Catalogue


Algerians without borders : the making of a global frontier society /
Allan Christelow.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2012.
description
xi, 250 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813037557 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9780813037554 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2012.
isbn
0813037557 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9780813037554 (hbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
A failed transformation, 1775-1830 -- Colonial-era border crossing, 1830-1911 -- The last jihad and the end of Hijra, 1911-1920 -- Exchange and innovation in the revolutionary era -- Algerians in an age of globalization -- Conclusion: the dynamics of fear and hope on a frontier between civilizations.
catalogue key
8314251
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [215]-240) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Allan Christelow, professor of history at Idaho State University, is the author of Muslim Law Courts and the French Colonial State in Algeria and Thus Ruled Emir Abbas: Selected Cases from the Emir of Kano's Judicial Council.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-05-01:
Algeria's borders exist, but are regularly traversed, both physically and mentally. Christelow's scholarly stance--feet planted in North and West Africa (Nigeria) with an American perspective--helps trace Algerians' engagement with the modern world. A longtime crossroads of Africa, Europe, and the Middle East, this is frontier territory, neither boundary nor contact zone, but rather, a process and series of encounters. Algerines' apparent skill in negotiating borders derives from hard experience surviving political repression and violence. Conflicts flourished with corsairing, French occupation from 1830, the 1954-62 independence struggle, and civil war in the 1990s. Colonial legacies persist in education, cultural forms, and migration, and Algerian-descended citizens joined in France's banlieue riots in 1981 and 2005. Christelow (Idaho State Univ.) acknowledges a "clash of civilizations" but questions its determinative influence. He is sanguine about conflict resolution through interfaith and cultural dialogues among Muslims, Christians, Jews, and secularists. Fascinating figures abound: warrior-statesmen ('Abd al-Qadir), intellectuals (Malik Bennabi), captives, refugees, even a Freemason exiled in Philadelphia in 1794. Their histories deserve greater attention, and here they receive their due. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Most levels; academic and large public libraries. T. P. Johnson University of Massachusetts, Boston
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In this examination of Algeria through its migration history, Allan Christelow presents a long-term picture of the different ways in which Algerians have crossed borders. These include military service; asylum seeking; captivity and imprisonment; travel for commerce, study, or religious purposes; and labor migration.
Description for Bookstore
"Maps a fascinating and far-flung global frontier that Algerians have crossed over for centuries. This is not only a history of the modern and contemporary Algerian diaspora but also an instructive study of political, social, cultural, and economic encounters and negotiations that occur at the interstices of civilizations. Christelow contributes an impressive and erudite narrative that widens and enriches the corpus of modern Algerian historiography."-Phillip C. Naylor, author of North Africa: A History from Antiquity to the Present This account of Algeria through its migratory history begins in the last quarter of the eighteenth century by looking at forced migration through the slave trade. It moves through the colonial era and continues into Algeria's turbulent postcolonial experience. In Algerians without Borders, Allan Christelow examines the factors that have drawn or pushed Algerians to cross borders, both literal and metaphoric. He provides an in-depth analysis of the results of these crossings: from problematic efforts to secure external support for political projects, to building interfaith dialogue and the exploration of new ideas, to the emergence of new communities. He also investigates the return of border crossers to Algeria and the challenges they face in adapting to new environments, whether negotiating alliances, engaging in dialogue, or simply seeking legal acceptance. Christelow concludes with a discussion of the last few decades of Algerian history. He explores how Algerian intellectuals operated outside of the country's borders, spurred on by the rise of Islamism as well as by freer dialogues with Western powers, specifically Britain and the United States. The result is an alternate history of Algeria that demonstrates just how much its citizens' engagement with other societies has transformed the country. Allan Christelow, professor of history at Idaho State University, is the author of Muslim Law Courts and the French Colonial State in Algeriaand Thus Ruled Emir Abbas.
Description for Bookstore
“Maps a fascinating and far-flung global frontier that Algerians have crossed over for centuries. This is not only a history of the modern and contemporary Algerian diaspora but also an instructive study of political, social, cultural, and economic encounters and negotiations that occur at the interstices of civilizations. Christelow contributes an impressive and erudite narrative that widens and enriches the corpus of modern Algerian historiography.”-Phillip C. Naylor, author of North Africa: A History from Antiquity to the Present This account of Algeria through its migratory history begins in the last quarter of the eighteenth century by looking at forced migration through the slave trade. It moves through the colonial era and continues into Algeria’s turbulent postcolonial experience. In Algerians without Borders, Allan Christelow examines the factors that have drawn or pushed Algerians to cross borders, both literal and metaphoric. He provides an in-depth analysis of the results of these crossings: from problematic efforts to secure external support for political projects, to building interfaith dialogue and the exploration of new ideas, to the emergence of new communities. He also investigates the return of border crossers to Algeria and the challenges they face in adapting to new environments, whether negotiating alliances, engaging in dialogue, or simply seeking legal acceptance. Christelow concludes with a discussion of the last few decades of Algerian history. He explores how Algerian intellectuals operated outside of the country’s borders, spurred on by the rise of Islamism as well as by freer dialogues with Western powers, specifically Britain and the United States. The result is an alternate history of Algeria that demonstrates just how much its citizens’ engagement with other societies has transformed the country. Allan Christelow, professor of history at Idaho State University, is the author of Muslim Law Courts and the French Colonial State in Algeriaand Thus Ruled Emir Abbas.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Note on Transcriptionp. xiii
Introduction: A People on a Frontier of Civilizationsp. 1
A Failed Transformation, 1775-1830p. 25
Colonial-Era Border Crossing, 1830-1911p. 50
The Last Jihad and the End of Hijra, 1911-1920p. 82
Exchange and Innovation in the Revolutionary Erap. 108
Algerians in an Age of Globalizationp. 141
Conclusion: The Dynamics of Fear and Hope on a Frontier between Civilizationsp. 174
Epilogue: 'Asabiya in the Digital Agep. 187
Glossaryp. 189
Notesp. 191
Bibliographyp. 215
Indexp. 241
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem