human sin. In this new theological vision, rituals did not 'purify' people; priests did not need to be set apart fromthe ordinary community; the church needed no longer to be an international body.For a critical 'Reformation moment', this idea caught fire in the spiritual, political, and community life of much of Europe. Lay people seized hold of the instruments of spiritual authority, and transformed religion into something simpler, more local, more rooted in their own community. So were born the many cultures, liturgies, musical traditions and prayer lives of the countries of Protestant Europe.This new edition embraces and responds to developments in scholarship over the past twenty years. Substantially re-written and updated, with both a thorough revision of the text and fully updated references and bibliography, it nevertheless preserves the distinctive features of the original, including its clearly thought-out integration of theological ideas and political cultures, helping to bridge the gap between theological and social history, and the use of helpful charts and tables thatmade the original so easy to use.
Main Description
Since its first appearance in 1991, The European Reformation has offered a clear, integrated, and coherent analysis and explanation of how Christianity in Western and Central Europe, from Iceland to Hungary, from the Baltic to the Pyrenees, splintered into separate Protestant and Catholic identities and movements. Catholic Christianity at the end of the Middle Ages was not at all a uniformly 'decadent' or corrupt institution: it showed clear signs of cultural vigour and inventiveness. However, it was vulnerable to a particular kind of criticism, if ever its claims to mediate the grace of God to believers were challenged. Martin Luther proposed a radically new insight into how God forgives human sin. In this new theological vision, rituals did not æpurify' people; priests did not need to be set apart from the ordinary community; the church needed no longer to be an international body. For a critical 'Reformation moment', this idea caught fire in the spiritual, political, and community life of much of Europe. Lay people seized hold of the instruments of spiritual authority, and transformed religion into something simpler, more local, more rooted in their own community. So were born the many cultures, liturgies, musical-traditions, and prayer lives of the countries of Protestant Europe. This new edition embraces and responds to developments in scholarship over the past twenty years. Substantially re-written and updated, with both a thorough revision of the text and fully updated references and bibliography, it nevertheless preserves the distinctive features of the original edition. It continues to offer a clearly thought-out integration of theological ideas and political cultures, helping to bridge the gap between theological and social history, and it deploys the same kinds of helpful charts and tables that made the original so easy to use. Book jacket.
Main Description
Since its first appearance in 1991, The European Reformation has offered a clear, integrated, and coherent analysis and explanation of how Christianity in Western and Central Europe from Iceland to Hungary, from the Baltic to the Pyrenees splintered into separate Protestant and Catholicidentities and movements. Catholic Christianity at the end of the Middle Ages was not at all a uniformly 'decadent' or corrupt institution: it showed clear signs of cultural vigour and inventiveness. However, it was vulnerable to a particular kind of criticism, if ever its claims to mediate the grace of God to believers werechallenged. Martin Luther proposed a radically new insight into how God forgives human sin. In this new theological vision, rituals did not 'purify' people; priests did not need to be set apart from the ordinary community; the church needed no longer to be an international body.For a critical 'Reformation moment', this idea caught fire in the spiritual, political, and community life of much of Europe. Lay people seized hold of the instruments of spiritual authority, and transformed religion into something simpler, more local, more rooted in their own community. So wereborn the many cultures, liturgies, musical traditions and prayer lives of the countries of Protestant Europe.This new edition embraces and responds to developments in scholarship over the past twenty years. Substantially re-written and updated, with both a thorough revision of the text and fully updated references and bibliography, it nevertheless preserves the distinctive features of the original,including its clearly thought-out integration of theological ideas and political cultures, helping to bridge the gap between theological and social history, and the use of helpful charts and tables that made the original so easy to use.
Main Description
Since its first appearance in 1991,The European Reformationhas offered a clear, integrated, and coherent analysis and explanation of how Christianity in Western and Central Europe from Iceland to Hungary, from the Baltic to the Pyrenees splintered into separate Protestant and Catholic identities and movements. Catholic Christianity at the end of the Middle Ages was not at all a uniformly 'decadent' or corrupt institution: it showed clear signs of cultural vigour and inventiveness. However, it was vulnerable to a particular kind of criticism, if ever its claims to mediate the grace of God to believers were challenged. Martin Luther proposed a radically new insight into how God forgives human sin. In this new theological vision, rituals did not 'purify' people; priests did not need to be set apart from the ordinary community; the church needed no longer to be an international body. For a critical 'Reformation moment', this idea caught fire in the spiritual, political, and community life of much of Europe. Lay people seized hold of the instruments of spiritual authority, and transformed religion into something simpler, more local, more rooted in their own community. So were born the many cultures, liturgies, musical traditions and prayer lives of the countries of Protestant Europe. This new edition embraces and responds to developments in scholarship over the past twenty years. Substantially re-written and updated, with both a thorough revision of the text and fully updated references and bibliography, it nevertheless preserves the distinctive features of the original, including its clearly thought-out integration of theological ideas and political cultures, helping to bridge the gap between theological and social history, and the use of helpful charts and tables that made the original so easy to use.
