Catalogue


Illinois in the War of 1812 /
Gillum Ferguson.
imprint
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2012.
description
xiii, 349 p.
ISBN
0252036743 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780252036743 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2012.
isbn
0252036743 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780252036743 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8303804
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [309]-331) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-09-01:
Ferguson has written a history not only of the Illinois Territory during the War of 1812 but also of the region's settlement and development by white Americans in the early 1800s. Paying thorough attention to both Indian and white peoples, the author describes the conflicts that erupted in the vast Illinois Territory (from the western Great Lakes to the junction of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers) as whites became an increasing threat to Native lands and livelihoods. These conflicts were subsumed into the War of 1812, as Indians, Americans, and British jockeyed for supremacy in the Great Lakes and the Mississippi Valley. Ferguson argues that the war became the crucible of statehood for Illinois. The US victory was devastating for Natives, who had allied themselves with the British to preserve their sovereignty. With the Native "threat" dissipated, a new flood of white settlement meant statehood for Illinois. The legacy of this violent period remained, however. Wartime atrocities created a climate of violence and racism that ultimately led to the near-complete expulsion of Indian peoples from Illinois. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. K. M. Gannon Grand View University
Appeared in Library Journal on 2012-02-15:
In the pantheon of books published on U.S. conflicts, the War of 1812 has often been overlooked but has come to the fore because of its bicentennial. Rather than surveying the entire war, Illinois independent historian Ferguson examines the Illinois Territory, which encompassed present-day Illinois and Wisconsin, along with portions of Michigan and Minnesota. In the Illinois frontier, the combatants were primarily local militias combating Native American groups. Although presented as an Illinois story, the obvious influence of William Henry Harrison and Tenskwatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, throughout the text suggests that events in the Illinois Territory were not unique to that locale, but were instead an extension of the war raging between native groups led by Tecumseh and his brother Tenskwatawa and U.S. forces commanded by future President William Henry Harrison in the neighboring Indiana Territory. VERDICT This monograph is recommended for all readers interested in the War of 1812 from the perspective of the frontier regions of the Old Northwest. It should be read alongside Adam Jortner's The Gods of Prophetstown: The Battle of Tippecanoe and the Holy War for the American Frontier, which is an excellent joint biography of William Henry Harrison and Tenskwatawa.-John Burch, Campbellsville Univ. Lib., KY (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A thorough, engaging, and extremely useful narrative analysis."-- Journal of the Early Republic "Ferguson underlines the crucial importance of the War of 1812 in development of Illinois as a State."-- The Long Star Book Review
"For more than a century, there has been no book-length historical study of the War of 1812 in Illinois, but Gillum Ferguson has labored mightily to remedy that historiographical shortcoming. Massively researched and well written, Illinois in the War of 1812 is a pioneering work that will undeniably appeal to scholars, local historians, and interested readers."--Rodney O. Davis, coeditor of The Lincoln-Douglas Debates: The Lincoln Studies Center Edition
"For more than a century, there has been no book-length historical study of the War of 1812 in Illinois, but Gillum Ferguson has labored mightily to remedy that historiographical shortcoming. Massively researched and well written, Illinois in the War of 1812 is a pioneering work that will undeniably appeal to scholars, local historians, and interested readers." Rodney O. Davis, co-editor of The Lincoln-Douglas Debates: The Lincoln Studies Center Edition "Often referred to as the 'forgotten' war, the War of 1812 was in fact the final chapter of our country's war for independence. This indispensible history commemorating our nation's early history will engage scholars as well as lay readers." James A. DeGroff Jr., President-elect, Illinois Society of the War of 1812
