Catalogue

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Atlantic worlds in the long eighteenth century : seduction and sentiment /
edited by Toni Bowers and Tita Chico.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
vi, 273 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230108679 (hardback), 9780230108677 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
0230108679 (hardback)
9780230108677 (hardback)
abstract
"Innovative and multidisciplinary, this collection of essays marks out the future of Atlantic Studies, making visible the emphases and purposes now emerging within this vital comparative field. The contributors model new ways to understand the unexpected roles that seduction stories and sentimental narratives played for readers struggling to understand and negotiate previously unimagined manifestations of difference between and among people, institutions, and ideas"--
catalogue key
8348718
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [239]-263) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Toni Bowers is a professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, where she was the co-founder of the Atlantic Studies Seminar. She is the author of Force or Fraud: British Seduction Stories and the Problem of Resistance; The Politics of Motherhood: British Literature and Culture, 1680-1760; and more than thirty articles and reviews in scholarly journals. Tita Chico is an associate professor of English at the University of Maryland. She is the author of Designing Women: The Dressing Room in Eighteenth-Century English Literature and Culture and the editor of The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-09-01:
Bowers (Univ. of Pennsylvania) and Chico (Univ. of Maryland) assemble and introduce a thought-provoking collection of scholarship on the long 18th century. The essays are wide-ranging, and the titular umbrella that covers them is correspondingly large, but this breadth is a strength rather than a weakness. The scholarship is uniformly good, and an eclectic group of essays on a broad topic is preferable to an uneven-because-overspecialized collection. Notable in the collection: Jayne Elizabeth Lewis on Henry Fielding and the changed perception of witchcraft--scary in the 16th and 17th centuries and idle superstition in the early 18th, witchcraft was made sad and even sentimental by sensibility; Gideon Mailer and Karen Collis, who argue for Susanna Rowson's authorial claim on the literary conventions of evangelical narrative, as against aesthetic appeals; Melissa Sanchez showing how Andrew Marvell highlights lesbian and other queer sexualities to demonstrate the loss of liberty inherent in the ideal of domestic masculinity. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. G. Shivel University of Miami
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Bowers (Univ. of Pennsylvania) and Chico (Univ. of Maryland) assemble and introduce a thought-provoking collection of scholarship on the long 18th century. The essays are wide-ranging, and the titular umbrella that covers them is correspondingly large, but this breadth is a strength rather than a weakness. The scholarship is uniformly good, and an eclectic group of essays on a broad topic is preferable to an uneven-because-overspecialized collection. Notable in the collection: Jayne Elizabeth Lewis on Henry Fielding and the changed perception of witchcraft - scary in the 16th and 17th centuries and idle superstition in the early 18th, witchcraft was made sad and even sentimental by sensibility; Gideon Mailer and Karen Collis, who argue for Susanna Rowson's authorial claim on the literary conventions of evangelical narrative, as against aesthetic appeals; Melissa Sanchez showing how Andrew Marvell highlights lesbian and other queer sexualities to demonstrate the loss of liberty inherent in the ideal of domestic masculinity. Summing Up: Recommended." - Choice 'In this invaluable collection, each essay demonstrates how rich yet diverse was the literature of the seventeenth and eighteenth-century circum-Atlantic world. Together these essays bring to light the twin issues of seduction and sentiment as the obsessive concern of novels, travel accounts, historical narratives, gossip, history, newspaper reports, and theatrical productions, to name only a few of the many genres discussed. Challenging the old Atlantic narratives, this collection for the first time opens the question as to why the Atlantic world should have been the unique site where seduction and sentiment came together both in shaping the New World and in remapping the social geography of the Old.' - Len Tennenhouse, Duke University 'This collection of essays is a valuable contribution to the burgeoning field of Atlantic Studies, confirming imaginative literature's central role in the ongoing project of rethinking nation-based cultural history. Collectively, these essays challenge traditional disciplinary boundaries defined by the nation-state, moving beyond rubrics such as 'early American literature,' to explore the ways in which these narratives of sentiment, seduction, and adultery were appropriated as they traversed geographical regions, were repackaged in various genres, and adapted to and repurposed within local contexts of the north Atlantic world.' - Beth Tobin, University of Georgia
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
.
Long Description
Innovative and multidisciplinary, this collection of essays marks out the future of Atlantic Studies, making visible the emphases and purposes now emerging within this vital comparative field. The contributors model new ways to understand the unexpected roles that seduction stories and sentimental narratives played for readers struggling to negotiate previously unimagined differences between and among people, institutions, and ideas.
Library of Congress Summary
"Innovative and multidisciplinary, this collection of essays marks out the future of Atlantic Studies, making visible the emphases and purposes now emerging within this vital comparative field. The contributors model new ways to understand the unexpected roles that seduction stories and sentimental narratives played for readers struggling to understand and negotiate previously unimagined manifestations of difference between and among people, institutions, and ideas"--
Main Description
In the decades between the late seventeenth and the early nineteenth centuries, the Atlantic Ocean was the setting for unprecedented movement, suffering, expectation, risk dread, and desire. In thirteen new essays by leading scholars, this book vividly demonstrates how imaginative writing served urgent social, creedal, and ideological imperatives across locations and among persons radically and unalterably redefined by their relations to the Atlantic. Tales of seduction and sentiment mingled and did much to shape contemporary writersÆ and readersÆ understandings of the expanding, continuously reoriented worlds they inhabited. A state-of-the field introduction places the essays in the context of recent Atlantic scholarship and challenges the perpetuation of disciplinary boundaries that have limited scholarsÆ imaginative engagements with the past. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introduction Atlantic Worlds in the Long Eighteenth Century: Seduction and Sentimentp. 1
Scandal and the Fate of Dreams
Adulterous Sentiments in Transatlantic Domestic Fiction, c. 1770-1805p. 17
Genuine Sentiments and Gendered Liberties: Migration and Marriage in Gilbert Imlay's The Emigrantsp. 33
"Heaven defend us from such fathers": Perez Morton and the Politics of Seductionp. 49
Charlotte: A Tale of Truth, A Premonition of American Revolutionsp. 55
Acts of Belonging and Renunciation
"She Straightness on the "Woods Bestows": Protestant Sexuality and English Empire in Marvells "Upon Appleton House"p. 31
"Spare his life to save his soul": Enthralled Lovers and Heathen Converts in "The Four Indian Kings Garland"p. 97
"O my ducats, O my daughter": Seductions and Sentimental Conversions of Jewish Female Characters in the Early American Theaterp. 115
Beware the Abandoned Woman: European Travelers, "Exceptional" Native "Women, and Interracial Families in Early Modern Atlantic Traveloguesp. 135
Bodies of Knowledge and Doubt
Bewitched: The Journal of a Voyage to Lisbon and the Seduction of Sentimentp. 151
The Boudoir in Philosophy, or Knowing Bodies in French Fictionp. 171
Seduction, Juvenile Death Literature, and Phillis Wheadey s Child Elegiesp. 189
Seduced by the Self: Susanna Rowson, Moral Sense Philosophy, and Evangelicalismp. 205
The Americanization of Gothic in Brockden Browns Wielandp. 221
List of Contributorsp. 235
Bibliographyp. 239
Indexp. 265
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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