Catalogue


Screening Morocco : contemporary film in a changing society /
Valérie K. Orlando.
imprint
Athens : Ohio University Press, 2011.
description
xxii, 190 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
9780896802810 (soft cover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Athens : Ohio University Press, 2011.
isbn
9780896802810 (soft cover : alk. paper)
contents note
Theories and polemics: Moroccan films as social-realist texts -- Issues, contexts, and "culture wars": Marocains residants é l'etranger (MREs) versus filmmakers at home -- Bad boys, drugs, and rock 'n' roll: the urban stories of Morocco -- Prison, torture, and testimony: retelling the memories of the lead years -- Women's voices: documenting Morocco through feminine lenses -- Conclusion: the future of Moroccan cinema?
catalogue key
8321692
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [179]-184) and index.
Includes filmography.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Valrie K. Orlando is Professor of French and Francophone Literatures at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is the author of several books, including Nomadic Voices of Exile, also published by Ohio University Press.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-03-01:
Four to ten films are made in Morocco every year. They are in French, Arabic, or Berber--never English; subtitles are always in French. Only rarely do Moroccan films appear in North America. Filmmakers working in Morocco are necessarily subversive and fettered because, observes Orlando (Univ. of Maryland, College Park), the king rules by divine right, "is directly descended from the prophet Mohammed," and "cannot be the object of debate." In looking at filmmakers' courage in facing controversial issues, the author is curiously uncritical of the state. Arguing that "[Moroccan] cinema accurately portrays the reality of the country," Orlando explores social and political themes: poverty, crime, abduction, Jews, homosexuals, corruption, illiteracy, unemployment, youth, royalty. She does particularly well with prison and torture. Another successful chapter: "Bad Boys, Drugs, and Rock 'n' Roll." But she evidences no objection to the status of women; she pads the soft chapter on women's rights with much about Tunisia and Algeria. Broad studies of the area have appeared, noteworthy among them Roy Armes's Postcolonial Images (CH, Oct'05, 43-0833), which treats North Africa, and Viola Shafik's Arab Cinema, rev. and expanded ed. (CH, May'08, 45-4879). Orlando's book is valuable for its puzzling lack of anger. The bibliography is extensive. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. H. Stacy emeritus, University of Hartford
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Screening Morocco' focuses on Moroccan films produced and distributed from 1999 to the present. Valerie K. Orlando introduces American readers to the richness in theme and scope of the cinematic production of Morocco.
Main Description
Since 1999 and the death of King Hassan II, Morocco has experienced a dramatic social transformation. Encouraged by the more openly democratic climate fostered by young King Mohammed VI, filmmakers have begun to explore the sociocultural and political debates of their country while also seeking to document the untold stories of a dark past. Screening Morocco: Contemporary Film in a Changing Society focuses on Moroccan films produced and distributed from 1999 to the present. Moroccan cinema serves as an all-inclusive medium that provides a sounding board for a society that is remaking itself. Male and female directors present the face of an engaged, multiethnic and multilingual society. Their cinematography promotes a country that is dynamic and connected to the global sociocultural economy of the twenty-first century. At the same time, they seek to represent the closed, obscure past of a nation’s history that has rarely been told, drawing on themes such as human rights abuse, the former incarceration of thousands during the Lead Years, women’s emancipation, poverty, and claims for social justice. Screening Morocco will introduce American readers to the richness in theme and scope of the cinematic production of Morocco.
Main Description
Since 1999 and the death of King Hassan II, Morocco has experienced a dramatic social transformation. Encouraged by the more openly democratic climate fostered by young King Mohammed VI, filmmakers have begun to explore the sociocultural and political debates of their country while also seeking to document the untold stories of a dark past.Screening Morocco: Contemporary Film in a Changing Societyfocuses on Moroccan films produced and distributed from 1999 to the present. Moroccan cinema serves as an all-inclusive medium that provides a sounding board for a society that is remaking itself. Male and female directors present the face of an engaged, multiethnic and multilingual society. Their cinematography promotes a country that is dynamic and connected to the global sociocultural economy of the twenty-first century. At the same time, they seek to represent the closed, obscure past of a nation's history that has rarely been told, drawing on themes such as human rights abuse, the former incarceration of thousands during the Lead Years, women's emancipation, poverty, and claims for social justice. Screening Moroccowill introduce American readers to the richness in theme and scope of the cinematic production of Morocco.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xxi
Introduction: Moroccan National Cinema: The Making of an Industryp. 1
Theories and Polemics: Moroccan Films as Social-Realist Textsp. 19
Issues, Contexts, and "Culture Wars" Marocains Résidants à l'Etranger (MREs): versus Filmmakers at Homep. 37
Bad Boys, Drugs, and Rock 'n' Roll: The Urban Stories of Moroccop. 71
Prison, Torture, and Testimony: Retelling the Memories of the Lead Tearsp. 101
Women's Voices: Documenting Morocco through Feminine Lensesp. 122
Conclusion: The Future of Moroccan Cinema?p. 154
Notesp. 163
Selected Filmographyp. 175
Bibliographyp. 179
Indexp. 185
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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