Catalogue

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Time and the moment in Victorian literature and society /
Sue Zemka.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
description
vii, 285 p.
ISBN
1107007429 (hardback), 9781107007420 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
isbn
1107007429 (hardback)
9781107007420 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: 1. A brief history of the moment; 2. The economic mediation of time; 3. Pie'd: the moment in mid-Victorian working-class fiction; 4. Dickens's peripatetic novels; 5. Adam Bede and the redemption of time; 6. Daniel Deronda: Eliot's anti-epiphanic novel; 7. Panic in Lord Jim; Conclusion: lost duration.
abstract
"Sudden changes, opportunities or revelations have always carried a special significance in western culture, from the Greek and later the Christian kairos to Evangelical experiences of conversion. This fascinating book explores the ways in which England, under the influence of industrialising forces and increased precision in assessing the passing of time, attached importance to moments and events that compress great significance into small units of time. Sue Zemka questions the importance that modernity invests in momentary events, from religion to aesthetics and philosophy. She argues for a strain in Victorian and early modern novels critical of the values the age invested in moments of time, and suggests that such novels also offer a correction to contemporary culture and criticism, with its emphasis on the momentary event as an agency of change"--
catalogue key
8289958
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 263-278) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume examines the ways in which 19th-century England, under the influence of industrialisation and increased precision in assessing the passing of time, began to attach new importance to moments, and how writers introduced into major works of fiction incidents and events of great significance compressed into small units of time.
Description for Bookstore
Examines the ways in which nineteenth-century England, under the influence of industrialising forces and increased precision in assessing the passing of time, began to attach new importance to moments, and how writers introduced into major works of fiction incidents and events of great significance compressed into small units of time.
Description for Bookstore
Examines the ways in which nineteenth-century England, under the influence of industrializing forces and increased precision in assessing the passing of time, began to attach new importance to moments, and how writers introduced into major works of fiction incidents and events of great significance compressed into small units of time.
Main Description
Sudden changes, opportunities or revelations have always carried a special significance in western culture, from the Greek and later the Christian kairos to Evangelical experiences of conversion. This fascinating book explores the ways in which England, under the influence of industrialising forces and increased precision in assessing the passing of time, attached importance to moments and events that compress great significance into small units of time. Sue Zemka questions the importance that modernity invests in momentary events, from religion to aesthetics and philosophy. She argues for a strain in Victorian and early modern novels critical of the values the age invested in moments of time, and suggests that such novels also offer a correction to contemporary culture and criticism, with its emphasis on the momentary event as an agency of change.
Main Description
Sudden changes, opportunities, or revelations have always carried a special significance in Western culture, from the Greek and later the Christian kairos to Evangelical experiences of conversion. This fascinating book explores the ways in which England, under the influence of industrializing forces and increased precision in assessing the passing of time, attached importance to moments, events that compress great significance into small units of time. Sue Zemka questions the importance that modernity invests in momentary events, from religion to aesthetics and philosophy. She argues for a strain in Victorian and early modern novels critical of the values the age invested in moments of time, and suggests that such novels also offer a correction to contemporary culture and criticism, with its emphasis on the momentary event as an agency of change.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vi
Introductionp. 1
A brief history of the momentp. 15
The economic mediation of timep. 70
Pie'dp. 92
Dickens's peripatetic novelsp. 102
Adam Bede and the redemption of timep. 122
Daniel Deronda: Eliot's anti-epiphanic novelp. 147
Panic in Lord Jimp. 174
Conclusion: Lost durationp. 200
Notesp. 228
Referencesp. 263
Indexp. 279
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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