Catalogue


The city-state in Europe, 1000-1600 : hinterland, territory, region /
Tom Scott.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
description
xi, 382 p., [4] p. of col. maps : maps (some col.) ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199274606 (hbk.), 9780199274604 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
isbn
0199274606 (hbk.)
9780199274604 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8290292
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-11-01:
Scott (Univ. of St. Andrews, Scotland) studies the development of city-states in north and north-central Italy, in Swiss and south German cities, and in the Low Countries to determine whether the growth of strong city-states in this south-to-north line was the result of common factors. He concludes that each group of cities followed a distinct path that led to its local success and wide economic influence. In Italy, city-states organized around diocesan centers that became virtually independent following the collapse of the Carolingian empire. In the Swiss area, south Germany, and the Low Countries, strong, dynamic cities emerged at a later time after the strong role of the bishops had already been overthrown. Growth in the Swiss and south German areas depended on the development of urban industries encouraging trade. As Hapsburg rule declined, Swiss cities became independent states. South German cities remained under control of the German emperors. The rise of commercial cities in the Low Countries is even more difficult to unravel, but independent city-states did develop and continued as essentially independent economic organizations well into the 16th century. Numerous maps. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. K. F. Drew emeritus, Rice University
Reviews
Review Quotes
Historians are thus likely to come away from their inquiry with the feeling that they have touched the pulse of history
Scott has given us an excellent, very stimulating starting point, which any future effort to examine economic and political transformation from the Middle Ages to modernity will surely want to take account of.
"Scott studies the development of city-states in north and north-central Italy, in Swiss and south German cities, and in the Low Countries to determine whether the growth of strong city-states in this south to north line was the result of common facotrs. Recommended." --CHOICE
"This book is the culmination of a long, distinguished career that has always combined deep archival research with broad readings...It will be an indispensable guide to all historians seeking to understand the city-state as a European political phenomenon." --Renaissance Quarterly "Scott studies the development of city-states in north and north-central Italy, in Swiss and south German cities, and in the Low Countries to determine whether the growth of strong city-states in this south to north line was the result of common facotrs. Recommended." --CHOICE
Tom Scott's The City-State in Europe, 1000-1600 brings a major addition to our picture of the subject. He provides a detailed cross-section of developments in Italy, Germany, Switzerland and the Low Countries.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this study of city-states in medieval Europe, Tom Scott analyses reasons for cities' aquisitions of territory and how they were governed. He argues that city-states did not wither after 1500, but survived by transformation and adaption.
Long Description
No detailed comparison of the city-state in medieval Europe has been undertaken over the last century. Research has concentrated on the role of city-states and their republican polities as harbingers of the modern state, or else on their artistic and cultural achievements, above all in Italy. Much less attention has been devoted to the cities' territorial expansion: why, how, and with what consequences cities in the urban belt, stretching from central and northern Italy over theAlps to Switzerland, Germany, and the low countries, succeeded (or failed) in constructing sovereign polities, with or without dependent territories. Tom Scott goes beyond the customary focus on the leading Italian city-states to include, for the first time, detailed coverage of the Swiss city-states and the imperial cities of Germany. He criticizes current typologies of the city-state in Europe advanced by political and social scientists to suggest that the city-state was not a spent force in early modern Europe, but rather survived by transformation and adaption. He puts forward instead a typology which embraces both time and space byarguing for a regional framework for analysis which does not treat city-states in isolation but within a wider geopolitical setting.
Main Description
No detailed comparison of the city-state in medieval Europe has been undertaken over the last century. Research has concentrated on the role of city-states and their republican polities as harbingers of the modern state, or else on their artistic and cultural achievements, above all in Italy. Much less attention has been devoted to the cities' territorial expansion: why, how, and with what consequences cities in the urban belt, stretching from central and northern Italy over the Alps to Switzerland, Germany, and the low countries, succeeded (or failed) in constructing sovereign polities, with or without dependent territories. Tom Scott goes beyond the customary focus on the leading Italian city-states to include, for the first time, detailed coverage of the Swiss city-states and the imperial cities of Germany. He criticizes current typologies of the city-state in Europe advanced by political and social scientists to suggest that the city-state was not a spent force in early modern Europe, but rather survived by transformation and adaption. He puts forward instead a typology which embraces both time and space by arguing for a regional framework for analysis which does not treat city-states in isolation but within a wider geopolitical setting.
Main Description
No detailed comparison of the city-state in medieval Europe has been undertaken over the last century. Research has concentrated on the role of city-states and their republican polities as harbingers of the modern state, or else on their artistic and cultural achievements, above all in Italy.Much less attention has been devoted to the cities' territorial expansion: why, how, and with what consequences cities in the urban belt, stretching from central and northern Italy over the Alps to Switzerland, Germany, and the low countries, succeeded (or failed) in constructing sovereign polities,with or without dependent territories. Tom Scott goes beyond the customary focus on the leading Italian city-states to include, for the first time, detailed coverage of the Swiss city-states and the imperial cities of Germany. He criticizes current typologies of the city-state in Europe advanced by political and social scientists tosuggest that the city-state was not a spent force in early modern Europe, but rather survived by transformation and adaption. He puts forward instead a typology which embraces both time and space by arguing for a regional framework for analysis which does not treat city-states in isolation butwithin a wider geopolitical setting.
Table of Contents
List of Mapsp. ix
Note on Usagep. x
Introductionp. 1
Europe in AD 1000p. 5
Urban revivalp. 5
The communal traditionp. 9
The Mediterranean citiesp. 12
The age of church reformp. 15
The rise of the communes, 1000-1150p. 17
The early Italian communesp. 17
Diocese and countyp. 22
Territorial expansionp. 24
Cities and rural lordsp. 28
Communal instabilityp. 31
Cities and their adversaries, 1150-1300p. 33
Empire and papacyp. 33
The Lombard leaguesp. 36
Podesta and popolop. 39
The foundation of new townsp. 44
The emancipation of serfsp. 47
The rise of the signoriap. 51
Cities and leagues in northern Europep. 56
City-states at the crossroads, 1300-1450: the southp. 64
Consolidation and realignment in Italyp. 64
Lombardy and Liguriap. 66
Venice: 'Stato di Mar' and terrafermap. 78
Emilia-Romagna and central Italyp. 92
Tuscanyp. 103
City-states at the crossroads, 1300-1450: the northp. 129
The patterns of dominationp. 129
The southern Low Countriesp. 131
The Hanseatic and north German citiesp. 137
Cities and towns in southern Germanyp. 148
The Swiss Confederationp. 164
Survival and transformation, 1450-1600p. 193
The patterns of changep. 193
Survival by attractionp. 194
Survival by accommodationp. 199
Survival by adaptionp. 206
Survival by defaultp. 212
Conclusionp. 214
North and south comparedp. 214
Typologies of the city-statep. 223
Cities and their regionsp. 234
Notesp. 242
Bibliographyp. 319
Indexp. 361
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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