Catalogue


Liberty is dead : a Canadian in Germany, 1938 /
[Franklin W. Wegenast] ; Margaret E. Derry, editor.
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c2012.
description
xiii, 156 p. : ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9781554580538
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c2012.
isbn
9781554580538
catalogue key
8348207
 
Also issued in electronic format.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 147-148) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Margaret E. Derry is a historian, artist, and livestock breeder. She writes about the history of agricultural breeding and has also written about the history of Georgian Bay. Her work on the Wegenast papers has taken her into the field of German history.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In the spring and summer of 1938, a third-generation German Canadian took an unforgettable road trip in Europe. Franklin Wellington Wegenast's diaries and letters from that journey corroborate modern assessments of German thinking and provide an insightful commentary on the brewing conflict.
Main Description
In the spring and summer of 1938, a third-generation German Canadian took an unforgettable road trip in Europe. Franklin Wellington Wegenast drove through Austria, Italy, France, Luxembourg, and Germany. He stopped to talk to people along the way and offered rides to those requesting them. He listened to what his passengers had to say about their lives, the conditions they lived under, and their views on what was happening in Europe. Wegenast heard Hitler speak in Innsbruck, and so witnessed first-hand Nazi power as Austria's independence crumbled. In his journal he noted &"the sheer animal force in the cries of the crowd&" and foresaw the &"collision course&" that was shaping up between the Germans who supported Hitler's ideology and the rest of the world. Wegenast was unable to publish the journal he kept on his journey, and at the time of his death in 1942 it was in an unorganised state. It is published here for the first time alongside commentary that puts the entries in the contexts of Wegenast's life experiences, the prevailing attitudes of the day, both in North America and Europe, and modern scholarship on Germany in the 1930s. The book includes correspondence Wegenast had with a young German for a few months after his return to Canada, correspondence that reveals even more clearly the intensity of his feelings and his fear for the future. Newly released government documents and diaries kept by Germans during the inter-war period have meant a considerable outpouring in recent years of material on German sentiment in the 1930s. Wegenast's diaries and letters corroborate modern assessments of German thinking and add insightful commentary, providing an outsider/insider view on the brewing conflict.
Main Description
In the spring and summer of 1938, a third-generation German Canadian took an unforgettable road trip in Europe. Franklin Wellington Wegenast drove through Austria, Italy, France, Luxembourg, and Germany. He stopped to talk to people along the way and offered rides to those requesting them. He listened to what his passengers had to say about their lives, the conditions they lived under, and their views on what was happening in Europe. Wegenast heard Hitler speak in Innsbruck, and so witnessed first-hand Nazi power as Austria's independence crumbled. In his journal he noted "the sheer animal force in the cries of the crowd" and foresaw the "collision course" that was shaping up between the Germans who supported Hitler's ideology and the rest of the world. Wegenast was unable to publish the journal he kept on his journey, and at the time of his death in 1942 it was in an unorganised state. It is published here for the first time alongside commentary that puts the entries in the contexts of Wegenast's life experiences, the prevailing attitudes of the day, both in North America and Europe, and modern scholarship on Germany in the 1930s. The book includes correspondence Wegenast had with a young German for a few months after his return to Canada, correspondence that reveals even more clearly the intensity of his feelings and his fear for the future. Newly released government documents and diaries kept by Germans during the inter-war period have meant a considerable outpouring in recent years of material on German sentiment in the 1930s. Wegenast's diaries and letters corroborate modern assessments of German thinking and add insightful commentary, providing an outsider/insider view on the brewing conflict.
Main Description
In the spring and summer of 1938, a third-generation German Canadian took an unforgettable road trip in Europe. Franklin Wellington Wegenast drove through Austria, Italy, France, Luxembourg, and Germany. He stopped to talk to people along the way and offered rides to those requesting them. He listened to what his passengers had to say about their lives, the conditions they lived under, and their views on what was happening in Europe. Wegenast heard Hitler speak in Innsbruck, and so witnessed first-hand Nazi power as Austria's independence crumbled. In his journal he noted "the sheer animal force in the cries of the crowd," and foresaw the "collision course" that was shaping up between the Germans who supported Hitler's ideology and the rest of the world. Wegenast was unable to publish the journal he kept on his journey, and at the time of his death in 1942 it was in an unorganized state. It is published here for the first time alongside commentary that puts the entries in the contexts of Wegenast's life experiences, the prevailing attitudes of the day, both in North America and Europe, and modern scholarship on Germany in the 1930s. The book includes correspondence Wegenast had with a young German for a few months after his return to Canada, correspondence that reveals even more clearly the intensity of his feelings and his fear for the future. Newly released government documents and diaries kept by Germans during the interwar period have meant a considerable outpouring in recent years of material on German sentiment in the 1930s. Wegenast's diaries and letters corroborate modern assessments of German thinking and add insightful commentary, providing an outsider/insider view on the brewing conflict.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. vii
Franklin Wellington Wegenast, 1876-1942p. 1
Newspaper Information in the 1930s on Germans and the German Situationp. 13
The Diaryp. 35
The Sigfrid Schmidt Filep. 109
Germans and Germany in 1938p. 123
Notesp. 137
Selected Bibliographyp. 147
Indexp. 149
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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