Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Anna Letitia Barbauld and eighteenth-century visionary poetics /
Daniel P. Watkins.
imprint
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012.
description
xvi, 245 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1421404583 (hbk. : acid-free paper), 9781421404585 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012.
isbn
1421404583 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
9781421404585 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
contents note
Introduction -- Barbauld's Poems in context -- Politics, vision, and pastoral -- Satire, antipastoral, and visionary poetics -- Personal life and visionary poetics -- Reflections on writing -- The personal and biblical principles of poetic vision -- God, vision, and the political moment -- Conclusion.
catalogue key
8321817
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [223]-232) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Daniel P. Watkins is professor of English at Duquesne University and author of Sexual Power in British Romantic Poetry, A Materialist Critique of English Romantic Drama, and Social Relations in Byron's Eastern Tales.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-08-01:
Following the lead of Neil Fraistat (The Poem and the Book: Interpreting Collections of Romantic Poetry, 1985), Watkins (Duquesne Univ.) seeks to read Barbauld's Poems (1773; revised 1793) not just in terms of the poems individually, but as a series of works, in conversation with one another, that make a developing argument. There are problems with such a project. There is no testimony by Barbauld about why she ordered her poems as she did; so, just as in algebra there is an infinity of algorithms that can generate any given finite series of numbers, there are many reasons why Barbauld placed one poem before or after another. But in addition to reading the volume as a whole, Watkins reads individual poems for their visionary content (especially their commitment to a radical future of democratic equality and love). His readings are usually, if not always, persuasive (does it really make sense to argue that Barbauld turned a poem on slavery from blank verse into heroic couplets in order to reflect the restrictions placed on slaves?), and Watkins makes a solid case for treating Barbauld as a major poet. Summing Up: Recommended. With reservations. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. D. L. Patey Smith College
Reviews
Review Quotes
Watkins makes a solid case for treating Barbauld as a major poet.
Watkins makes an utterly convincing case for why Barbauld is so much more important as a poet and thinker than is typically appreciated, and why a close and systematic study of the complex volume Poems has so much to teach us.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this critical study of Anna Letitia Barbauld's major work, Daniel P. Watkins reveals the singular purpose of Barbauld's visionary poems: to recreate the world based on the values of liberty and justice.
Main Description
In this first critical study of Anna Letitia Barbauld's major work, Daniel P. Watkins reveals the singular purpose of Barbauld's visionary poems: to recreate the world based on the values of liberty and justice.
Main Description
In this first critical study of Anna Letitia Barbauld's major work, Daniel P. Watkins reveals the singular purpose of Barbauld's visionary poems: to recreate the world based on the values of liberty and justice. Watkins examines in close detail both the form and content of Barbauld's Poems, originally published in 1773 and revised and reissued in 1792. Along with careful readings of the poems that situate the works in their broader political, historical, and philosophical contexts, Watkins explores the relevance of the introductory epigraphs and the importance of the poems' placement throughout the volume. Centering his study on Barbauld's effort to develop a visionary poetic stance, Watkins argues that the deliberate arrangement of the poems creates a coherent portrayal of Barbauld's poetic, political, and social vision, a far-sighted sagacity born of her deep belief that the principles of love, sympathy, liberty, and pacifism are necessary for a secure and meaningful human reality. In tracing the contours of this effort, Watkins examines, in particular, the tension in Barbauld's poetry between her desire to engage directly with the political realities of the world and her equally strong longing for a pastoral world of peace and prosperity. Scholars of British literature and women writers will welcome this important study of one of the eighteenth century's foremost writers.
Main Description
In this first critical study of Anna Letitia Barbauld's major work, Daniel P. Watkins reveals the singular purpose of Barbauld's visionary poems: to recreate the world based on the values of liberty and justice. Watkins examines in close detail both the form and content of Barbauld's Poems , originally published in 1773 and revised and reissued in 1792. Along with providing careful readings of the poems, readings that situate the works in their broader political, historical, and philosophical contexts, Watkins explores the relevance of the introductory epigraphs and the importance of the poems' placement throughout the volume. At the center of Watkins's study is Barbauld's effort to develop a visionary poetic stance. He argues that the deliberate arrangement of the poems creates a coherent portrayal of Barbauld's poetic, political, and social vision, a vision born of her deep belief that the principles of love, sympathy, liberty, and pacifism are necessary for a secure and meaningful human reality. In tracing the contours of this effort, Watkins examines, in particular, the tension in Barbauld's poetry between her desire to engage directly with the political realities of the world and her equally strong longing for a pastoral world of peace and prosperity. Scholars of British literature and women writers will welcome this important study of one of the eighteenth century's foremost writers.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Barbauld's Poems in Contextp. 34
Politics, Vision, and Pastoralp. 50
Satire, Antipastoral, and Visionary Poeticsp. 79
Personal Life and Visionary Poeticsp. 94
Reflections on Writingp. 117
The Personal and Biblical Principles of Poetic Visionp. 144
God, Vision, and the Political Momentp. 173
Conclusionp. 195
Notesp. 205
Bibliographyp. 223
Indexp. 233
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem