Catalogue


Organized crime, political transitions, and state formation in post-Soviet Eurasia /
Alexander Kupatadze.
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xi, 256 p.
ISBN
0230299806 (hbk : alk. paper), 9780230299801 (hbk : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
0230299806 (hbk : alk. paper)
9780230299801 (hbk : alk. paper)
contents note
List of charts and tables -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Political-criminal nexus and patterns of dominance -- Impact of Soviet and post-Soviet organized crime -- Ukraine : privatisation and re-privatisation : from shadowy takeovers to corporate raiding -- Georgia : extortion : from professional criminals to the "revolutionary government" -- Kyrgyzstan : drug trafficking : from sportsmeny and ugalovniki to police and elites -- The coloured revolutions and their consequences -- Organized crime, transitions, and state formation -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Index.
catalogue key
8348948
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 210-248) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Alexander Kupaladze is a scholar with many years of experience in studying organized crime and corruption issues in post-Soviet Eurasia. He obtained his PhD in International Relations from the University of St Andrews, UK, and has held teaching and research positions at the Transnational Crime and Corruption Center (TraCCC), Georgian Institute of Public Affairs in Tbilisi, Georgia, OSCE academy of Central Asia in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, and Elliott School of International Affairs of George Washington University, USA.
Summaries
Main Description
Based on over 130 interviews with criminals, law enforcement officials and government representatives from post-Soviet Georgia, Ukraine and Kyrgyzstan, this book situates organized crime in the debate on state formation and examines the diverging patterns in organized crime following the aftermath of these countries' Coloured Revolutions.
Long Description
For this innovative study, the first situating organized crime in the debate on state formation, Alexander Kupatadze interviewed over one hundred respondents including criminals, law enforcement officials, and politicians in post-Soviet Georgia, Ukraine and Kyrgyzstan to map the divergent patterns of organized crime in these countries following their Coloured Revolutions. Drawing upon unique case studies of criminal activity, the author traces the thin line dividing the licit and illicit spheres, or 'upper' and 'under' economic and political worlds. Kupatadze argues that state formation in post-Soviet Eurasia has been heavily marked by struggle for the dominance between political elites and organized crime groups that involved various forms of contention and collaboration. In reassessing the nature of state criminalization, Kupatadze introduces three dimensions of the state that determine the patterns of dominance: political-coercive, economic-taxation and ideological-informational. He distills the variables surrounding organized crime into contextual (geography, regional wars) and intermediate (related with the Coloured Revolutions such as participation of civil society, resources of competing political groups). This work is an important contribution to the study of organized criminality and state formation.
Description for Bookstore
This book situates organized crime in relation to state formation and examines diverging patterns in organized crime in post-Soviet secession states
Long Description
For this groundbreaking study, the first situating organized crime in the debate on state formation, Alexander Kupatadze interviewed over one hundred respondents including criminals, law enforcement officials, and politicians in post-Soviet Georgia, Ukraine and Kyrgyzstan to map the divergent patterns of organized crime in these countries following their Coloured Revolutions. Drawing upon unique case studies of criminal activity, the author traces the thin line dividing the licit and illicit spheres, or 'upper' and 'under' economic and political worlds. Kupatadze argues that state formation in post-Soviet Eurasia has been heavily marked by struggle for the dominance between political elites and organized crime groups that involved various forms of contention and collaboration. In reassessing the nature of state criminalization, Kupatadze introduces three dimensions of the state that determine the patterns of dominance: political-coercive, economic-taxation and ideological-informational. He distills the variables surrounding organized crime into contextual (geography, regional wars) and intermediate (related with the Coloured Revolutions such as participation of civil society, resources of competing political groups). This work is an important contribution to the study of organized criminality and state formation.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Based on over 130 interviews with criminals, law enforcement officials and government representatives from post-Soviet Georgia, Ukraine and Kyrgyzstan, this text situates organized crime in the debate on state formation and examines the diverging patterns in organized crime.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. viii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
The Political-Criminal Nexus and Patterns of Dominancep. 26
Impact of Soviet and Post-Soviet Organized Crimep. 46
Ukraine - Privatization and Re-privatization: From Shadowy Takeovers to Corporate Raidingp. 90
Georgia - Extortion: From Professional Criminals to the æRevolutionary Government'p. 116
Kyrgyzstan - Drug Trafficking: From Sportsmeny and Ugalovniki to Police and Elitesp. 140
The Coloured Revolutions and Their Consequencesp. 153
Organized Crime, Political Transitions and State Formationp. 181
Conclusionp. 194
Notesp. 196
Bibliographyp. 210
Indexp. 249
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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