Catalogue


Regimens of the mind : Boyle, Locke, and the early modern cultura animi tradition /
Sorana Corneanu.
imprint
Chicago ; London : The University of Chicago Press, 2011.
description
ix, 308 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0226116395 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780226116396 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chicago ; London : The University of Chicago Press, 2011.
isbn
0226116395 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780226116396 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Francis Bacon and the art of direction -- An art of tempering the mind -- The distempered mind and the tree of knowledge -- A comprehensive culture of the mind -- The end of knowledge -- The study of nature as regimen -- Cultura and medicina animi: an early modern tradition -- The physician of the soul -- Sources -- Genres -- Utility: practical versus speculative knowledge -- Self-love and the fallen/uncultured mind -- The office of reason -- Passions, errors, and assent -- The discipline, the virtues, and habituation -- Virtuoso discipline -- The cure of the mind and Solomon's house -- Passions, errors, and method -- Idols and diseases of the mind -- Epistemic modesty -- The way of inquiry -- A 'union of eyes and hands': the community and objectivity revisited -- Robert Boyle: experience as paideia -- The limits and the 'perfection' of reason -- The weak mind and the virtues of a free inquiry -- Reason and experience -- The Christian philosopher -- John Locke and the education of the mind -- Limits of reason, useful knowledge, and the duty to search for truth -- A natural history of the distempered mind -- The regulation of assent: a perfecting exercise -- The discourse with a friend -- Studying nature -- Lived physics -- The appropriateness of disproportion -- Experience, history, and speculation -- Affective cognition -- Studying 'God's contrivances' -- The study of theology and the growth of the mind -- Worlds and angels -- Reading scripture -- Conclusion.
catalogue key
8307998
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 279-300) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-09-01:
Between medieval scholasticism and the impersonal objectivity of the modern scientific method lies a little-examined notion of knowledge as the correction and cultivation of the mind, itself prone to fanaticism, dogmatism, and false beliefs as a result of the Adamic fall into sin. In this carefully argued book, Corneanu (Univ. of Bucharest, Romania) identifies the practices and exercises--the regimens of the mind--whereby 17th-century natural philosophers sought to overcome the pitfalls typical of the credulous fallen mind. Corneanu traces the conception of the paideiac cultivation and medical cure of the mind as key images for transforming oneself as a virtuous philosophical learner, beginning with Bacon's "idols," going to the natural philosophers of the Royal Society, and through to Boyle and Locke. Corneanu's panoptic view of primary texts and close attention to the authors' presentation of the craft of knowing deserve a careful, close reading by all scholars of early modern thought, both British and Continental. The author assumes her readers' familiarity with her sources, making this text unsuitable for undergraduates, but nonetheless essential for fellow scholars. An important contribution to early modern scholarship. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students and researchers/faculty. S. Young McHenry County College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An excellent work with an original and challenging thesis that is articulated with admirable clarity. Regimens of the Mind will make a major contribution to our understanding of the history of science, philosophy, and religion in seventeenth-century England."
"An excellent work with an original and challenging thesis that is articulated with admirable clarity. Regimens of the Mind will make a major contribution to our understanding of the history of science, philosophy, and religion in seventeenth-century England."Peter Harrison, University of Oxford
“An excellent work with an original and challenging thesis that is articulated with admirable clarity. Regimens of the Mind will make a major contribution to our understanding of the history of science, philosophy, and religion in seventeenth-century England.”-Peter Harrison, University of Oxford
"An outstanding study of the cultura animi tradition and its impact on the emergence of early modern experimental philosophy. Through a careful analysis of a broad sweep of primary sources, including the writings of Francis Bacon, Robert Boyle, and John Locke, Corneanu demonstrates that in seventeenth-century England the acquisition of knowledge of nature was not merely a matter of apprehending the nature of the world itself, but also of correctly ordering and curing the knower's mind."
"An outstanding study of the cultura animi tradition and its impact on the emergence of early modern experimental philosophy. Through a careful analysis of a broad sweep of primary sources, including the writings of Francis Bacon, Robert Boyle, and John Locke, Corneanu demonstrates that in seventeenth-century England the acquisition of knowledge of nature was not merely a matter of apprehending the nature of the world itself, but also of correctly ordering and curing the knower's mind."-Peter Anstey, University of Otago
“An outstanding study of the cultura animi tradition and its impact on the emergence of early modern experimental philosophy. Through a careful analysis of a broad sweep of primary sources, including the writings of Francis Bacon, Robert Boyle, and John Locke, Corneanu demonstrates that in seventeenth-century England the acquisition of knowledge of nature was not merely a matter of apprehending the nature of the world itself, but also of correctly ordering and curing the knower’s mind.”-Peter Anstey, University of Otago
"Carefully argued. . . . Corneanu's panotpic view of primary texts and close attention to the atuhors' presentation of the craft of knowing deserve a careful, close reading by all scholars of early modern thought, both British and Continental. . . . An important contribution to early modern scholarship. Highly recommended."
