Catalogue


Roosevelt's lost alliances : how personal politics helped start the Cold War /
Frank Costigliola.
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2012.
description
viii, 533 p. : ill.
ISBN
069112129X (hbk. : alk. paper), 9780691121291 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2012.
isbn
069112129X (hbk. : alk. paper)
9780691121291 (hbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
A portrait of the allies as young men : Franklin, Winston, and koba -- From Missy to Molotov : the women and men who sustained the Big Three -- The personal touch : forming the alliance, January-August 1941 -- Transcending differences : Eden goes to Moscow and churchill to washington, december 1941 -- Creating the "family circle" : the torturous path to Tehran, 1942-43 -- "I've worked it out": Roosevelt's plan to win the peace and defy death, 1944-45 -- The diplomacy of trauma : Kennan and his colleagues in Moscow, 1933-46 -- Guns and kisses in the Kremlin : ambassadors Harriman and Clark Kerr encounter Stalin, 1943-46 -- "Roosevelt's death has changed everything" : Truman's first days, April-June 1945 -- The lost alliance : widespread anxiety and deepening ideology, July 1945-March 1946 -- Conclusion and epilogue.
catalogue key
8307158
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
PSP Prose Awards, USA, 2012 : Nominated
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This is a terrific book. Fluidly written, cogently argued, and supported by superb research, it addresses a fundamental yet underexamined dimension of both the World War II Grand Alliance and the origins of the Cold War: the personalities as well as the personal relations of Churchill, Stalin, and Roosevelt."--Richard H. Immerman, Temple University "Costigliola has written an important and compelling book. His character portrayals are among the most incisive that have ever been written of the three great wartime leaders. He shows how critical Roosevelt was to the functioning of the alliance and how central his demise was to the origins of the Cold War. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances is a fantastically well researched, wonderfully evocative, stimulating, and significant book."--Melvyn P. Leffler, University of Virginia "A fascinating new history of a past we thought we knew very well already. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances represents a major intervention in the scholarship on World War II and the origins of the Cold War."--Tim Borstelmann, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Flap Copy
"This is a delightful and innovative book. Never before has any book on U.S. foreign relations provided such insightful character sketches. Scholars have long pondered why the best and the brightest went wrong, and now Costigliola offers an explanation: superpower tensions involved more than just misperceptions, divergent ideologies, and grand strategic differences. Personal rivalries, efforts to be in FDR's good graces, parties, and sex of all sort really had a bearing on diplomacy. Costigliola has written a novel masterpiece."--Thomas W. Zeiler, University of Colorado at Boulder "Costigliola pulls back the veil on the personal lives of the major figures of World War II. With great verve and captivating anecdotes, he shows how personal politics helped forge and disrupt international alliances. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances combines innovative research, provocative interpretations, and page-turning prose, providing a fresh take on how gender, emotion, class, and culture shaped the high politics of World War II and the Cold War."--Emily S. Rosenberg, University of California, Irvine "In this imaginative examination of the personal dynamics of the Big Three alliance during World War II, Frank Costigliola brings an important new and intriguing perspective to the origins of the Cold War."--Ronald Steel, author of Walter Lippmann and the American Century "This is a terrific book. Fluidly written, cogently argued, and supported by superb research, it addresses a fundamental yet underexamined dimension of both the World War II Grand Alliance and the origins of the Cold War: the personalities as well as the personal relations of Churchill, Stalin, and Roosevelt."--Richard H. Immerman, Temple University "Costigliola has written an important and compelling book. His character portrayals of the three great wartime leaders are among the most incisive that have ever been written. He shows how critical Roosevelt was to the functioning of the alliance and how central his demise was to the origins of the Cold War. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances is a fantastically well researched, wonderfully evocative, stimulating, and significant book."--Melvyn P. Leffler, University of Virginia "A fascinating new history of a past we thought we knew very well already. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances represents a major intervention in the scholarship on World War II and the origins of the Cold War."--Tim Borstelmann, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Flap Copy
