Catalogue


1001 ways to take initiative at work /
by Bob Nelson ; illustrated by Matt Wawiorka.
imprint
New York : Workman Publishing, 1999.
description
xv, 240 p. ill. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
076111405X (alk. paper), 9780761114055
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Workman Publishing, 1999.
isbn
076111405X (alk. paper)
9780761114055
general note
Includes indexes.
catalogue key
8295028
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
Introduction to Part I Employees who make the personal decision to strive for something more than just the status quo are the lifeblood of every successful organization today. Taking initiative is a key ingredient in making improvements at work, dealing with change, and providing customers with service that is far beyond their expectations. Initiative is personal: the individual controls when, where, and how much initiative to take on the job. Even though its impact may be felt throughout an organization, initiative starts with the employee--and what he or she can do on a daily basis. In a recent online survey by iVillage.com, employees were asked, "What is most important for getting ahead in the workplace?" Of the 7,760 people who cast their votes, 55 percent said that "initiative" is most important, followed by "inspiration" (17 percent), "intelligence" (16 percent), and "political savvy" (12 percent). (Comments about initiative taken from this survey are presented throughout this book.) Although employees often recognize the importance of taking initiative, they may be hesitant to do so. Part I provides both ideas and inspiration for taking initiative on the job to overcome obstacles--real or perceived--that may be holding you back. The chapters that follow provide a detailed overview of how you can take initiative, and in the process make a difference where you work. Whether it's tapping your inner creativity, taking needed action on a persistent problem, capitalizing on opportunities as they become available, or thinking up ways to improve your current work environment, the act of taking initiative will undoubtedly reenergize you, in addition to making your job much better and your organization more efficient and effective. By taking initiative, all employees can elevate their visibility within an organization and greatly improve their chances for recognition, learning, growth, pay raises, bonuses, and advancement for good performance. By focusing on what you can rather than can't do, and emphasizing possibilities in your own sphere of influence, you'll increase your chances to not only have greater impact at work but develop your skills on a local basis before you apply them to a wider arena and obtain more lasting changes in your department, division, or organization.
First Chapter
Introduction to Part I

Employees who make the personal decision to strive for something more than just the status quo are the lifeblood of every successful organization today. Taking initiative is a key ingredient in making improvements at work, dealing with change, and providing customers with service that is far beyond their expectations.

Initiative is personal: the individual controls when, where, and how much initiative to take on the job. Even though its impact may be felt throughout an organization, initiative starts with the employee--and what he or she can do on a daily basis.

In a recent online survey by iVillage.com, employees were asked, "What is most important for getting ahead in the workplace?" Of the 7,760 people who cast their votes, 55 percent said that "initiative" is most important, followed by "inspiration" (17 percent), "intelligence" (16 percent), and "political savvy" (12 percent). (Comments about initiative taken from this survey are presented throughout this book.)

Although employees often recognize the importance of taking initiative, they may be hesitant to do so. Part I provides both ideas and inspiration for taking initiative on the job to overcome obstacles--real or perceived--that may be holding you back.

The chapters that follow provide a detailed overview of how you can take initiative, and in the process make a difference where you work. Whether it's tapping your inner creativity, taking needed action on a persistent problem, capitalizing on opportunities as they become available, or thinking up ways to improve your current work environment, the act of taking initiative will undoubtedly reenergize you, in addition to making your job much better and your organization more efficient and effective. By taking initiative, all employees can elevate their visibility within an organization and greatly improve their chances for recognition, learning, growth, pay raises, bonuses, and advancement for good performance.

By focusing on what you can rather than can't do, and emphasizing possibilities in your own sphere of influence, you'll increase your chances to not only have greater impact at work but develop your skills on a local basis before you apply them to a wider arena and obtain more lasting changes in your department, division, or organization.

Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club 81,000 copies in print
Unpaid Annotation
Weaving together case studies, examples, quotes, research highlights, and the author's own "Tool Box" of management techniques and exercises, this practical handbook shows readers how to develop self-leadership, set goals, create learning opportunities, take risks, build a team, sell ideas, and work both within and outside the larger organization.
Publisher Fact Sheet
The first management book for employees. This practical handbook is full of ideas for getting the most from your job & advancing yourself within the company. The book weaves together case studies, examples, quotes, research highlights & the author's own tool box of management techniques to help readers create self-leadership, develop & sell an idea & build support from top management.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Using case studies, examples, quotes, and exercises, this is a practical handbook about managing up - about employees taking ownership of their jobs, whether it's an assistant working for a manager or a VP working for the CEO.
Unpaid Annotation
Here is the first management book for employees. Weaving together case studies, examples, quotes, research highlights, and the author's own "Tool Box" of management techniques and exercises, this practical handbook will show every reader how to develop self-leadership, set goals, and create learning opportunities.
Publisher Fact Sheet
This practical handbook is full of ideas for getting the most from your job & advancing yourself within the company. The book weaves together case studies, examples, quotes, research highlights & the author's own tool box of management techniques to help readers create self-leadership, develop & sell an idea & build support from top management.
Back Cover Copy
Bob Nelson has done it again! In this practical, timely book, he describes what employees can do to take more initiative in any job. Any employee (and supervisor, manager or owner) will find this book of enormous value! - Dr. Dean Spitzer, senior consultant, IBM Corporation, and author of SuperMotivation"Bob Nelson's book shows how employees who take initiative not only create value for their organizations, but for themselves personally and professionally." - Dieter Huckestein, President, Hotel Division, Hilton Hotels CorporationWhether you're an entry-level assistant or a VP working with the CEO, there's only one person responsible for your career--you. And here to help you realize your potential for success is management guru Bob Nelson, bestselling author of the 1001 Ways series. A unique motivational manual, 1001 Ways to Take Initiative at Work brings together hundreds of real-life examples, advice from business leaders, and the author's own techniques and exercises to show readers how to draw on inner creativity, develop self-leadership, set goals, take risks, and sell ideas."The biggest mistake you can make in life is to think you work for somebody else." -- Bob NelsonTAKE ACTION--Elaine Crawford, a secretary at Johnsonville Foods, discovers an overlooked market segment, figures out how to reach it, pushers her idea through, and now runs a $3 million mail-order department.QUESTION AUTHORITY--Feeling that the corporation is poorly managed, IBM programmer Jay Elliot writes a 20-page detailed letter to chairman Tom Watson, Jr.--and his career skyrockets.THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX--Frustrated by bookmarks that keep falling out of his hymnal on Sundays, 3M engineer Art Fry creates the Post-It, today a $300 million business.TRUST YOUR INTUITION--While still an administrative assistant at Zerox, Joanne Griffin senses opportunity in a project no one wants, directs a team to implement it, and is today a corporate Vice President of Enterprise Rent-A-Car.
Back Cover Copy
