Catalogue


God's instruments : political conduct in the England of Oliver Cromwell /
Blair Worden.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
description
xi, 421 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199570493 (hbk.), 9780199570492 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
isbn
0199570493 (hbk.)
9780199570492 (hbk.)
abstract
"The Puritan Revolution escaped the control of its creators. The parliamentarians who went to war with Charles I in 1642 did not want or expect the fundamental changes that would follow seven years later: the trial and execution of the king, the abolition of the House of Lords, and the creation of the only republic in English history. There were startling and unexpected developments, too, in religion and ideas: the spread of unorthodox doctrines; the attainment of a wide measure of liberty of conscience; new thinking about the moral and intellectual bases of politics and society. God's Instruments centres on the principal instrument of radical change, Oliver Cromwell, and on the unfamiliar landscape of the decade he dominated, from the abolition of the monarchy in 1649 to the return of the Stuart dynasty in 1660"--Jacket.
catalogue key
8322147
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
a coherence that sheds so much light on Cromwell's reign that it dazzles ... quite simply indispensable.
It is a collection which deserves to be and will be ... treasured, and revisited for its salutary and important wisdom.
'Literature and Politics in Cromwellian England is a marvellous contribution to the field. It will play a central role in all future discussions of Milton, Nedham and Marvell, and will be of fundamental importance to all those interested in the relationship between literature and politics inseventeenth-century England.' --Matthew Adams, Review of English Studies
"Literature and Politics in Cromwellian England is a marvellous contribution to the field. It will play a central role in all future discussions of Milton, Nedham and Marvell, and will be of fundamental importance to all those interested in the relationship between literature and politics inseventeenth-century England." --Matthew Adams, Review of English Studies
'Our understanding of Milton, Marvell and Nedham is quite simply transformed by Worden's brilliance as a reader of their texts and by his extraordinary ability to use their connections and divergences one with another and with a wider group of kindred spirits.' --John Morrill, BBC History Magazine
"Overall a superb book, one that touches on a range of scholarly interests including English history, the development of English universities, and the birth of liberty." --Sun News Network
Review from other book by this author:'...a work of immense richness and its implications will be debated for many years to come...what this book does, it does superbly well, and it will send scholars back to the sources with new questions and new answers.' --David Norbrook The Library
The essays have been carefully revised, a new introduction glues them together, and a meticulously comprehensive index makes for easy cross referencing. Much scholarship is paraded here ... insights and pithy verdicts abound. [Worden] writes in a gently argumentative way, engaging with other historians without being brutal or belittling.
The resulting vilume will of course be indispensible for fellow specialists; but it also offers a fine introduction, for the general reader, to some of the best modern historical thinking on the political and mental worlds of the Cromwellian era.
The resulting volume will of course be indispensable for fellow specialists; but it also offers a fine introduction, for the general reader, to some of the best modern historical thinking on the political and mental worlds of the Cromwellian era.
'Worden steers an intricate and assured course through these complex areas, guided by his remarkable knowledge... what emerges from the close analysis of Nedham's, Milton's and Marvell's political manoeuvrings is something quite radical.' --Colin Burrow, London Review of Books
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a detailed study of the religious and political character of the most revolutionary decade of English history, from the execution of Charles I in 1649 to the return of his son in 1660. It explores the minds and conduct of the dominant figure of the era, Oliver Cromwell, and his friends and enemies.
Long Description
The Puritan Revolution escaped the control of its creators. The parliamentarians who went to war with Charles I in 1642 did not want or expect the fundamental changes that would follow seven years later: the trial and execution of the king, the abolition of the House of Lords, and the creation of the only republic in English history. There were startling and unexpected developments, too, in religion and ideas: the spread of unorthodox doctrines; the attainment of a wide measure ofliberty of conscience; new thinking about the moral and intellectual bases of politics and society. God's Instruments centres on the principal instrument of radical change, Oliver Cromwell, and on the unfamiliar landscape of the decade he dominated, from the abolition of the monarchy in 1649 to thereturn of the Stuart dynasty in 1660. Its theme is the relationship between the beliefs or convictions of politicians and their decisions and actions. Blair Worden explores the biblical dimension of Puritan politics; the ways that a belief in the workings of divine providence affected political conduct; Cromwell's commitment to liberty of conscience and his search for godly reformation through educational reform; the constitutional premises of his rule and those of his opponents in the struggle for supremacy between parliamentaryand military rule; the relationship between conceptions of civil and religious liberty. The conflicts Worden reconstructs are placed in the perspective of long-term developments, of which historians have lost sight, in ideas about parliament and about freedom. The final chapters turn to the guidingconvictions of two writers at the heart of politics, John Milton and the royalist Edward Hyde, the future Earl of Clarendon. Material from previously published essays, much of it expanded and extensively revised, comes together with freshly written chapters.
Main Description
The Puritan Revolution escaped the control of its creators. The parliamentarians who went to war with Charles I in 1642 did not want or expect the fundamental changes that would follow seven years later: the trial and execution of the king, the abolition of the House of Lords, and the creationof the only republic in English history. There were startling and unexpected developments, too, in religion and ideas: the spread of unorthodox doctrines; the attainment of a wide measure of liberty of conscience; new thinking about the moral and intellectual bases of politics and society. God'sInstruments centres on the principal instrument of radical change, Oliver Cromwell, and on the unfamiliar landscape of the decade he dominated, from the abolition of the monarchy in 1649 to the return of the Stuart dynasty in 1660. Its theme is the relationship between the beliefs or convictions of politicians and their decisions and actions. Blair Worden explores the biblical dimension of Puritan politics; the ways that a belief in the workings of divine providence affected political conduct; Cromwell's commitment to libertyof conscience and his search for godly reformation through educational reform; the constitutional premises of his rule and those of his opponents in the struggle for supremacy between parliamentary and military rule; the relationship between conceptions of civil and religious liberty. The conflictsWorden reconstructs are placed in the perspective of long-term developments, of which historians have lost sight, in ideas about parliament and about freedom. The final chapters turn to the guiding convictions of two writers at the heart of politics, John Milton and the royalist Edward Hyde, thefuture Earl of Clarendon. Material from previously published essays, much of it expanded and extensively revised, comes together with freshly written chapters.
Table of Contents
A Note to the Readerp. viii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. x
Introductionp. 1
Cromwell and the Sin of Achanp. 13
Providence and Politicsp. 33
Toleration and the Protectoratep. 63
Politics, Piety, and Learning: Cromwellian Oxfordp. 91
Cromwell and his Councillorsp. 194
Cromwell and the Protectoratep. 230
Kingship, the Commonwealth, and Single Rulep. 260
Civil and Religious Libertyp. 313
John Milton: Life and Writingp. 355
Clarendon: History, Religion, Politicsp. 373
Indexp. 401
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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