Catalogue


The international ambitions of Mao and Nehru : national efficacy beliefs and the making of foreign policy /
Andrew Bingham Kennedy.
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
description
ix, 261 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521193516 (hardback), 9780521193511 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
isbn
0521193516 (hardback)
9780521193511 (hardback)
abstract
"Why do leaders sometimes challenge, rather than accept, the international structures that surround their states? In The International Ambitions of Mao and Nehru, Andrew Kennedy answers this question through in-depth studies of Chinese foreign policy under Mao Zedong and Indian foreign policy under Jawaharlal Nehru. Drawing on international relations theory and psychological research, Kennedy offers a new theoretical explanation for bold leadership in foreign policy, one that stresses the beliefs that leaders develop about the national efficacy of their states. He shows how this approach illuminates several of Mao and Nehru's most important military and diplomatic decisions, drawing on archival evidence and primary source materials from China, India, the United States, and the United Kingdom. A rare blend of theoretical innovation and historical scholarship, The International Ambitions of Mao and Nehru is a fascinating portrait of how foreign policy decisions are made"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
8312374
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Andrew Bingham Kennedy teaches international politics at the Crawford School of Economics and Government at the Australian National University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-08-01:
Kennedy (Australian National Univ.) attempts to debunk the theory that leaders merely respond to the incentives and constraints of the international system. He focuses on two leaders, Mao Zedong and Jawaharlal Nehru, both of whom left a lasting legacy on the foreign policies of China and India, respectively. He demonstrates how these leaders sought to actively reshape the international system during their time in office, despite the risks involved. Kennedy argues that the national efficacy beliefs of these leaders (i.e., belief in the ability of their state to achieve particular outcomes) shaped their foreign policy preferences during the Cold War period. The development of these beliefs is related to the historical experiences of the leaders. Grounded in the individual-level analysis approach to international relations, this book is a significant contribution to the field and highlights the influence of individual leaders on Chinese and Indian foreign policy decision making. Summing Up: Recommended. All readership levels. A. Mazumdar University of St. Thomas
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An insightful, well argued, and solidly documented re-interpretation of the psychology and foreign policy choices of Mao Zedong and Jawaharlal Nehru. Kennedy convincingly links the historical experience of India's independence movement and China's revolutionary upheaval to differing belief systems of Mao and Nehru, and then those beliefs to the foreign policy choices of the two leaders. He argues convincingly that India's long and successful non-violent struggle for independence, and the victory of the Chinese revolution against seemingly overwhelming odds, gave rise to different beliefs about the efficacy of moral suasion and war, and that Nehru's and Mao's embrace of these varying world views deeply influenced those leaders management of their nation's foreign relations. An important contribution to the study of the psychology of political leadership and comparative foreign policy."-John Garver, Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, Georgia Institute of Technology
"The International Ambitions of Mao and Nehru is the work of a gifted scholar, one knowledgeable of both Chinese and Indian foreign relations. Indeed, there are very few individuals working in the field of Asian security studies who have shown a comparable mastery of both countries. Moreover, Kennedy has broader aspirations than to simply study Chinese and Indian foreign policy, rather through his development of the concept of national efficacy beliefs he aims to speak to debates in international relations theory and security studies about fundamental aspects of international politics." - Allen Carlson, Cornell University
"Why do some states favor combat, others conversation? In this meticulously researched, sensitively interpreted, and analytically commanding account of Mao and Nehru, Andrew Kennedy develops a striking argument, centered around the concept of 'national efficacy.' This is an exemplary study in comparative international history and international relations - rich in detail, clear in its argument, it highlights the critical importance of historical and political context in shaping the beliefs of leaders, and explaining state actions. For anyone interested in grasping the international outlooks of two states today poised to reshape the global order, this book is an essential starting point."-Sunil Khilnani, Avantha Professor and Director, India Institute, King's College London
"Andrew Kennedy has written a terrific book that challenges the conventional wisdom about the constraints on leaders in international politics. By combining theoretical creativity with careful historical research, he demonstrates how Mao Zedong and Jawaharlal Nehru chose to pursue bold and risky strategies in their relations with other states. The result is persuasive study that advances international relations theory as well as our knowledge of Chinese and Indian foreign policy." -M. Taylor Fravel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
"Andrew Kennedy has focused on a most unlikely comparison of the leadership styles and foreign policies of two twentieth-century Asian nationalists of extraordinary significance: Jawaharlal Nehru of India and Mao-Tse-Tung of the People's Republic of China. Nehru was an aristocratic, Anglophilic, and erudite nationalist passionately committed to the principles of liberal democracy at home and in the world. Mao was a peasant revolutionary who ushered in a violent revolution and created a totalitarian state which presided over the deaths of millions through ill-conceived policies of social and economic transformation. Despite these obvious contrasts, both individuals sought to pursue significant foreign policy goals for their respective nations. Kennedy's carefully researched, historically-grounded and theoretically supple work makes an important contribution to studies of both leadership and foreign policy." - Sumit Ganguly, Indiana University, Bloomington
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2012
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Drawing on international relations theory and psychological research, this book explains the dramatically different foreign policies adopted by China under Mao Zedong and by India under Jawaharlal Nehru. It differs from purely historical studies in that it develops and applies a theory of how political leaders make foreign policy.
Description for Bookstore
Drawing on international relations theory and psychological research, this book explains the dramatically different foreign policies adopted by China under Mao Zedong and by India under Jawaharlal Nehru. It differs from purely historical studies in that it develops and applies a theory of how political leaders make foreign policy. It differs from more theoretical studies in the extent to which it relies on new archival research and primary source materials.
Library of Congress Summary
"Why do leaders sometimes challenge, rather than accept, the international structures that surround their states? In The International Ambitions of Mao and Nehru, Andrew Kennedy answers this question through in-depth studies of Chinese foreign policy under Mao Zedong and Indian foreign policy under Jawaharlal Nehru. Drawing on international relations theory and psychological research, Kennedy offers a new theoretical explanation for bold leadership in foreign policy, one that stresses the beliefs that leaders develop about the national efficacy of their states. He shows how this approach illuminates several of Mao and Nehru's most important military and diplomatic decisions, drawing on archival evidence and primary source materials from China, India, the United States, and the United Kingdom. A rare blend of theoretical innovation and historical scholarship, The International Ambitions of Mao and Nehru is a fascinating portrait of how foreign policy decisions are made"--
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Mapsp. vi
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
National Efficacy Beliefs and Foreign Policyp. 10
Mao's China
Same Revolution, Different Dreamsp. 43
Mao's Adventure in Koreap. 68
Persistent Pugnacityp. 103
Nehru's India
Gandhi's Dissimilar Disciplesp. 139
Nehru's Misstep in Kashmirp. 173
Determined Diplomacyp. 201
Conclusionp. 238
Indexp. 253
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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