"This is a delightful and innovative book. Never before has any book on U.S. foreign relations provided such insightful character sketches. Scholars have long pondered why the best and the brightest went wrong, and now Costigliola offers an explanation: superpower tensions involved more than just misperceptions, divergent ideologies, and grand strategic differences. Personal rivalries, efforts to be in FDR's good graces, parties, and sex of all sort really had a bearing on diplomacy. Costigliola has written a novel masterpiece."-- Thomas W. Zeiler, University of Colorado at Boulder "Costigliola pulls back the veil on the personal lives of the major figures of World War II. With great verve and captivating anecdotes, he shows how personal politics helped forge and disrupt international alliances. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances combines innovative research, provocative interpretations, and page-turning prose, providing a fresh take on how gender, emotion, class, and culture shaped the high politics of World War II and the Cold War."-- Emily S. Rosenberg, University of California, Irvine "In this imaginative examination of the personal dynamics of the Big Three alliance during World War II, Frank Costigliola brings an important new and intriguing perspective to the origins of the Cold War."-- Ronald Steel, author of Walter Lippmann and the American Century "This is a terrific book. Fluidly written, cogently argued, and supported by superb research, it addresses a fundamental yet underexamined dimension of both the World War II Grand Alliance and the origins of the Cold War: the personalities as well as the personal relations of Churchill, Stalin, and Roosevelt."-- Richard H. Immerman, Temple University "Costigliola has written an important and compelling book. His character portrayals of the three great wartime leaders are among the most incisive that have ever been written. He shows how critical Roosevelt was to the functioning of the alliance and how central his demise was to the origins of the Cold War. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances is a fantastically well researched, wonderfully evocative, stimulating, and significant book."-- Melvyn P. Leffler, University of Virginia "A fascinating new history of a past we thought we knew very well already. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances represents a major intervention in the scholarship on World War II and the origins of the Cold War."-- Tim Borstelmann, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Flap Copy
"Costigliola pulls back the veil on the personal lives of the major figures of World War II. With great verve and captivating anecdotes, he shows how personal politics helped forge and disrupt international alliances. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances combines innovative research, provocative interpretations, and page-turning prose, providing a fresh take on how gender, emotion, class, and culture shaped the high politics of World War II and the Cold War."--Emily S. Rosenberg, University of California, Irvine "In this imaginative examination of the personal dynamics of the Big Three alliance during World War II, Frank Costigliola brings an important new and intriguing perspective to the origins of the Cold War."--Ronald Steel, author of Walter Lippmann and the American Century "This is a terrific book. Fluidly written, cogently argued, and supported by superb research, it addresses a fundamental yet underexamined dimension of both the World War II Grand Alliance and the origins of the Cold War: the personalities as well as the personal relations of Churchill, Stalin, and Roosevelt."--Richard H. Immerman, Temple University "Costigliola has written an important and compelling book. His character portrayals of the three great wartime leaders are among the most incisive that have ever been written. He shows how critical Roosevelt was to the functioning of the alliance and how central his demise was to the origins of the Cold War. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances is a fantastically well researched, wonderfully evocative, stimulating, and significant book."--Melvyn P. Leffler, University of Virginia "A fascinating new history of a past we thought we knew very well already. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances represents a major intervention in the scholarship on World War II and the origins of the Cold War."--Tim Borstelmann, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Flap Copy
"Costigliola pulls back the veil on the personal lives of the major figures of World War II. With great verve and captivating anecdotes, he shows how personal politics helped forge and disrupt international alliances. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances combines innovative research, provocative interpretations, and page-turning prose, providing a fresh take on how gender, emotion, class, and culture shaped the high politics of World War II and the Cold War."--Emily S. Rosenberg, University of California, Irvine "In this imaginative examination of the personal dynamics of the Big Three alliance during World War II, Frank Costigliola brings an important new and intriguing perspective to the origins of the Cold War."--Ronald Steel, author of Walter Lippmann and the American Century "This is a terrific book. Fluidly written, cogently argued, and supported by superb research, it addresses a fundamental yet underexamined dimension of both the World War II Grand Alliance and the origins of the Cold War: the personalities as well as the personal relations of Churchill, Stalin, and Roosevelt."--Richard H. Immerman, Temple University "Costigliola has written an important and compelling book. His character portrayals are among the most incisive that have ever been written of the three great wartime leaders. He shows how critical Roosevelt was to the functioning of the alliance and how central his demise was to the origins of the Cold War. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances is a fantastically well researched, wonderfully evocative, stimulating, and significant book."--Melvyn P. Leffler, University of Virginia "A fascinating new history of a past we thought we knew very well already. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances represents a major intervention in the scholarship on World War II and the origins of the Cold War."--Tim Borstelmann, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-07-01:
In his analysis of the creation of the Allied partnership during WW II and its dissolution soon thereafter, Costigliola (Univ. of Connecticut) explores the lives and personalities of Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Josef Stalin, and Harry Truman (as well as these leaders' main advisers) and the culturally conditioned emotions that formed their perceptions. By emphasizing FDR's predominant role in forging and maintaining the alliance, as well as the demise of the coalition as a consequence of Roosevelt's death, the author presents a classic argument for the "great man" view of history. Simply put, the Cold War was not inevitable, but derived from Truman's unraveling of the human connections made by Roosevelt and his diplomatic team. This well-written work, based on extensive use of the private papers, personal correspondence, and published memoirs of the major participants, provides an interesting perspective on the wartime alliance and the origins of the Cold War, guaranteed to spark discussion. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. K. J. Volanto Collin College
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-11-01:
Costigliola (history, Univ. of Connecticut) describes the functional alliance among the big three-Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin-during World War II and how, after Roosevelt's death, it was undermined by smaller "alliances" among FDR's couriers. Churchill is presented as an unchanging warrior and colonialist, whereas Stalin is portrayed not as a conventional madman but a "realist" who, despite his brutality, sought secure borders, internal order, modernization, and respect for the Soviet Union. FDR is pictured as being in reasonable health at Yalta and not bamboozled by Stalin. The three forged a pragmatic relationship in which their nations would police the world via the Security Council of the United Nations. Yet the author argues that FDR was too demanding of his top assistants; once FDR was out of the picture, his assistants formed new alliances with and were able to manipulate Truman, whom FDR had never taken seriously as his vice president. VERDICT This book offers a provocative psychological thesis on leadership and diplomacy that contributes to understanding the origins of the Cold War. It will appeal to scholars and general readers interested in the transition of the Allies from World War II to the Cold War. Highly recommended.-William D. Pederson, Louisiana State Univ.-Shreveport (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This well-written work, based on extensive use of the private papers, personal correspondence, and published memoirs of the major participants, provides an interesting perspective on the wartime alliance and the origins of the Cold War, guaranteed to spark discussion."-- Choice
Winner of the 2013 Robert H. Ferrell Book Prize, Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations Honorable Mention for the 2012 Award for Best Professional/Scholarly Book in U.S. History, Association of American Publishers
This book offers a provocative psychological thesis on leadership and diplomacy that contributes to understanding the origins of the Cold War. It will appeal to scholars and general readers interested in the transition of the Allies from World War II to the Cold War. Highly recommended. -- Library Journal
"This book offers a provocative psychological thesis on leadership and diplomacy that contributes to understanding the origins of the Cold War. It will appeal to scholars and general readers interested in the transition of the Allies from World War II to the Cold War. Highly recommended."-- Library Journal (starred review)
This well-written work, based on extensive use of the private papers, personal correspondence, and published memoirs of the major participants, provides an interesting perspective on the wartime alliance and the origins of the Cold War, guaranteed to spark discussion.
This book offers a provocative psychological thesis on leadership and diplomacy that contributes to understanding the origins of the Cold War. It will appeal to scholars and general readers interested in the transition of the Allies from World War II to the Cold War. Highly recommended.
The premise that 'the Cold War was not inevitable' launches this penetrating, personality-focused exploration of its WWII roots and the late 20th century conflict whose aftershocks are still being felt today. Costigliola (Awkward Dominion) is deft in his characterization of the Big Three: Churchill--boyish, flamboyant, and thrilled by armed conflict; Stalin--a piercingly intelligent former seminarian capable of merciless brutality for the sake of a cause; and FDR--the fulcrum, a blue-blooded trickster willing both to humor Churchill's nude effusiveness as a guest in the White House and win at Yalta the honest admiration of the insecure Stalin. With all the trappings of a dramatic HBO series (sex, intrigue, hierarchy, and global and historical resonance) Costigliola dutifully traces the reasons Roosevelt's vision of three (or four) world policemen committed to global stability failed to win out in the post-war near-term. -- Publishers Weekly
The premise that 'the Cold War was not inevitable' launches this penetrating, personality-focused exploration of its WWII roots and the late 20th century conflict whose aftershocks are still being felt today. Costigliola (Awkward Dominion) is deft in his characterization of the Big Three: Churchill--boyish, flamboyant, and thrilled by armed conflict; Stalin--a piercingly intelligent former seminarian capable of merciless brutality for the sake of a cause; and FDR--the fulcrum, a blue-blooded trickster willing both to humor Churchill's nude effusiveness as a guest in the White House and win at Yalta the honest admiration of the insecure Stalin. With all the trappings of a dramatic HBO series (sex, intrigue, hierarchy, and global and historical resonance) Costigliola dutifully traces the reasons Roosevelt's vision of three (or four) world policemen committed to global stability failed to win out in the post-war near-term.
The premise that 'the Cold War was not inevitable' launches this penetrating, personality-focused exploration of its WWII roots and the late 20th century conflict whose aftershocks are still being felt today. Costigliola ( Awkward Dominion ) is deft in his characterization of the Big Three: Churchill--boyish, flamboyant, and thrilled by armed conflict; Stalin--a piercingly intelligent former seminarian capable of merciless brutality for the sake of a cause; and FDR--the fulcrum, a blue-blooded trickster willing both to humor Churchill's nude effusiveness as a guest in the White House and win at Yalta the honest admiration of the insecure Stalin. With all the trappings of a dramatic HBO series (sex, intrigue, hierarchy, and global and historical resonance) Costigliola dutifully traces the reasons Roosevelt's vision of three (or four) world policemen committed to global stability failed to win out in the post-war near-term.
In Roosevelt's Lost Alliances Costigliola deploys a finely tuned methodology to produce a learned and satisfying histoire totale of the inner workings of the Big Three wartime alliance and the reasons for its demise. He re-examines familiar material in the light of new questions and draws on previously ignored or under-utilized sources, of which the ones by women are especially important.
"In Roosevelt's Lost Alliances Costigliola deploys a finely tuned methodology to produce a learned and satisfying histoire totale of the inner workings of the Big Three wartime alliance and the reasons for its demise. He re-examines familiar material in the light of new questions and draws on previously ignored or under-utilized sources, of which the ones by women are especially important."-- Michaela Hoenicke Moore, H-Diplo
" Roosevelt's Lost Alliances is an important and well-written book. Not because it recounts familiar events, but because it is able to examine the main figures from a new perspective and, by doing so, can demonstrate how important personal views, cultural differences, and mutual misunderstanding were in the onset of the Cold War."-- Eszterh?zy K?roly College, Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies
"Even with 60 years of writing on the Cold War's origins behind us, Roosevelt's Lost Alliances can boast of a novel thesis."-- Jordan Michael Smith, BostonGlobe.com
Even with 60 years of writing on the Cold War's origins behind us, Roosevelt's Lost Alliances can boast of a novel thesis. -- Jordan Michael Smith, BostonGlobe.com
Every so often appears a new publication that demonstrates the complexities of the historian's craft and reminds professionals that their scholarly pursuits--no matter how evenhanded, rational, or seemingly definitive--must ultimately land somewhere between art and science. So is the case with Frank Costigliola's engaging and thought-provoking new study of 'personal politics.'
"Every so often appears a new publication that demonstrates the complexities of the historian's craft and reminds professionals that their scholarly pursuits--no matter how evenhanded, rational, or seemingly definitive--must ultimately land somewhere between art and science. So is the case with Frank Costigliola's engaging and thought-provoking new study of 'personal politics.'"-- Steven M. George, 49th Parallel
"Costigliola's rich and incisive analysis will vastly deepen our understanding of the imponderables surrounding the perhaps most crucial phase of the twentieth century."-- Klaus Schwabe, Diplomatic History
Even with 60 years of writing on the Cold War's origins behind us, Roosevelt's Lost Alliances can boast of a novel thesis.
Among its many contributions, Costigliola's impressive book reminds us that the emotional truths of the earlier Cold Warriors' positions will be forever undermined by the costs and scars of the conflict they helped to set in motion.
"Among its many contributions, Costigliola's impressive book reminds us that the emotional truths of the earlier Cold Warriors' positions will be forever undermined by the costs and scars of the conflict they helped to set in motion."-- Hannah Gurman, American Historical Review
As an exercise in wedge revisionism, Costigliola advances a powerful viewpoint, albeit one he might have couched with more shading and less certitude.
"As an exercise in wedge revisionism, Costigliola advances a powerful viewpoint, albeit one he might have couched with more shading and less certitude."-- Newark Star-Ledger
As an exercise in wedge revisionism, Costigliola advances a powerful viewpoint, albeit one he might have couched with more shading and less certitude. -- Newark Star-Ledger
"Costigliola's is a brave thesis, premised upon many years of fine scholarship, that will enrich our understanding of this crucial period of history. It will provoke much debate and deserves to be widely read."-- Alan P. Dobson, Historian
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, November 2011
Kirkus Reviews, February 2012
PW Annex Reviews, February 2012
Choice, July 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In the spring of 1945, as the Allied victory in Europe was approaching, the shape of the postwar world hinged on the personal politics and flawed personalities of Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances captures this moment and shows how FDR crafted a winning coalition by overcoming the different habits, upbringings, sympathies, and past experiences of the three leaders. In particular, Roosevelt trained his famous charm on Stalin, lavishing respect on him, salving his insecurities, and rendering him more amenable to compromise on some matters. Yet, even as he pursued a lasting peace, FDR was alienating his own intimate circle of advisers and becoming dangerously isolated. After his death, postwar cooperation depended on Harry Truman, who, with very different sensibilities, heeded the embittered "Soviet experts" his predecessor had kept distant. A Grand Alliance was painstakingly built and carelessly lost. The Cold War was by no means inevitable. This landmark study brings to light key overlooked documents, such as the Yalta diary of Roosevelt's daughter Anna; the intimate letters of Roosevelt's de facto chief of staff, Missy LeHand; and the wiretap transcripts of estranged adviser Harry Hopkins. With a gripping narrative and subtle analysis, Roosevelt's Lost Alliances lays out a new approach to foreign relations history. Frank Costigliola highlights the interplay between national political interests and more contingent factors, such as the personalities of leaders and the culturally conditioned emotions forming their perceptions and driving their actions. Foreign relations flowed from personal politics--a lesson pertinent to historians, diplomats, and citizens alike.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study brings to light key overlooked documents, such as the Yalta diary of Roosevelt's daughter Anna; the intimate letters of Roosevelt's de facto chief of staff, Missy LeHand; and the wiretap transcripts of estranged advisor Harry Hopkins. The book lays out a new approach to foreign relations history.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
A Portrait of the Allies as Young Men: Franklin, Winston, and Kobap. 21
From Missy to Molotov: The Women and Men Who Sustained the Big Threep. 58
The Personal Touch: Forming the Alliance, January-August 1941p. 97
Transcending Differences: Eden Goes to Moscow and Churchill to Washington, December 1941p. 141
Creating the "Family Circle": The Tortuous Path to Tehran, 1942-43p. 163
"Fve Worked It Out": Roosevelt's Plan to Win the Peace and Defy Death, 1944-45p. 205
The Diplomacy of Trauma: Kennan and His Colleagues in Moscow, 1933-46p. 259
Guns and Kisses in the Kremlin: Ambassadors Harriman and Clark Kerr Encounter Stalin, 1943-46p. 291
"Roosevelt's Death Has Changed Everything": Truman's First Days, April-June 1945p. 312
The Lost Alliance: Widespread Anxiety and Deepening Ideology, July 1945-March 1946p. 359
Conclusion and Epiloguep. 418
Acknowledgmentsp. 429
Bibliographical Notep. 433
Notesp. 437
Indexp. 523
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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