Catalogue

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Intimacy and sexuality in the age of Shakespeare /
James M. Bromley.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
description
viii, 210 p.
ISBN
1107015189 (hardback), 9781107015180 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
isbn
1107015189 (hardback)
9781107015180 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Introduction: interiority, futurity, and affective relations in Renaissance literature; 1. Intimacy and narrative closure in Christopher Marlowe's Hero and Leander; 2. A funny thing happened on the way to the altar: the anus, marriage, and narrative in Shakespeare; 3. Social status and the intimacy of masochistic sexual practice in Beaumont and Fletcher and Middleton; 4. Nuns and nationhood: intimacy in convents in Renaissance drama; 5. Female homoeroticism, race, and public forms of intimacy in the works of Lady Mary Wroth; Epilogue: invitation to a queer life.
abstract
"In his 1583 The Anatomy of Abuses, Philip Stubbes famously charged that drama taught audiences how to "play the Sodomits, or worse."1 Stubbes's capacious "or worse," I would suggest, refers to certain affective relations that eventually became illegible under the rubrics of modern intimacy. In this book, I map the circulation of knowledge about these queer affections, not only in the plays that Stubbes targets, but also in poetry and prose written between 1588 and 1625. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the intimate sphere coalesced around relations characterized by two elements: interiorized desire and futurity. Interiorized desire locates the truth about the self and sexuality inside the body, thereby organizing and limiting the body's pleasures based on a hierarchized opposition between depths and surfaces. Access to futurity involves the perceived sense of a relationship's duration and its participation in legitimate social and sexual reproduction. These changes, of which Stubbes's charge is one of many indices, laid the foundation for modern understandings of normative intimacy as coextensive with long-term heterosexual monogamy. Coupling, and more specifically marriage, was invested with value as a site where affection was desirable -"--
"James Bromley argues that Renaissance texts circulate knowledge about a variety of non-standard sexual practices and intimate life narratives, including non-monogamy, anal eroticism, masochism and cross-racial female homoeroticism. Rethinking current assumptions about intimacy in Renaissance drama, poetry and prose, the book blends historicized and queer approaches to embodiment, narrative and temporality. An important contribution to Renaissance literary studies, queer theory and the history of sexuality, the book demonstrates the relevance of Renaissance literature to today. Through close readings of William Shakespeare's 'problem comedies', Christopher Marlowe's Hero and Leander, plays by Beaumont and Fletcher, Thomas Middleton's The Nice Valour and Lady Mary Wroth's sonnet sequence Pamphilia to Amphilanthus and her prose romance The Urania, Bromley re-evaluates notions of the centrality of deep, abiding affection in Renaissance culture and challenges our own investment in a narrowly defined intimate sphere"--
catalogue key
8314308
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Advance praise: 'One relishes the way in which Bromley pursues his arguments … via texts other than the usual suspects. And when Bromley does now and again take up some of the more expected literary cases for a study of early modern intimacy (and its discontents), he succeeds in making those works look different. This book is well informed regarding the most pertinent critical debates of the moment in sexuality studies.' Richard Rambuss, Brown University
"One relishes the way in which Bromley pursues his arguments - all fairly polemical ones - via texts other than the usual suspects. And when Bromley does now and again take up some of the more expected literary cases for a study of early modern intimacy (and its discontents), he succeeds in making those works look different. This book is well informed regarding the most pertinent critical debates of the moment in sexuality studies. Especially welcome is how it brings recent queer work on the nationalized public and private spheres - scholarship which has thus far been mostly Americanist in its "sexual orientation" - to bear on English Renaissance literature and culture." -Richard Rambuss, Brown University
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
An important contribution to queer theory and the history of sexuality, this book investigates how Renaissance texts circulate knowledge about non-standard sexual practices and intimate life narratives.
Description for Bookstore
An important contribution to queer theory and the history of sexuality, this book investigates how Renaissance texts circulate knowledge about non-standard sexual practices and intimate life narratives. Through close readings of both canonical and non-canonical texts, Bromley re-evaluates our notions of the centrality of deep, abiding affection in Renaissance culture.
Main Description
James Bromley argues that Renaissance texts circulate knowledge about a variety of non-standard sexual practices and intimate life narratives, including non-monogamy, anal eroticism, masochism and cross-racial female homoeroticism. Rethinking current assumptions about intimacy in Renaissance drama, poetry and prose, the book blends historicized and queer approaches to embodiment, narrative and temporality. An important contribution to Renaissance literary studies, queer theory and the history of sexuality, the book demonstrates the relevance of Renaissance literature to today. Through close readings of William Shakespeare's 'problem comedies', Christopher Marlowe's Hero and Leander, plays by Beaumont and Fletcher, Thomas Middleton's The Nice Valour and Lady Mary Wroth's sonnet sequence Pamphilia to Amphilanthus and her prose romance The Urania, Bromley re-evaluates notions of the centrality of deep, abiding affection in Renaissance culture and challenges our own investment in a narrowly defined intimate sphere.

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