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Power and state formation in West Africa : Appolonia from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century /
Pierluigi Valsecchi ; translated by Allan Cameron.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
x, 317 p. : maps ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0230117767 (hardback), 9780230117761 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230117767 (hardback)
9780230117761 (hardback)
general note
A longer version of this book was first published in Italian by Carocci Editore in 2002 under title: I signori di Appolonia.
abstract
"This study looks at the political and social history of the Gold Coast in West Africa from the early 16th century to the second half of the 18th. It mainly focuses on the western extreme of the Gold Coast, the region known as Nzema, which today has been divided between Ghana and the Ivory Coast. In linguistic, cultural, historical, and political terms, Nzema is part of the Akan world, a larger formation of societies sharing many common elements. The book examines the logic behind the manner in which political entities in Nzema were structured territorially, as well as the formation of ruling groups and aspects of their political, economic, and military actions, while placing all these in the wider regional context. The object is to give historical substance to the shift from a politically fragmented situation to the territorially and institutionally unified Kingdom of Appolonia, marked by a considerable concentration of power in the hands of a select few, who controlled the institutions and trade with Europe"--
catalogue key
8308021
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [281]-292) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Pierluigi Valsecchi is a professor of African History, University of Pavia, Italy.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-07-01:
Valsecchi (Univ. of Pavia, Italy) explores the process of political centralization within the expansion of coastal Atlantic trade during the 16th-18th centuries in the western Gold Coast region of Appolonia (Nezema). The author provides important insight into the political development of one specific section of the Gold Coast and how regional participation in the Atlantic trade, and thus sustained contact with European traders and company officials, influenced this process. The work illustrates the difficulty of studying this period, as the existing sources create confusion because of cultural misunderstandings, the lack of knowledge, and the assignment of multiple names for the same place. Valsecchi begins his interdisciplinary work by discussing the question of identity within this region and systematically exploring the variety of names and terms associated with Appolonia. From there, he carefully examines the evolution of the political system from its fragmented state in the 16th century to the mid-18th-century creation of the centralized state of Appolonia. The author clearly shows how trade and cultural interaction influenced this political development, and provides an excellent example of the importance of interdisciplinary work to West Africa in this period. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, faculty. T. M. Reese Univ. of North Dakota
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work looks at the political and social history of the Gold Coast in West Africa from the early 16th century to the second half of the 18th. The book examines how political entities in Nzema were structured territorially, as well as the formation of ruling groups and aspects of their political, economic, and military actions.
Library of Congress Summary
"This study looks at the political and social history of the Gold Coast in West Africa from the early 16th century to the second half of the 18th. It mainly focuses on the western extreme of the Gold Coast, the region known as Nzema, which today has been divided between Ghana and the Ivory Coast. In linguistic, cultural, historical, and political terms, Nzema is part of the Akan world, a larger formation of societies sharing many common elements. The book examines the logic behind the manner in which political entities in Nzema were structured territorially, as well as the formation of ruling groups and aspects of their political, economic, and military actions, while placing all these in the wider regional context. The object is to give historical substance to the shift from a politically fragmented situation to the territorially and institutionally unified Kingdom of Appolonia, marked by a considerable concentration of power in the hands of a select few, who controlled the institutions and trade with Europe"--
Main Description
A longer version of this book was first published in Italian by Carocci Editore in 2002 under title: I signori di Appolonia.
Main Description
This study looks at the political and social history of the Gold Coast in West Africa from the early sixteenth century to the second half of the eighteenth. It mainly focuses on the western extreme of the Gold Coast, the region known as Nzema, which today has been divided between Ghana and the Ivory Coast. In linguistic, cultural, historical, and political terms, Nzema is part of the Akan world, a larger formation of societies sharing many common elements. The book examines the logic behind the manner in which political entities in Nzema were structured territorially, as well as the formation of ruling groups and aspects of their political, economic, and military actions, while placing all these in the wider regional context. The object is to give historical substance to the shift from a politically fragmented situation to the territorially and institutionally unified Kingdom of Appolonia, marked by a considerable concentration of power in the hands of a select few, who controlled the institutions and trade with Europe.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vi
Primary Sources and Abbreviationsp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Note to the Readersp. xi
Introductionp. 1
History and Identityp. 19
The Regional Landscapep. 41
Politics and Tradep. 59
Changes in the Second Half of the Seventeenth Centuryp. 93
Warning Signs of a Shifting Balancep. 119
Big Men, Imperial Dynamics, and Local Powersp. 139
The New Maanle of Appolonia: Development of a Networkp. 167
The Framework of Hegemonyp. 199
Notesp. 221
Bibliographyp. 281
Indexp. 293
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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