"For years we have been taught that early modern philosophy is characterized by the epistemological turn and obsessed with the threat of skepticism. In Regimens of the Mind , Sorana Corneanu shows us a very different side of the period. Focusing on Bacon, Boyle, Locke, and the 'experimental philosophy' that grew up in the Royal Society, she shows us the moral dimension of their philosophical and scientific projects. For Corneanu, their enterprise is the cultura animi , nothing less than the reordering and perfecting of the human mind. This elegant and erudite new book should bring about a reordering of our own minds: it will change the way we read these central figures and the intellectual context in which they worked."-Daniel Garber, Princeton University
“For years we have been taught that early modern philosophy is characterized by the epistemological turn and obsessed with the threat of skepticism. In Regimens of the Mind , Sorana Corneanu shows us a very different side of the period. Focusing on Bacon, Boyle, Locke, and the ‘experimental philosophy’ that grew up in the Royal Society, she shows us the moral dimension of their philosophical and scientific projects. For Corneanu, their enterprise is the cultura animi , nothing less than the reordering and perfecting of the human mind. This elegant and erudite new book should bring about a reordering of our own minds: it will change the way we read these central figures and the intellectual context in which they worked.”-Daniel Garber, Princeton University
"From Bacon to Locke, the remedying of the defects of the mind and the perfecting of its faculties was an important objective of inquiry into the natural world, but never has this development been explored in such detail as it is here. Regimens of the Mind is a splendid exploration of the moral dimension of natural philosophy in seventeenth-century England."
"From Bacon to Locke, the remedying of the defects of the mind and the perfecting of its faculties was an important objective of inquiry into the natural world, but never has this development been explored in such detail as it is here. Regimens of the Mind is a splendid exploration of the moral dimension of natural philosophy in seventeenth-century England."-Stephen Gaukroger, University of Sydney
“From Bacon to Locke, the remedying of the defects of the mind and the perfecting of its faculties was an important objective of inquiry into the natural world, but never has this development been explored in such detail as it is here. Regimens of the Mind is a splendid exploration of the moral dimension of natural philosophy in seventeenth-century England.”-Stephen Gaukroger, University of Sydney
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this work, Sorana Corneanu proposes a different approach to the epistemological and methodological doctrines of the leading experimental philosophers of 17th-century England, an approach that considers their often overlooked moral, psychological, and theological elements.
Main Description
In Regimens of the Mind , Sorana Corneanu proposes a new approach to the epistemological and methodological doctrines of the leading experimental philosophers of seventeenth-century England, an approach that considers their often overlooked moral, psychological, and theological elements. Corneanu focuses on the views about the pursuit of knowledge in the writings of Robert Boyle and John Locke, as well as in those of several of their influences, including Francis Bacon and the early Royal Society virtuosi. She argues that their experimental programs of inquiry fulfill the role of regimens for curing, ordering, and educating the mind toward an ethical purpose, an idea she tracks back to the ancient tradition of cultura animi . Corneanu traces this idea through its early modern revival and illustrates how it organizes the experimental philosophers’ reflections on the discipline of judgment, the study of nature, and the study of Scripture. It is through this lens, the author suggests, that the core features of the early modern English experimental philosophy-including its defense of experience, its epistemic modesty, its communal nature, and its pursuit of “objectivity”-are best understood.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Francis Bacon and the Art of Directionp. 14
An art of tempering the mindp. 14
The distempered mind and the tree of knowledgep. 18
A comprehensive culture of the mindp. 26
The end of knowledgep. 30
The study of nature as regimenp. 34
Cultura and Medicina Animi: An Early Modern Traditionp. 46
The physician of the soulp. 46
Sourcesp. 48
Genresp. 52
Utility: practical versus speculative knowledgep. 58
Self-love and the fallen/uncultured mindp. 60
The office of reasonp. 64
Passions, errors, and assentp. 67
The discipline, the virtues, and habituationp. 71
Virtuoso Disciplinep. 79
The cure of the mind and Solomon's Housep. 79
Passions, errors, and methodp. 84
Idols and diseases of the mindp. 90
Epistemic modestyp. 95
The way of inquiryp. 99
A "union of eyes and hands"; The community and objectivity revisitedp. 106
Robert Boyle: Experience as Paideiap. 114
The limits and the "perfection" of reasonp. 114
The weak mind and the virtues of a free inquiryp. 118
Reason and experiencep. 127
The Christian philosopherp. 138
John Locke and the Education of the Mindp. 141
Limits of reason, useful knowledge, and the duty to search for truthp. 141
A natural history of the distempered mindp. 146
The regulation of assent: A perfecting exercisep. 154
The discourse with a friendp. 165
Studying Naturep. 169
Lived physicsp. 169
The appropriateness of disproportionp. 172
Experience, history, and speculationp. 181
Affective cognitionp. 190
Studying "God's Contrivances"p. 198
The study of theology and the growth of the mindp. 198
Worlds and angelsp. 203
Reading Scripturep. 210
Conclusionp. 220
List of Abbreviationsp. 231
Notesp. 233
Bibliographyp. 279
Indexp. 301
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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