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Nominalism and its aftermath : the philosophy of Nelson Goodman /
by Dena Shottenkirk.
imprint
Dordrecht ; New York : Springer, c2009.
description
xiii, 171 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1402099304 (hbk.), 9781402099304 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Dordrecht ; New York : Springer, c2009.
isbn
1402099304 (hbk.)
9781402099304 (hbk.)
contents note
The metaphysics -- The basic problem -- Goodman's nominalism -- Consequences of Goodman's nominalism for his terminology -- The epistemology -- Twentieth century empiricism -- Constructionalism -- The effects of Goodman's nominalist constructionalism on his epistemology -- Influences on Goodman's philosophy -- The effects of Goodman's epistemology on his terminology/concepts -- The aesthetics -- Goodman's expression as reference -- Goodman's metaphorical exemplification -- Aesthetics as a branch of epistemology -- The effects of Goodman's nominalism and worldmaking on his aesthetics.
abstract
"Nelson Goodman's disparate writings are often written about only within their own particular discipline, such that the epistemology is discussed in contrast to others' epistemology, the aesthetics is contrasted with more traditional aesthetics, and the ontology and logic is viewed in contrast to both other contemporary philosophers and to Goodman's historical predecessors. This book argues that that is not an adequate way to view Goodman. The separate disciplines of ontology, epistemology, and aesthetics should be viewed as sequential steps within his thought, such that each provides the ground rules for the next section and, furthermore, providing the reasons for limitations on the terms available to the subsequent writing(s). This is true not merely because this is the general chronology of his writing, but more importantly because within his metaphysics lies Goodman's basic nominalist ontology and logic, and it is upon those principles that he builds his epistemology and, furthermore, it is the sum of both the metaphysics and the epistemology, with the nominalist principle as the guiding force, which constructs the aesthetics. At the end of each section of this book, the consequent limitations imposed on his terms and concepts available to him are explicated, such that, by the end of the book, the book delineates the constraints imposed upon the aesthetics by both the metaphysics and the epistemology."--P. [4] of cover.
catalogue key
8346635
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 163-168) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
From the reviews: "The author has given us the needed scholarly reference work on Goodman. Goodman sought to replace psychology with semantics, and showed us how far we could travel in that direction. The trip was admirably designed and guided by his genius. In end, it was genius, and not the lack of it, that showed us that the philosophy of language and languages of art will lead us back to the hardest questions in the philosophy of mind." Keith Lehrer, Regents Professor of Philosophy, The University of Arizona "The central aim of Shottenkirk's book is then to present the different aspects but also the consistency and unity of Goodman's philosophy ... . Shottenkirk's book is ... a fine piece of Goodman scholarship, highlighting the philosopher's genius through a comprehensive, thorough and lucid analysis of his work. It will be valuable to the student but also the philosopher who wants to gain a good overview of Goodman's philosophy as well as grasp the numerous intricate links between the different aspects of his thought." (Katerina Bantinaki, Metascience, Vol. 20, 2011)
From the reviews: "The author has given us the needed scholarly reference work on Goodman. Goodman sought to replace psychology with semantics, and showed us how far we could travel in that direction. The trip was admirably designed and guided by his genius. In end, it was genius, and not the lack of it, that showed us that the philosophy of language and languages of art will lead us back to the hardest questions in the philosophy of mind." Keith Lehrer, Regents Professor of Philosophy, The University of Arizona The central aim of Shottenkirk's book is then to present the different aspects but also the consistency and unity of Goodman's philosophy … . Shottenkirk's book is … a fine piece of Goodman scholarship, highlighting the philosopher's genius through a comprehensive, thorough and lucid analysis of his work. It will be valuable to the student but also the philosopher who wants to gain a good overview of Goodman's philosophy as well as grasp the numerous intricate links between the different aspects of his thought. (Katerina Bantinaki, Metascience, Vol. 20, 2011)
From the reviews:"The author has given us the needed scholarly reference work on Goodman. Goodman sought to replace psychology with semantics, and showed us how far we could travel in that direction. The trip was admirably designed and guided by his genius. In end, it was genius, and not the lack of it, that showed us that the philosophy of language and languages of art will lead us back to the hardest questions in the philosophy of mind." Keith Lehrer, Regents Professor of Philosophy, The University of ArizonaThe central aim of Shottenkirk's book is then to present the different aspects but also the consistency and unity of Goodman's philosophy … . Shottenkirk's book is … a fine piece of Goodman scholarship, highlighting the philosopher's genius through a comprehensive, thorough and lucid analysis of his work. It will be valuable to the student but also the philosopher who wants to gain a good overview of Goodman's philosophy as well as grasp the numerous intricate links between the different aspects of his thought. (Katerina Bantinaki, Metascience, Vol. 20, 2011)
