Catalogue


Speaking up : a history of language and politics in Canada and Quebec /
Marcel Martel and Martin Pâquet ; translated by Patricia Dumas
imprint
Toronto : Between the Lines, c2012.
description
xi, 300 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1926662938 (Paper), 9781926662930 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Toronto : Between the Lines, c2012.
isbn
1926662938 (Paper)
9781926662930 (Paper)
general note
Translation of: Langue et politique au Canada et au Québec.
catalogue key
8314902
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
PRAISE FOR Speaking Up "Martel and P'quet leave no doubt about the centrality of language to political life in Canada and Quebec. A must read for anyone wishing to understand language debates in Canada's past and present." - Sean Mills, Assistant Professor of History, University of Toronto "Through its impressive national scope, Speaking Upsheds new light on the history of minority-majority relations in the country. With a subtle understanding of the concerns of linguistic groups, primarily French and English, but also including Aboriginal and other languages, Martel and P'quet deliver an engaging and convincing exploration of ethnic identities, schooling conflicts, and communication politics in a complex country." - Colin M. Coates, Director, Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies, York University " Speaking Upis an indispensable guide for anyone seeking to understand the place of language in Quebec politics. It is impossible to understand this province, or the desire of some here for independence, without an understanding of the historical context that defines the Québécois identity. Meticulously researched and comprehensive in scope, Speaking Up provides exactly that context. It should be required reading for English-Canadian pundits, most of whom so profoundly misunderstand this province." - Ethan Cox, Montreal-based writer, activist and political commentator, and the Quebec correspondent for rabble.ca
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Summaries
Main Description
Language issues have always been subject to debate in Canada. From the Conquest to the Quiet Revolution to the crisis of Regulation 17 to the various judgments of the Supreme Court, these often virulent debates have mobilized citizens--deeply concerned about recognition of their language and their rights--in the street, the media, or the courts. The state has responded with commissions of inquiry, legislation and legal action, and even police surveillance of citizens. Speaking Upcaptures the complex and fascinating history of the relationship between language and politics in Canada and Quebec from 1539 to the present. Nuanced and unbiased yet empathetic, the book reveals that the language issue has been at the heart of this country's political life for centuries. Translated from the multiple-award-winning Langue et politique au Canada et au Québec(Boréal, 2010).
Main Description
Speaking Uppresents a wide overview of the history of the relationship between language and politics in Canada and Quebec from 1539 to the present. Language issues have always been subject to debate in Canada. From the Conquest to the Quiet Revolution to the crisis of Regulation 17 to the various judgments of the Supreme Court, these often virulent debates have mobilized citizens--deeply concerned about recognition of their language and their rights--in the street, in the media, or in the courts. The state has responded with commissions of inquiry, legislation and legal action, and even police surveillance of citizens. A fascinating history of sound and fury, debates and struggles, tensions, but also of appeasement, Speaking Uptraces the long history of the language issue. Nuanced and unbiased yet empathetic, it shows that language has been at the heart of this country's political life for centuries. Translated from the multiple-award-winning Langue et politique au Canada et au Québec(Boréal, 2010).
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
The relation between language and politicsp. 2
General trends in the language issuep. 5
The six phases of a movementp. 8
From religion to language: 1539-1848p. 11
The king's language and faithp. 12
Ordinance of Villers-Cotterêts on the Administration of Justice (August 1539)p. 13
Emergence of a new language issuep. 23
Nationalizing languagep. 30
The 92 Resolutions (1834)p. 33
The first language tremors: The school crises in Canada, 1848-1927p. 45
Prohibiting in a context of fearp. 47
Regulation 17: Circular of Instruction No. 17 for Ontario Separate Schools for the School Year 1912-1913p. 60
Quebec: denouncing and enactingp. 64
The LaVergne Law (1910)-An Act to amend the Civil Code, respecting contracts made with public utility companiesp. 70
Showing solidarity to improve actionp. 70
All quiet on the front: From the repeal of Regulation 17 to the Laurendeau-Dunton Commission, 1927-63p. 75
Questions of identity and languagep. 76
Where were governments through all of this?p. 85
An Act to amend the Civil Service Act (1938)p. 87
Turmoil and new questioningp. 94
The Impertinences of Brother Anonymous (1959)p. 99
Action-reaction: Commissions of inquiry and agitation, 1963-69p. 107
Speaking outp. 108
Channelling the citizens' voicesp. 118
Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism (1963)p. 119
Commission of Inquiry on the Situation of the French Language and the Language Rights of Francophones (1968)p. 128
Urging the state to actp. 133
Action: Language laws, 1969-82p. 145
Ottawa's solution: institutional bilingualismp. 146
Canada's Official Languages Act (1968-69)p. 147
Quebec's common good: from freedom of choice to unilingualismp. 160
Charter of the French Language (1977)p. 167
The multiple provincial language policiesp. 175
Law and language since 1982p. 187
Law as the new language environmentp. 188
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (1982)p. 191
Reference re Secession of Quebec (1998)p. 195
An Act respecting the exercise of the fundamental rights and prerogatives of the Québec people and the Québec State, called Bill 99 (2000)p. 196
Mapping the interpretations of the Charterp. 198
The vitality of minority communities and Aboriginal peoplesp. 211
Conclusionp. 235
General trends in the language issuep. 238
How to live together: the weight of citizens' actionsp. 238
The duties of living together: the permanency of law and normsp. 241
The will to live together: language between market and memoryp. 245
Acknowledgementsp. 249
Abbreviationsp. 252
Notesp. 253
Bibliographyp. 268
Indexp. 278
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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