Catalogue


How Britain won the War of 1812 : the Royal Navy's blockades of the United States, 1812-1815 /
Brian Arthur.
imprint
Woodbridge ; Rochester, NY : Boydell Press, 2011.
description
xxiii, 328 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1843836653 (hbk), 9781843836650 (hbk)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Woodbridge ; Rochester, NY : Boydell Press, 2011.
isbn
1843836653 (hbk)
9781843836650 (hbk)
contents note
Convoys and blockades: the evolution of maritime economic warfare -- War at a distance: constraints and solutions -- From business partners to enemies: Britain and the United States before 1812 -- The United States blockaded: Admiral Warren's 'united command,' August 1812-April 1814 -- Blockades and blunders: Vice-Admiral Cochrane's command, April 1814-February 1815 -- Trade and war: the effects of Warren's blockades, August 1812-April 1814 -- Capital and credit: the impact of the final phase -- Results and conclusions.
catalogue key
8307903
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 305-318) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Brian Arthur, gained a PhD at the University of Greenwich in Britain, following research in the United States which was completed with the aid of a Caird North America Fellowship from the National Maritime Museum in London.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Wall Street Journal, January 2012
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Summaries
Main Description
The War of 1812 between Britain and the United States was fought on many fronts: single ship actions in the Atlantic; a US invasion of Canada, which the Canadians heroically resisted; the burning of the new US capital, Washington, by the British, the President's house subsequently painted white to hide the fire damage; and an unsuccessful attack by the British on New Orleans. The war is usually seen as a draw. However, as this book demonstrates, it was in fact a British victory. The United States achieved none of its war aims, and the peace, concluded in December 1814, met Britain's long-term maritime needs. This book reassesses the war, showing how the British achieved success through an effective commercial maritime blockade which had devastating consequences on the vulnerable, undeveloped US economy. Neutral vessels were included - one of the causes of the war had been the United States' objection to British interference with US ships in Britain's war with Napoleonic France - and Britain's refusal to concede this point enabled the strategy of commercial maritime blockades to be reused by Britain to good effect in subsequent wars, including those of 1914-18 and 1939-45. BR>BRIAN ARTHUR gained a PhD at the University of Greenwich in Britain, following research in the United States which was completed with the aid of a Caird North America Fellowship from the National Maritime Museum in London.
Unpaid Annotation
Overturns established thinking about the Anglo-American War of 1812-15.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title reasseses the War of 1812, showing how the British achieved victory through an effective commercial blockade, which had devastating consequences on the vulnerable, undeveloped US economy, and showing how important and effective the strategy of maritime commercial blockade.
Unpaid Annotation
Overturns established thinking about the Anglo-American War of 1812-14.
Main Description
Named one of the 20 Notable Naval Books of 2011 in the US Naval Institute Proceedings Magazine, May 2012 The War of 1812 between Britain and the United States was fought on many fronts: single ship actions in the Atlantic; a US invasion of Canada, which the Canadians heroically resisted; the burning of the new US capital, Washington, by the British, the President's house subsequently painted white to hide the fire damage; and an unsuccessful attack by the British on New Orleans. The war is usually seen as a draw. However, as this book demonstrates, it was in fact a British victory. The United States achieved none of its war aims, and the peace, concluded in December 1814, met Britain's long-term maritime needs. This book reassesses the war, showing how the British achieved success through an effective commercial maritime blockade which had devastating consequences on the vulnerable, undeveloped US economy. Neutral vessels were included - one of the causes of the war had been the United States' objection to British interference with US ships in Britain's war with Napoleonic France - and Britain's refusal to concede this point enabled the strategy of commercial maritime blockades to be reused by Britain to good effect in subsequent wars, including those of 1914-18 and 1939-45. BRIAN ARTHUR gained a PhD at the University of Greenwich in Britain, following research in the United States which was completed with the aid of a Caird North America Fellowship from the National Maritime Museum in London.
Main Description
The Anglo-American War of 1812-14 was fought on many fronts: single ship actions in the Atlantic; a US invasion of Canada, which the Canadians heroically resisted; an unsuccessful attack by the British on New Orleans; the burning of the new US capital, Washington, by the British, the President's house subsequently painted white to hide the burn damage. The war is usually seen as a draw. However, as this book demonstrates, it was in fact a British victory. The United States achieved none of its war aims, and was obliged to accept unsatisfactory peace terms. This book reassesses the war, showing how the British achieved victory, through an effective commercial blockade, which had devastating consequences on the vulnerable, undeveloped US economy, and showing how important and effective the strategy of maritime commercial blockade, including of neutral vessels, was, a strategy which, not conceded by the British in this war, continued to be available to Britain in subsequent wars, including those of 1914-18 and 1939-45. Brian Arthur was at the University of Greenwich and was a Caird fellow of the National Maritime Museum, London.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. viii
List of Tablesp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xv
Note on US Dollar/Pound Sterling Conversion Ratesp. xvi
Forewordp. xvii
Prefacep. xxi
Introductionp. 1
Convoys and Blockades: The Evolution of Maritime Economic Warfarep. 6
War at a Distance: Constraints and Solutionsp. 27
From Business Partners to Enemies: Britain and the United States before 1812p. 46
The United States Blockaded: Admiral Warren's 'United Command', August 1812-ApriI 1814p. 64
Blockades and Blunders: Vice-Admiral Cochrane's Command; April 1814-February 1815p. 107
Trade and War: The Effects of Warren's Blockades, August 1812-April 1814p. 131
Captial and Credit: The Impact of the Final Phasep. 161
Results and conclusionp. 204
Epiloguep. 209
Maritime Tablesp. 210
Economic History Tablesp. 227
Notes to the Chaptersp. 251
Bibliographyp. 305
Indexp. 319
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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