Bob Nelson has done it again! In this practical, timely book, he describes what employees can do to take more initiative in any job. Any employee (and supervisor, manager or owner) will find this book of enormous value! - Dr. Dean Spitzer, senior consultant, IBM Corporation, and author of SuperMotivation "Bob Nelson's book shows how employees who take initiative not only create value for their organizations, but for themselves personally and professionally." - Dieter Huckestein, President, Hotel Division, Hilton Hotels Corporation Whether you're an entry-level assistant or a VP working with the CEO, there's only one person responsible for your career--you. And here to help you realize your potential for success is management guru Bob Nelson, bestselling author of the 1001 Ways series. A unique motivational manual, 1001 Ways to Take Initiative at Work brings together hundreds of real-life examples, advice from business leaders, and the author's own techniques and exercises to show readers how to draw on inner creativity, develop self-leadership, set goals, take risks, and sell ideas. "The biggest mistake you can make in life is to think you work for somebody else." -- Bob Nelson TAKE ACTION--Elaine Crawford, a secretary at Johnsonville Foods, discovers an overlooked market segment, figures out how to reach it, pushers her idea through, and now runs a $3 million mail-order department. QUESTION AUTHORITY--Feeling that the corporation is poorly managed, IBM programmer Jay Elliot writes a 20-page detailed letter to chairman Tom Watson, Jr.--and his career skyrockets. THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX--Frustrated by bookmarks that keep falling out of his hymnal on Sundays, 3M engineer Art Fry creates the Post-It, today a $300 million business. TRUST YOUR INTUITION--While still an administrative assistant at Zerox, Joanne Griffin senses opportunity in a project no one wants, directs a team to implement it, and is today a corporate Vice President of Enterprise Rent-A-Car.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. vii
Prefacep. xiii
You and Your Jobp. 1
Thinking Outside the Boxp. 3
Be Your Own Boss: Seeing the Big Picturep. 8
Toolbox: Unleashing Employee Innovation and Creativityp. 15
Take Action Now! Personal Attributes for Initiativep. 17
Doing Your Homeworkp. 19
Be Your Own Boss: Learn from Your Mistakesp. 21
Toolbox: Systematic Problem Solvingp. 25
Take Action Now! Identifying Your Organization's Culture, Values, and Normsp. 27
Taking Action/Capitalizing on Opportunitiesp. 28
Be Your Own Boss: Taking Responsibility for Your Actionsp. 30
Toolbox: Attitude and Balance Are Important to Taking Actionp. 37
Take Action Now! Tips for Being in Chargep. 46
Making Improvementsp. 47
Be Your Own Boss: How to Make Suggestions Countp. 49
Toolbox: Selling Your Ideas to Othersp. 54
Perseverance and Persistencep. 63
Be Your Own Boss: Choosing Your Peaks and Valleysp. 65
Toolbox: Managing Your Timep. 68
Take Action Now! Persistence Pays Offp. 72
You and Othersp. 73
Leadership and Influencep. 75
Toolbox: The Five Sources of Power and How to Use Themp. 77
Be Your Own Boss: What Makes a Leader?p. 79
Take Action Now! Leaders Influence Actionsp. 88
Communication/Networkingp. 89
Be Your Own Boss: How to Get Others to Help Youp. 93
Toolbox: How to Have Influence in Meetingsp. 96
Take Action Now! Communication and Networking Tipsp. 100
Managing Upp. 101
Be Your Own Boss: How to Say No: A Storyp. 104
Take Action Now! Secrets to Managing Upp. 112
Working in Teamsp. 113
Be Your Own Boss: Deciding What's Importantp. 116
Toolbox: Empowering Teamsp. 118
Take Action Now! Tips for Teamworkp. 124
Above and Beyondp. 125
Be Your Own Boss: Putting Yourself in Your Customer's Shoesp. 128
Toolbox: Naive Listeningp. 138
Take Action Now! Delivering Above and Beyond Servicep. 146
Your Career and Your Lifep. 147
Taking Charge of Your Careerp. 149
Be Your Own Boss: How to Improve Your Marketabilityp. 152
Toolbox: Networking Made Easyp. 156
Toolbox: How to Ask for a Raisep. 160
Take Action Now! Planning for Advancementp. 176
Learning and Educationp. 177
Be Your Own Boss: Deciding Your Career's Workp. 181
Toolbox: Ten Great Ways to Learn at Workp. 182
Take Action Now! Life-Long Learningp. 186
Developing Skills on the Jobp. 187
Be Your Own Boss: Expressing Your Opportunity Interestp. 190
Toolbox: Cultivating a Mentorp. 192
Overcoming Obstaclesp. 194
Be Your Own Boss: Seeing Challenges as Opportunitiesp. 195
Toolbox: Balancing Work and Familyp. 196
Take Action Now! Strategies for Taking Initiativep. 203
Career Optionsp. 204
Be Your Own Boss: Constantly Search for Your Next Jobp. 207
Toolbox: Simplifying Your Lifep. 210
Take Action Now! Unlimited Opportunityp. 215
Appendixesp. 219
Index to Innovatorsp. 221
Index to Featured Companiesp. 224
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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