Main Description
Since its first appearance in 1991, The European Reformation has offered a clear, integrated and coherent analysis and explanation of how Christianity in Western and Central Europe from Iceland to Hungary, from the Baltic to the Pyrenees splintered into separate Protestant and Catholic identities and movements. This new edition embraces and responds to developments in scholarship over the past twenty years. Substantially re-writtenand updated, with both a thorough revision of the text and fully updated references and bibliography, it nevertheless preserves the distinctive features of the original, including its clearly thought-out integration of theological ideas and political cultures, helping to bridge the gap between theological and social history, and the use of helpful charts and tables that made the original so easy to use.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. xix
List of Mapsp. xix
Introduction: The Reformation and Europep. 1
The Background
The Religion of the People of Europep. 11
The Shared Religion of the Late Medieval Westp. 11
The Mass of the Peoplep. 17
The View from the Religious Elitesp. 21
The Vulnerability of the Churchp. 26
A Conflict of Responsibilitiesp. 27
Economic Problemsp. 30
Abuse of Priestly Statusp. 33
The 'Inflation' of Bureaucracyp. 35
The Personnel the Church Deserved?p. 37
'Reform' from within and its Limitsp. 44
Reform from above: A Lost Cause?p. 44
Piecemeal Reforms: The Papacy, the Religious Ordersp. 46
The 'Unreformable' Bishops and Secular Clergyp. 49
The Clichés of Reform: Ideals and Decayp. 51
Challenges from outside and their Limitsp. 54
Councils of the Church versus Popes?p. 54
Popes, Sovereigns, and 'National Churches'p. 56
The Laity against the Church?p. 60
A 'Lay Spirit' in Religion?p. 66
The Northern Renaissance and the Churchp. 69
Heresy: An Alternative Church?p. 75
The Hussite Movements in Bohemiap. 76
Popular Lay Heresiesp. 79
The Church and the Christian Soulp. 84
The Lifelong Cycle of Sin, Absolution, and Penancep. 84
Explaining How: Theologies of Justificationp. 88
The Church: Holy, Authoritative, Sacrificial?p. 92
Conclusion: A Precarious Equilibriump. 96
The Reformers and their Message
The 'Luther Affair' and its Contextp. 101
Martin Luther's Public Career, 1517-22p. 10I
Context and Catalystsp. 101
The Reformation Message Spreads and Diversifies: Switzerland and South Germanyp. 109
The Conversions of the Reformersp. 114
Martin Luther: Development and Influencesp. 114
The Non-Humanist Reformersp. 121
Humanist Reformers: Origins and Backgroundsp. 123
Humanist Reformers: Conversionsp. 125
Rejections of Reformp. 132
The Older Generationp. 132
Some Italian 'Evangelicals'p. 135
The Reformers' Message: Salvationp. 138
The Human Race, Sin, and the Lawp. 139
Faith, its Nature and Objectp. 144
Justificationp. 147
Regenerationp. 151
Predestinationp. 155
Conclusion: An Assault on the Penitential Cyclep. 159
The Reformers' Message: Scripturep. 163
The Church and Scripturep. 163
Reading and Understanding the Biblep. 166
The Reformers' Message: The Churchp. 172
The 'Community of the Faithful'p. 172
Sacrificing Priests to Preaching Ministersp. 175
Church and Statep. 179
The Reformers' Message: Sacramentsp. 183
Defining 'Sacraments'p. 184
Baptism: Seeking to Explain its Rolep. 186
The Communion: A Bone of Contentionp. 188
Rejecting the Restp. 194
Conclusion: A Novel and Destructive Challengep. 195
Establishing the Reformed Churches
Unsuccessful æAffiliations' to the Reformed Causep. 201
The Petty Nobility of Germanyp. 201
Communal Movements in Rural Germanyp. 204
Self-Governing Towns and Citiesp. 212
The Urban Reformation in Germanyp. 215
The Reformation of the Urban Cantons of Switzerlandp. 222
Introducing the New Ideas in the Citiesp. 229
The City Councils become Arbitersp. 236
The Political Pressures: Coup d'état, Consensus, or Compulsion?p. 242
Demolishing the Old Orderp. 249
Constructing the New Orderp. 255
Unsuccessful Civic Reformation Movementsp. 265
Principalities and Kingdomsp. 271
The German Princesp. 271
Kings, Nobles, and Bishops: The Scandinavian Kingdomsp. 274
Fragmented Kingdoms: Eastern-Central Europep. 279
Partial Reformation: England before 1559p. 283
Reformations Delayed: France and Scotland before 1559p. 290
Motives for Establishing the Reformation?p. 297
Wealth and Power?p. 298
Appeal to Classes or Social Structures?p. 304
Answering a Spiritual Need?p. 309
Conclusion: Reformed Preaching Honours Lay Participationp. 315
Beyond the 'Reformation Moment': From Temporary Coalitions to Growing Communities
Voluntary, Gathered Movements Reject the 'Coalition'p. 325
Radicals and Anabaptists to 1535p. 326
Restructuring and Survival, 1535-C.1600p. 332
New 'Heresies' in Eastern Europep. 336
Religious and Social Teachingp. 339
Crisis, Survival, and Compromise in Politicsp. 346
German Politics to 1555p. 346
Political Theory: From Non-Resistance to Godly Rebellionp. 358
Teaching by Example: Martyrs and Warriors of the Gospelp. 365
Reformers at Odds: The 'Confessional' Reformationp. 370
Lutheran Controversies, c.1540-c.1580p. 370
Germany's 'Confessional' Movement, c. 1560-1600p. 376
Religion and Revolt: France and the Low Countriesp. 382
The British Kingdoms, 1559-1603p. 391
Reformers and Laypeople: Building a Religious Culturep. 402
Protestant Ministers Become a 'Profession'p. 403
Instilling Correct Doctrinep. 409
New Standards of 'Piety' and 'Godliness'p. 414
The Reformation's Ambiguous Relationship with 'Popular Culture'p. 421
Laypeople's Responsesp. 429
Conclusionp. 436
Abbreviations Used in the Notesp. 442
Notesp. 447
Suggestions for Further Readingp. 554
Indexp. 585
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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