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The Acadian diaspora : an eighteenth-century history /
Christopher Hodson.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
description
xi, 260 p.
ISBN
0199739773 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780199739776 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
isbn
0199739773 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780199739776 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : the worlds of the Acadian diaspora -- The expulsion -- The pariahs -- The tropics -- The unknown -- The homeland -- The conspiracy -- Conclusion : the ends of the Acadian diaspora.
catalogue key
8294790
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-01-01:
What happened to the Acadians? Hodson (Brigham Young Univ.) recounts their expulsion from Nova Scotia briefly: some seven thousand Acadians suspected of sedition were forcibly removed from their homes on the Bay of Fundy and deported. Almost an equal number managed to escape; many made their way to Quebec. But the main thrust of Hodson's story is the further adventures of the Acadians, which make the tale told by Longfellow's Evangeline seem pale. They were not welcome in the 13 Colonies, where they were pariahs. France, reeling from its defeat in the Seven Years War, saw them as possible assets, for they made good settlers, and used them as colonists in regions as far afield as the Falkland Islands. Acadian labor seemed a better choice than African slaves. They were also used to colonize sparsely populated regions within France. About half of them managed to reach the major Acadian settlements in Louisiana and Canada, where the deportation order was revoked in 1764. As for the rest, many died from shipwreck, disease, and malnutrition, but many, too, found homes elsewhere. Hodson's thorough research takes him through a vast archive of documents. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. J. A. S. Evans emeritus, University of British Columbia
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Hodson' thorough research takes him through a vast archive of documents...Recommended." --CHOICE "The Acadian Diaspora is a fine debut performance by a young historian of rare sensitivity and talent. Christopher Hodson has taken a long-familiar episode--the expulsion of French settlers from eastern Canada following the Seven Years War--and transformed it into a story of very deep historical significance. As he follows those expelled to their many far-flung destinations, he manages to connect their diaspora with imperialism, slavery, nascent capitalism, and other forces that were just then reshaping the early modern world. His research is impeccable, his interpretive approach altogether sound. And, perhaps most important of all, his writing is so lively and graceful that a reader is carried to a place of great emotional as well as intellectual resonance. In sum: a triumph of artful reconstruction!" --John Demos, author of The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story From Early America "A wondrous journey, luminously told, The Acadian Diaspora invites readers into the social and cultural richness of the French Atlantic. Through stories of exiles, migrants, and seekers, Hodson reconfigures our understanding of empire and analyzes the conjoined creation of American and European eighteenth-century worlds." --Laurent Dubois, author of Haiti: The Aftershocks of History "Hodson is a superb ironist. The Acadian story will never look the same again. But then neither will that of the French Empire: its brutally consequential entanglements with Enlightenment thought wrecked peasant lives long after the initial deportations by the British." --Catherine Desbarats, McGill University "Christopher Hodson movingly tells the stories of the Acadian exiles who scattered all over the Atlantic world after British forces expelled them from their homes in 1755. But his book also reveals tells a much broader tale about eighteenth-century utopian schemes. With wit and humanity, he traces how Acadians became the objects-and often the victims-of countless ill-conceived efforts by imperial officials whose grandiose plans depended on the labor the exiles were expected to provide." --Daniel K. Richter, author of Before the Revolution: America's Ancient Pasts "I would recommend this well written and researched book. It gives a fine narrative account of an important aspect of North American history and describes the plight of a significant Catholic population."--Catholic Books Review
"The Acadian Diasporais a fine debut performance by a young historian of rare sensitivity and talent. Christopher Hodson has taken a long-familiar episode--the expulsion of French settlers from eastern Canada following the Seven Years War--and transformed it into a story of very deep historical significance. As he follows those expelled to their many far-flung destinations, he manages to connect their diaspora with imperialism, slavery, nascent capitalism, and other forces that were just then reshaping the early modern world. His research is impeccable, his interpretive approach altogether sound. And, perhaps most important of all, his writing is so lively and graceful that a reader is carried to a place of great emotional as well as intellectual resonance. In sum: a triumph of artful reconstruction!" --John Demos, author ofThe Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story FromEarly America "A wondrous journey, luminously told,The Acadian Diasporainvites readers into the social and cultural richness of the French Atlantic. Through stories of exiles, migrants, and seekers, Hodson reconfigures our understanding of empire and analyzes the conjoined creation of American and European eighteenth-century worlds." --Laurent Dubois, author ofHaiti: The Aftershocks of History "Hodson is a superb ironist. The Acadian story will never look the same again. But then neither will that of the French Empire: its brutally consequential entanglements with Enlightenment thought wrecked peasant lives long after the initial deportations by the British." --Catherine Desbarats, McGill University "Christopher Hodson movingly tells the stories of the Acadian exiles who scattered all over the Atlantic world after British forces expelled them from their homes in 1755. But his book also reveals tells a much broader tale about eighteenth-century utopian schemes. With wit and humanity, he traces how Acadians became the objects-and often the victims-of countless ill-conceived efforts by imperial officials whose grandiose plans depended on the labor the exiles were expected to provide." --Daniel K. Richter, author ofBefore the Revolution: America's Ancient Pasts
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2013
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text tells the extraordinary story of thousands of Acadians expelled from Nova Scotia and scattered throughout the Atlantic world beginning in 1755. Following them to the Caribbean, the South Atlantic, and western Europe, Hodson illuminates a long-forgotten world of imperial experimentation and human brutality.
