Catalogue


Sudan looks East : China, India & the politics of Asian alternatives /
edited by Daniel Large & Luke A. Patey.
imprint
New York : James Currey Ltd., c2011.
description
xi, 203 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1847010377, 9781847010377
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
New York : James Currey Ltd., c2011.
isbn
1847010377
9781847010377
catalogue key
8316636
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Daniel Large is research director of the Africa Asia Centre, Royal African Society at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. Luke A. Patey is a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for International Studies.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, June 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Driven by civil war and political isolation, Sudan's 'Look East' foreign policy has become fundamentally significant within Sudan and to its changing international politics. Sudan has also been a defining case of China's changing role in Africa. Despite dominating media coverage, however, little is known about the actual nature and significance of the Chinese engagement. At the same time, China has overshadowed Sudan's relations with India and Malaysia. This book provides a groundbreaking analysis of the rise of Asian interests in Sudan, their economic and political consequences, and role in Sudan's foreign relations.
Bowker Data Service Summary
By successfully turning to China, Malaysia and India from the mid-1990s, Sudan's 'look east' policy transformed the country's economy and foreign relations. This book places Sudan in the wider context of the expansion of Asia's global economic strength.
Unpaid Annotation
Places Sudan's oil industry (examined here in macro, micro and political terms), its economy, external relations and changing politics under the impact of the Darfur conflict and the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, in the wider context of the expansion of Asia's global economic strength.
Main Description
By successfully turning to China, Malaysia and India from the mid-1990s, amidst civil war and political isolation, Khartoum's 'Look East' policy transformed Sudan's economy and foreign relations. Sudan, in turn, has been a key theatre of Chinese, Indian and Malaysian overseas energy investment. What began as economic engagements born of pragmatic necessity later became politicized within Sudan and without, resulting in global attention. Despite its importance, widespread sustained interest and continuing political controversy, there is no single volume publication examining the rise and nature of Chinese, Malaysian and Indian interests in Sudan, their economic and political consequences, and role in Sudan's foreign relations. Addressing this gap, this book provides a groundbreaking analysis of Sudan's Look East policy. It offers the first substantive treatment of a subject of fundamental significance within Sudan that, additionally, has become a globally prominent dimension of its changing international politics. Daniel Large is research director of the Africa Asia Centre, Royal African Society at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, and founding director of the Rift Valley Institute's digital Sudan Open Archive. Luke A. Patey is a PhD Fellow at the Copenhagen Business School/Danish Institute for International Studies, Copenhagen, and project manager of the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs' Sudan Paths to Peace Research Network.
Table of Contents
notes On Contributorsp. vii
acknowledgementsp. ix
acronymsp. x
introduction sudan' looks East'p. 1
sudan's Foreign Relations Since Independencep. 35
the Oil Boom & Its Limitations In Sudanp. 52
local Relations Displacement, Of Oil Development Environmental Impact In Southern Sudan B & Resettlementp. 70
india In Sudan Troubles, In An African Boil 'Paradise'p. 87
malaysia-Sudan From Islamist Students, To Rentier Bourgeoisp. 102
'Dams Are Development' China, The Al-Lngaz Regime The Political Economy Of The Sudanese Nilep. 120
genocide Olympics How Activists Linked China, Darfur & Beijing 2008p. 139
southern Sudan Enemies & China Into Friends'?p. 157
conclusion Rfichina, India & The Politics Of Sudan's Asian Alternativesp. 176
Indexp. 195
List Of Figures
sudan's Trading Partnersp. 3
sudan's Oil Export Partners (2005-9)p. 15
china's Oil Importsp. 15
china's Trade With Sudanp. 15
sudan Oil Concession Mapp. 18
sudan Real GDP Growth Ratep. 57
sudan Debt (End 2009)p. 59
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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