Catalogue


The hierarchies of slavery in Santos, Brazil, 1822-1888 /
Ian Read.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, c2012.
description
xiv, 275 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0804774145 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9780804774147 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, c2012.
isbn
0804774145 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9780804774147 (hbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Masters and their slaves. Neighborhoods and inequality -- Material and demographic changes -- Slave markets and networks -- Slaves and their masters. Family, work, and punishment -- Illness, recovery, and death -- Pathways to freedom : manumission and flight -- "Manumissionists," abolitionists, and emancipation.
catalogue key
8336821
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 249-265) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-09-01:
Read's meticulous study of life in Santos, Brazil, is a remarkable reconstruction of local life that draws on a wide variety of data relative to slavery and the lives of slaves. The work is a dazzling display of social science methods deployed to grapple with a series of historical questions. Read (Latin American studies, Soka Univ. of America) documents work regimes, residential patterns, the demography of slave owners, and other factors relating to social differentiation. His success in fleshing out the details of these slippery topics is a significant accomplishment and also testimony to the maturity of the historiography on Brazilian slavery. Part 1, "Masters and Their Slaves," profiles the city's different neighborhoods on a street-by-street level, its changing demography, and the networks sketched by slave sales. In Part 2, "Slaves and Their Masters," Read examines domestic life, health care, manumission, and flight. The complexity of all of these subjects is increased as he must account for changes that occurred between the early days of the empire when Santos was a small city, and the moment prior to the final abolition of slavery, when the rail link with Sao Paulo transformed Santos into a booming international port. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. M. Rosenthal Western Connecticut State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book offers a unique perspective on slavery in nineteenth-century Brazil. As a work of historical demography that spans most of the nineteenth century, The Hierarchies of Slavery in Santos, Brazil, 1822-1888 is an ambitious study. It offers the most comprehensive view of a discrete, urban Brazilian slave population yet to be produced and is a very important contribution to the history of slavery, not only in Brazil but also in comparative perspective."--Linda Lewin, University of California, Berkeley
"Read's renewed focus on treatment exemplifies how historians can account for the harsh constraints slaves faced in Brazil, without resuscitating long-discredited myths of docile slaves. . . With compelling analysis of such details throughout, The Hierarchies of Slavery will interest scholars from a range of disciplines whose work confronts the complex, sometimes polarizing question of subaltern agency."John Lucian Smith, Colonial Latin American Historical Review
"This impressively and, indeed, massively researched study is the first to demonstrate, systematically and in depth, that how slaves exercised their agency often depended in part on who owned them and how they were employed. It is a pioneering work, standing out for its analysis of urban slavery from multiple angles and for its use of such a wide variety of sources."--B.J. Barickman, University of Arizona
"Read's meticulous study of life in Santos, Brazil, is a remarkable reconstruction of local life that draws on a wide variety of data relative to slavery and the lives of slaves. The work is a dazzling display of social science methods deployed to grapple with a series of historical questions . . . Highly recommended."J. M. Rosenthal, CHOICE
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2012
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Summaries
Main Description
Despite the inherent brutality of slavery, some slaves could find small but important opportunities to act decisively. The Hierarchies of Slavery explores such moments of opportunity and resistance in Santos, a Southeastern township in Imperial Brazil. It argues that slavery in Brazil was hierarchical: slaves' fleeting chances to form families, work jobs that would not kill or maim, avoid debilitating diseases, or find a (legal or illegal) pathway out of slavery were highly influenced by their demographic background and their owners' social position. By tracing the lives of slaves and owners through multiple records, the author is able to show that the cruelties that slaves faced were not equally shared. One important implication is that internal stratification likely helped perpetuate slavery because there was the belief, however illusionary, that escaping captivity was not necessary for social mobility.
Main Description
Despite the inherent brutality of slavery, some slaves could find small but important opportunities to act decisively. The Hierarchies of Slavery in Santos, Brazil, 1822-1888 explores such moments of opportunity and resistance in Santos, a Southeastern township in Imperial Brazil. It argues that slavery in Brazil was hierarchical: slaves' fleeting chances to form families, work jobs that would not kill or maim, avoid debilitating diseases, or find a (legal or illegal) pathway out of slavery were highly influenced by their demographic background and their owners' social position. By tracing the lives of slaves and owners through multiple records, the author is able to show that the cruelties that slaves faced were not equally shared. One important implication is that internal stratification likely helped perpetuate slavery because there was the belief, however illusionary, that escaping captivity was not necessary for social mobility.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. ix
List of Figuresp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
List of Abbreviationsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Masters and their Slaves
Neighborhoods and Inequalityp. 19
Material and Demographic Changesp. 43
Slave Markets and Networksp. 62
Slaves and their Masters
Family, Work, and Punishmentp. 93
Illness, Recovery, and Deathp. 125
Pathways to Freedom: Manumission and Flightp. 154
"Manumissionists," Abolitionists, and Emancipationp. 179
Conclusionp. 197
Appendixp. 209
Notesp. 213
Bibliographyp. 249
Indexp. 267
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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