Main Description
Late in 1755, an army of British regulars and Massachusetts volunteers completed one of the cruelest, most successful military campaigns in North American history, capturing and deporting seven thousand French-speaking Catholic Acadians from the province of Nova Scotia, and chasing an equal number into the wilderness of eastern Canada. Thousands of Acadians endured three decades of forced migrations and failed settlements that shuttled them to the coasts of South America, the plantations of the Caribbean, the frigid islands of the South Atlantic, the swamps of Louisiana, and the countryside of central France. The Acadian Diasporatells their extraordinary story in full for the first time, illuminating a long-forgotten world of imperial desperation, experimental colonies, and naked brutality. Using documents culled from archives in France, Great Britain, Canada, and the United States, Christopher Hodson reconstructs the lives of Acadian exiles as they traversed oceans and continents, pushed along by empires eager to populate new frontiers with inexpensive, pliable white farmers. Hodson's compelling narrative situates the Acadian diaspora within the dramatic geopolitical changes triggered by the Seven Years' War. Faced with redrawn boundaries and staggering national debts, imperial architects across Europe used the Acadians to realize radical plans: tropical settlements without slaves, expeditions to the unknown southern continent, and, perhaps strangest of all, agricultural colonies within old regime France itself. In response, Acadians embraced their status as human commodities, using intimidation and even violence to tailor their communities to the superheated Atlantic market for cheap, mobile labor. Through vivid, intimate stories of Acadian exiles and the diverse, transnational cast of characters that surrounded them,The Acadian Diasporapresents the eighteenth-century Atlantic world from a new angle, challenging old assumptions about uprooted peoples and the very nature of early modern empire.
Main Description
Late in 1755, an army of British regulars and Massachusetts volunteers completed one of the cruelest, most successful military campaigns in North American history, capturing and deporting seven thousand French-speaking Catholic Acadians from the province of Nova Scotia, and chasing an equal number into the wilderness of eastern Canada. Thousands of Acadians endured three decades of forced migrations and failed settlements that shuttled them to the coasts of South America, the plantationsof the Caribbean, the frigid islands of the South Atlantic, the swamps of Louisiana, and the countryside of central France. The Acadian Diaspora tells their extraordinary story in full for the first time, illuminating a long-forgotten world of imperial desperation, experimental colonies, and naked brutality. Using documents culled from archives in France, Great Britain, Canada, and the United States, Christopher Hodson reconstructs the lives of Acadian exiles as they traversed oceans and continents, pushed along by empires eager to populate new frontiers with inexpensive, pliable white farmers. Hodson's compelling narrative situates the Acadian diaspora within the dramatic geopolitical changes triggered by the Seven Years' War. Faced with redrawn boundaries and staggering national debts, imperial architects across Europe used the Acadians to realize radical plans: tropical settlements without slaves, expeditions to the unknown southern continent, and, perhaps strangest of all, agricultural colonies within old regime France itself. In response, Acadians embraced their status as human commodities, using intimidation and even violence to tailor their communities to the superheated Atlantic market for cheap, mobile labor. Through vivid, intimate stories of Acadian exiles and the diverse, transnational cast of characters that surrounded them, The Acadian Diaspora presents the eighteenth-century Atlantic world from a new angle, challenging old assumptions about uprootedpeoples and the very nature of early modern empire.
Main Description
Late in 1755, an army of British regulars and Massachusetts volunteers completed one of the cruelest, most successful military campaigns in North American history, capturing and deporting seven thousand French-speaking Catholic Acadians from the province of Nova Scotia, and chasing an equalnumber into the wilderness of eastern Canada. Thousands of Acadians endured three decades of forced migrations and failed settlements that shuttled them to the coasts of South America, the plantations of the Caribbean, the frigid islands of the South Atlantic, the swamps of Louisiana, and thecountryside of central France. The Acadian Diaspora tells their extraordinary story in full for the first time, illuminating a long-forgotten world of imperial desperation, experimental colonies, and naked brutality. Using documents culled from archives in France, Great Britain, Canada, and the United States, Christopher Hodsonreconstructs the lives of Acadian exiles as they traversed oceans and continents, pushed along by empires eager to populate new frontiers with inexpensive, pliable white farmers. Hodson's compelling narrative situates the Acadian diaspora within the dramatic geopolitical changes triggered by theSeven Years' War. Faced with redrawn boundaries and staggering national debts, imperial architects across Europe used the Acadians to realize radical plans: tropical settlements without slaves, expeditions to the unknown southern continent, and, perhaps strangest of all, agricultural colonies withinold regime France itself. In response, Acadians embraced their status as human commodities, using intimidation and even violence to tailor their communities to the superheated Atlantic market for cheap, mobile labor. Through vivid, intimate stories of Acadian exiles and the diverse, transnational cast of characters that surrounded them, The Acadian Diaspora presents the eighteenth-century Atlantic world from a new angle, challenging old assumptions about uprooted peoples and the very nature of early modernempire.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: The Worlds of the Acadian Diasporap. 3
The Expulsionp. 15
The Pariahsp. 47
The Tropicsp. 79
The Unknownp. 117
The Homelandp. 146
The Conspiracyp. 173
Conclusion: The Ends of the Acadian Diasporap. 197
Abbreviationsp. 213
Notesp. 215
Indexp. 249
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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