Catalogue


Master & madman : the surprising rise and disastrous fall of the Honourable Anthony Lockwood, RN /
Peter Thomas and Nicholas Tracy.
imprint
Fredericton, NB : Goose Lane Editions, 2012.
description
xvi, 272 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0864926677 (cloth), 9780864926678 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Fredericton, NB : Goose Lane Editions, 2012.
isbn
0864926677 (cloth)
9780864926678 (cloth)
catalogue key
8348660
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 245-262) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
On June 1, 1823, the Honourable Anthony Lockwood, a member of New Brunswick’s Executive Council, dictated a proclamation in Fredericton's public square. He then took to his horse, galloped through the streets, and, brandishing a pair of sawn-off pistols, declared that he was overthrowing the government. Lockwood's one-man coup d'etat failed. Arrested by the High Sheriff, he was jailed and later declared mad. Officially removed from office in November 1825, he fled home to England. But who was Anthony Lockwood? Much of his story has been lost - in fact, Lockwood himself destroyed many of the records. Forced into the British Navy off of a slave ship, he rose to the rank of Master. He was commended for bravery in action against the French; shipwrecked and imprisoned in France; appointed master attendant of the naval yard at Bridgetown, Barbados, during the year the slave trade was abolished; and served as a hydrographer in the English Channel and the West Indies. In 1814 he began a marine survey of Nova Scotia and the Bay of Fundy. Against all odds, he managed to finesse a treasury appointment as Surveyor General of New Brunswick. Despite being out of step with polite Loyalist society, he threw himself into the job of developing the province and settling its immigrants, becoming the right-hand man of the Lieutenant-Governor, General George Stracey Smyth. He lost it all on that summer day in 1823. Here for the first time is the spectacular story of that astonishing rise and tumultuous fall.
Flap Copy
On June 1, 1823, the Honourable Anthony Lockwood, a member of New Brunswick's Executive Council, dictated a proclamation in Fredericton's public square. He then took to his horse, galloped through the streets, and, brandishing a pair of sawn-off pistols, declared that he was overthrowing the government. Lockwood's one-man coup d'etat failed. Arrested by the High Sheriff, he was jailed and later declared mad. Officially removed from office in November 1825, he fled home to England. But who was Anthony Lockwood? Much of his story has been lost - in fact, Lockwood himself destroyed many of the records. Forced into the British Navy off of a slave ship, he rose to the rank of Master. He was commended for bravery in action against the French; shipwrecked and imprisoned in France; appointed master attendant of the naval yard at Bridgetown, Barbados, during the year the slave trade was abolished; and served as a hydrographer in the English Channel and the West Indies. In 1814 he began a marine survey of Nova Scotia and the Bay of Fundy. Against all odds, he managed to finesse a treasury appointment as Surveyor General of New Brunswick. Despite being out of step with polite Loyalist society, he threw himself into the job of developing the province and settling its immigrants, becoming the right-hand man of the Lieutenant-Governor, General George Stracey Smyth. He lost it all on that summer day in 1823. Here for the first time is the spectacular story of that astonishing rise and tumultuous fall.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The authors . . . convincingly argue, in this intriguing look at a little-known corner of Canadian history, that Lockwood's grand gesture on that spring day in 1823 was "both mad and meaningful."" - Macleans
"intriguing look at a little-known corner of Canadian history." - Brian Bethune, Macleans
This item was reviewed in:
Quill & Quire, June 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The epic story of Anthony Lockwood, a British sailor turned insurrectionist, caught up in the events of war, revolution and unprecedented social change on both sides of the Atlantic. Book jacket.
Long Description
Despite the coming social reforms undertaken at home, the world of the Georgian British Empire was nothing if not class-conscious and leery of outsiders. But Anthony Lockwood, with no known certain record of his parentage and whose first appearance in history is his signing onto the USS Iphigenia in Jamaica in 1795, certainly broke through this mould. His naval record almost exactly spanned the French wars and the War of 1812, and he was commended for bravery in action against the French, was present at the Spithead Mutiny, shipwrecked and imprisoned in France, appointed master attendant of the naval yard in Bridgetown Barbados, and served as an hydrographer in the English Channel and the West Indies before beginning a three-year marine survey of Nova Scotia and the Bay of Fundy. All of this certainly seems eventful enough, but he was just getting started. Despite being an "outsider", Lockwood was able, due to his experience in the Navy, to acquire an appointment as the Surveyor General of New Brunswick and become the right-hand man to Governor George Stracey Smyth. Also appointed as Receiver General, his rise to the top of society seemed all but assured - despite the "handicap" of his low birth. But was he accepted or only tolerated by the aristocratic high New Brunswick society? On June 1, 1823, after several days of confronting authorities, picking fist fights, and riding from one side of the province to another, Lockwood took to his horse, brandished two pistols, and declared that he was taking over the government. This one-man coup d'etat failed, and he was declared mad. Jailed and later placed under house arrest, it would be November 1825 before he was officially removed from office and went home to England, where he spent much of the rest of his life in and out of asylums. With his own destruction of many of his records as well as the loss of more to a shipwreck and a fire, the story of Anthony Lockwood was a difficult one to research. With an exhaustive bibliography and notes, here, for the first time, is the bizarre, true story of Lockwood's almost unprecedented rise and disastrous fall.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
List of illustrationsp. ix
Introductionp. xiii
Lockwood, Master RNp. 1
Dead Man's Cloathsp. 3
A Saucy Young Puppyp. 18
Equal to the Taskp. 39
An Emissary of Lightp. 58
To Londonp. 78
The Honourable Anthony Lockwoodp. 93
King's Councillorp. 95
Surveyor Generalp. 111
A New Broomp. 126
A Man of Respectable Appearancep. 148
Noises Off - Loyal Dancingp. 156
The Fallp. 175
A House of Brickp. 177
The Perfect Stormp. 190
Never to Hope Againp. 206
Reflections: The Theatre of Lifep. 217
Referencesp. 221
Bibliographyp. 245
Indexp. 263
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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