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Library of Congress Summary
"Nelson Goodman's disparate writings are often written about only within their own particular discipline, such that the epistemology is discussed in contrast to others' epistemology, the aesthetics is contrasted with more traditional aesthetics, and the ontology and logic is viewed in contrast to both other contemporary philosophers and to Goodman's historical predecessors. This book argues that that is not an adequate way to view Goodman. The separate disciplines of ontology, epistemology, and aesthetics should be viewed as sequential steps within his thought, such that each provides the ground rules for the next section and, furthermore, providing the reasons for limitations on the terms available to the subsequent writing(s). This is true not merely because this is the general chronology of his writing, but more importantly because within his metaphysics lies Goodman's basic nominalist ontology and logic, and it is upon those principles that he builds his epistemology and, furthermore, it is the sum of both the metaphysics and the epistemology, with the nominalist principle as the guiding force, which constructs the aesthetics. At the end of each section of this book, the consequent limitations imposed on his terms and concepts available to him are explicated, such that, by the end of the book, the book delineates the constraints imposed upon the aesthetics by both the metaphysics and the epistemology."--P. [4] of cover.
Main Description
Nelson Goodman's disparate writings are often written about only within their own particular discipline, such that the epistemology is discussed in contrast to others' epistemology, the aesthetics is contrasted with more traditional aesthetics, and the ontology and logic is viewed in contrast to both other contemporary philosophers and to Goodman's historical predecessors. This book argues that that is not an adequate way to view Goodman. The separate disciplines of ontology, epistemology, and aesthetics should be viewed as sequential steps within his thought, such that each provides the ground rules for the next section and, furthermore, providing the reasons for limitations on the terms available to the subsequent writing(s). This is true not merely because this is the general chronology of his writing, but more importantly because within his metaphysics lies Goodman's basic nominalist ontology and logic, and it is upon those principles that he builds his epistemology and, furthermore, it is the sum of both the metaphysics and the epistemology, with the nominalist principle as the guiding force, which constructs the aesthetics. At the end of each section of this book, the consequent limitations imposed on his terms and concepts available to him are explicated, such that, by the end of the book, the book delineates the constraints imposed upon the aesthetics by both the metaphysics and the epistemology. This book will benefit not only the professionals in the field of philosophy, but will also help both graduate and upper level undergraduate students understand Goodman's disparate writings within their proper context, and hopefully will also encourage them to view philosophical thinking in a less truncated and departmentalized way.
Main Description
Nelson Goodman's disparate writings are often written about only within their own particular discipline, such that the epistemology is discussed in contrast to others' epistemology, the aesthetics is contrasted with more traditional aesthetics, and the ontology and logic is viewed in contrast to both other contemporary philosophers and to Goodman's historical predecessors. This book argues that that is not an adequate way to view Goodman. The separate disciplines of ontology, epistemology, and aesthetics should be viewed as sequential steps within his thought, such that each provides the ground rules for the next section and, furthermore, providing the reasons for limitations on the terms available to the subsequent writing(s). This is true not merely because this is the general chronology of his writing, but more importantly because within his metaphysics lies Goodman's basic nominalist ontology and logic, and it is upon those principles that he builds his epistemology and, furthermore, it is the sum of both the metaphysics and the epistemology, with the nominalist principle as the guiding force, which constructs the aesthetics. At the end of each section of this book, the consequent limitations imposed on his terms and concepts available to him are explicated, such that, by the end of the book, the book delineates the constraints imposed upon the aesthetics by both the metaphysics and the epistemology.This book will benefit not only the professionals in the field of philosophy, but will also help both graduate and upper level undergraduate students understand Goodman's disparate writings within their proper context, and hopefully will also encourage them to view philosophical thinking in a less truncated and departmentalized way.