"For more than a century, there has been no book-length historical study of the War of 1812 in Illinois, but Gillum Ferguson has labored mightily to remedy that historiographical shortcoming. Massively researched and well written, Illinois in the War of 1812 is a pioneering work that will undeniably appeal to scholars, local historians, and interested readers." Rodney O. Davis, co-editor of The Lincoln-Douglas Debates: The Lincoln Studies Center Edition"Often referred to as the 'forgotten' war, the War of 1812 was in fact the final chapter of our country's war for independence. This indispensible history commemorating our nation's early history will engage scholars as well as lay readers." James A. DeGroff Jr., President-elect, Illinois Society of the War of 1812
" Illinois in the War of 1812 does a superb job of collecting and presenting the events of the War of 1812 in the territory that would become the state of Illinois. This collection's use of sources excels anything I've seen during my extensive research of this time period."--William D. Wilson, Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission
"Often referred to as the 'forgotten' war, the War of 1812 was in fact the final chapter of our country's war for independence. This indispensable history commemorating our nation's early history will engage scholars as well as lay readers."--James A. DeGroff Jr., President-elect, Illinois Society of the War of 1812
"Often referred to as the 'forgotten' war, the War of 1812 was in fact the final chapter of our country's war for independence. This indispensable history commemorating our nation's early history will engage scholars as well as lay readers."--James A. DeGroff Jr., President-elect, Illinois Society of the War of 1812 "For more than a century, there has been no book-length historical study of the War of 1812 in Illinois, but Gillum Ferguson has labored mightily to remedy that historiographical shortcoming. Massively researched and well written, Illinois in the War of 1812 is a pioneering work that will undeniably appeal to scholars, local historians, and interested readers."--Rodney O. Davis, coeditor of The Lincoln-Douglas Debates: The Lincoln Studies Center Edition
"Recommended for all readers interested in the War of 1812 from the perspective of the frontier regions of the Old Northwest."-- Library Journal "A nicely crafted book that makes an important contribution to both the historiography of the Illinois Territory and the War of 1812."-- Journal of Illinois History
"Recommended for all readers interested in the War of 1812 from the perspective of the frontier regions of the Old Northwest."-- Library Journal "For more than a century, there has been no book-length historical study of the War of 1812 in Illinois, but Gillum Ferguson has labored mightily to remedy that historiographical shortcoming. Massively researched and well written, Illinois in the War of 1812 is a pioneering work that will undeniably appeal to scholars, local historians, and interested readers."--Rodney O. Davis, coeditor of The Lincoln-Douglas Debates: The Lincoln Studies Center Edition
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, February 2012
Choice, September 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
On the eve of the War of 1812, the Illinois Territory was a new land of bright promise. Split off from Indiana Territory in 1809, the new territory ran from the junction of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers north to the U.S. border with Canada, embracing the current states of Illinois, Wisconsin, and a part of Michigan. The extreme southern part of the region was rich in timber, but the dominant feature of the landscape was the vast tall grass prairie that stretched without major interruption from Lake Michigan for more than three hundred miles to the south. The territory was largely inhabited by Indians: Sauk, Potawatomi, Kickapoo, and others. By 1812, however, pioneer farmers had gathered in the wooded fringes around prime agricultural land, looking out over the prairies with longing and trepidation. Six years later, a populous Illinois was confident enough to seek and receive admission as a state in the Union. What had intervened was the War of 1812, in which white settlers faced both Indians resistant to their encroachments and British forces poised to seize control of the upper Mississippi and Great Lakes. The war ultimately broke the power and morale of the Indian tribes and deprived them of the support of their ally, Great Britain. Sometimes led by skillful tacticians, at other times by blundering looters who got lost in the tall grass, the combatants showed each other little mercy. Until and even after the war was concluded by the Treaty of Ghent in 1814, there were massacres by both sides, laying the groundwork for later betrayal of friendly and hostile tribes alike and for ultimate expulsion of the Indians from the new state of Illinois. In this engrossing new history, published upon the war's bicentennial, Gillum Ferguson underlines the crucial importance of the War of 1812 in the development of Illinois as a state. The history of Illinois in the War of 1812 has never before been told with so much attention to the personalities who fought it, the events that defined it, and its lasting consequences. Endorsed by the Illinois Society of the War of 1812 and the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission.
Main Description
On the eve of the War of 1812, the Illinois Territory was a new land of bright promise. The new territory ran from the junction of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers north to the U.S. border with Canada, embracing the current states of Illinois and Wisconsin, together with a part of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. By 1812 immigrant farmers had gathered in the wooded fringes around prime agricultural land, looking out over the prairies with longing and trepidation. Six years later, Illinois was populous and confident enough to seek and receive admission as a state in the Union. What had intervened was the War of 1812, which ultimately broke the power and morale of the Indian tribes and deprived them of the support of their ally, Great Britain. Until the war was concluded by the Treaty of Ghent in 1817, there were massacres by both sides, setting a tone for later betrayal of friendly tribes and continued attacks against Indians throughout the territory. In this engrossing new history, published upon the war's bicentennial, Gillum Ferguson underlines the crucial importance of the War of 1812 in the development of Illinois as a state. The history of Illinois in the War of 1812 has never before been told with as much attention to the personalities who fought it, the events that defined it, and its lasting consequences. Gilum Ferguson is an attorney practicing in Naperville, Illinois. His articles have appeared in The Journal of Illinois History, The Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Illinois Bar Journal , and other journals.
Main Description
On the eve of the War of 1812, the Illinois Territory was a new land of bright promise. The new territory ran from the junction of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers north to the U.S. border with Canada, embracing the current states of Illinois, Wisconsin, and a part of Michigan. By 1812 pioneer farmers had gathered in the wooded fringes around prime agricultural land, looking out over the prairies with longing and trepidation. Six years later, a populous Illinois was confident enough to seek and receive admission as a state in the Union. What had intervened was the War of 1812, which ultimately broke the power and morale of the Indian tribes and deprived them of the support of their ally, Great Britain. Until and even after the war was concluded by the Treaty of Ghent in 1814, there were massacres by both sides, laying the groundwork for later betrayal of friendly and hostile tribes alike and for ultimate expulsion of the Indians from the new state of Illinois. In this engrossing new history, published upon the war's bicentennial, Gillum Ferguson underlines the crucial importance of the War of 1812 in the development of Illinois as a state. The history of Illinois in the War of 1812 has never before been told with so much attention to the personalities who fought it, the events that defined it, and its lasting consequences.
Main Description
Russell P. Strange "Book of the Year" Award from the Illinois State Historical Society, 2012. On the eve of the War of 1812, the Illinois Territory was a new land of bright promise. Split off from Indiana Territory in 1809, the new territory ran from the junction of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers north to the U.S. border with Canada, embracing the current states of Illinois, Wisconsin, and a part of Michigan. The extreme southern part of the region was rich in timber, but the dominant feature of the landscape was the vast tall grass prairie that stretched without major interruption from Lake Michigan for more than three hundred miles to the south. The territory was largely inhabited by Indians: Sauk, Potawatomi, Kickapoo, and others. By 1812, however, pioneer farmers had gathered in the wooded fringes around prime agricultural land, looking out over the prairies with longing and trepidation. Six years later, a populous Illinois was confident enough to seek and receive admission as a state in the Union. What had intervened was the War of 1812, in which white settlers faced both Indians resistant to their encroachments and British forces poised to seize control of the upper Mississippi and Great Lakes. The war ultimately broke the power and morale of the Indian tribes and deprived them of the support of their ally, Great Britain. Sometimes led by skillful tacticians, at other times by blundering looters who got lost in the tall grass, the combatants showed each other little mercy. Until and even after the war was concluded by the Treaty of Ghent in 1814, there were massacres by both sides, laying the groundwork for later betrayal of friendly and hostile tribes alike and for ultimate expulsion of the Indians from the new state of Illinois. In this engrossing new history, published upon the war's bicentennial, Gillum Ferguson underlines the crucial importance of the War of 1812 in the development of Illinois as a state. The history of Illinois in the War of 1812 has never before been told with so much attention to the personalities who fought it, the events that defined it, and its lasting consequences. Endorsed by the Illinois Society of the War of 1812 and the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Morningp. 1
Eveningp. 16
Rumors of Warp. 30
Chicagop. 55
Peoriap. 79
Dickson and Forsythp. 98
Edwardsp. 115
Howardp. 131
Clarkp. 147
Headwindsp. 161
Peace?p. 184
Notesp. 209
Bibliographyp. 309
Indexp. 333
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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