Main Description
Synthese Library Nelson Goodman's disparate writings are often written about only within their own particular discipline, such that the epistemology is discussed in contrast to others' epistemology, the aesthetics is contrasted with more traditional aesthetics, and the ontology and logic is viewed in contrast to both other contemporary philosophers and to Goodman's historical predecessors. This book argues that that is not an adequate way to view Goodman. The separate disciplines of ontology, epistemology, and aesthetics should be viewed as sequential steps within his thought, such that each provides the ground rules for the next section and, furthermore, providing the reasons for limitations on the terms available to the subsequent writing(s). This is true not merely because this is the general chronology of his writing, but more importantly because within his metaphysics lies Goodman's basic nominalist ontology and logic, and it is upon those principles that he builds his epistemology and, furthermore, it is the sum of both the metaphysics and the epistemology, with the nominalist principle as the guiding force, which constructs the aesthetics. At the end of each section of this book, the consequent limitations imposed on his terms and concepts available to him are explicated, such that, by the end of the book, the book delineates the constraints imposed upon the aesthetics by both the metaphysics and the epistemology. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
The Metaphysics
The Basic Problemp. 3
General Termsp. 3
Universals: The Realistsp. 4
Particulars: The Nominalistsp. 4
The Twentieth Century Debatep. 6
Bertrand Russellp. 6
Willard Van Orman Quinep. 12
Goodman's Nominalismp. 19
Abstract Entitiesp. 19
Extensionalismp. 23
Individualsp. 26
Classesp. 33
Qualiap. 37
Propertiesp. 42
The Consequences of Goodman's Nominalism for his Terminologyp. 45
Introductionp. 45
No Propertiesp. 46
No Abstract Objectsp. 47
Reference not Meaningp. 50
No Classesp. 51
No Fictive Referencep. 54
The Epistemology
Twentieth Century Epistemologyp. 59
Introductionp. 59
Goodman Adopts the Postivists' Aversion to Metaphysicsp. 61
Goodman Rejects the Positivists' Sense Data and Their Phenomenal Realityp. 64
Goodman Rejects the Positivists' "The Given"p. 65
Goodman Adopts Semantics as Reference, not Meaningp. 66
Goodman Adopts the Rejection of the Analyticp. 67
Constructionalismp. 69
Adequacy Criterionp. 69
Extensional Isomorphismp. 73
Anti-Foundationalismp. 75
Coherentismp. 77
Relativized Referencep. 79
Relativized Constructionalismp. 80
The Effects of Goodman's Nominalist Constructionalism on his Epistemologyp. 83
Induction and Projection of Predicatesp. 83
Epistemological Relativismp. 86
Metaphysical Pluralism: Worldmakingp. 89
Truthp. 93
Influences on Goodman's Philosophyp. 97
Introductionp. 97
Kantp. 98
Berkeleyp. 100
Jamesp. 101
The Effects of Goodman's Epistemology on his Terminology/Conceptsp. 103
No Universal Truthsp. 103
No Natural Kindsp. 104
Cultural Relativismp. 105
Knowledge from Human Sensory Systems is Non-natural and Constructedp. 106
No Autonomous Objectp. 107
Object Does not Transmit Anything Other than what the Symbol System Determinesp. 108
The Aesthetics
Goodman's Expression as Referencep. 111
The Centrality of Referencep. 111
The Term "Expression"p. 112
Goodman on Representationp. 113
Goodman on Reference in Aestheticsp. 115
Goodman on Expressionp. 118
Goodman's Metaphorical Exemplificationp. 125
Possession and Exemplificationp. 125
Instantiation as Part of a Constructed Systemp. 128
A Different Extensionp. 131
Aesthetics as a Branch of Epistemologyp. 137
The Distinction Between Aesthetic and Non-aestheticp. 137
The Similarity Between Aesthetic and Non-aestheticp. 138
The Effects of Goodman's Nominalism and Worldmaking on his Aestheticsp. 143
Introductionp. 143
No Intensions/No Intentionsp. 143
No Propertiesp. 147
No Referencing of General Terms or Fictive Entitiesp. 148
No Non-semantic Meaningsp. 152
No Natural Symbolsp. 153
No Central Role for Emotionp. 154
No Relation to Universal Truthp. 157
Conclusionp. 158
Bibliographyp. 163
Indexp. 169
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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