Catalogue

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State healthcare and Yanomami transformations : a symmetrical ethnography /
José Antonio Kelly.
imprint
Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2011.
description
xvii, 255 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0816529205 (hard cover : alk. paper), 9780816529209 (hard cover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2011.
isbn
0816529205 (hard cover : alk. paper)
9780816529209 (hard cover : alk. paper)
contents note
The upper Orinoco Yanomami and their context -- Particularizing the Upper Orinoco health system -- Epidemic diseases, Criollos, and the morality of being human -- Becoming Napë and the Napë transformational axis -- Making kin, making society, and Napë potential affinity -- Being and performing Napë and Yanomami -- Doctors and shamans -- Two meetings and a protest -- Changing tides and mixed feelings.
catalogue key
8289943
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 239-248) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
A symmetrical anthropology that places the study of culture and cosmology squarely within the context of the modern nation-state and its institutions. Kelly explores Indian-white relations as seen through the operation of a state-run health system among the indigenous Yanomami of southern Venezuela.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This introspective and comprehensive study in contemporary Venezuela is a prime example of a new turn taking place in twenty-first-century field anthropology. The most audacious, perspicacious, and practicable of the recent books in its genre." --Roy Wagner, author of Coyote Anthropology
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title challenges the long-standing dichotomy that anthropological writing on Amazonian peoples has been divided between 'traditional' topics like kinship, cosmology, ritual, and myth, on the one hand, and the analysis of their struggles with the nation-state on the other.
Main Description
Amazonian indigenous peoples have preserved many aspects of their culture and cosmology while also developing complex relationships with dominant non-indigenous society. Until now, anthropological writing on Amazonian peoples has been divided between "traditional" topics like kinship, cosmology, ritual, and myth, on the one hand, and the analysis of their struggles with the nation-state on the other. What has been lacking is work that bridges these two approaches and takes into consideration the meaning of relationships with the state from an indigenous perspective. That long-standing dichotomy is challenged in this new ethnography by anthropologist Jos Kelly. Kelly places the study of culture and cosmology squarely within the context of the modern nation-state and its institutions. He explores Indian-white relations as seen through the operation of a state-run health system among the indigenous Yanomami of southern Venezuela. With theoretical foundations in the fields of medical and Amazonian anthropology, Kelly sheds light on how Amerindian cosmology shapes concepts of the state at the community level. The result is a symmetrical anthropology that treats white and Amerindian perceptions of each other within a single theoretical framework, thus expanding our understanding of each group and its influences on the other. This book will be valuable to those studying Amazonian peoples, medical anthropology, development studies, and Latin America. Its new takes on theory and methodology make it ideal for classroom use.
Main Description
Amazonian indigenous peoples have preserved many aspects of their culture and cosmology while also developing complex relationships with dominant non-indigenous society. Until now, anthropological writing on Amazonian peoples has been divided between "traditional" topics like kinship, cosmology, ritual, and myth, on the one hand, and the analysis of their struggles with the nation-state on the other. What has been lacking is work that bridges these two approaches and takes into consideration the meaning of relationships with the state from an indigenous perspective. That long-standing dichotomy is challenged in this new ethnography by anthropologist José Kelly. Kelly places the study of culture and cosmology squarely within the context of the modern nation-state and its institutions. He explores Indian-white relations as seen through the operation of a state-run health system among the indigenous Yanomami of southern Venezuela. With theoretical foundations in the fields of medical and Amazonian anthropology, Kelly sheds light on how Amerindian cosmology shapes concepts of the state at the community level. The result is a symmetrical anthropology that treats white and Amerindian perceptions of each other within a single theoretical framework, thus expanding our understanding of each group and its influences on the other. This book will be valuable to those studying Amazonian peoples, medical anthropology, development studies, and Latin America. Its new takes on theory and methodology make it ideal for classroom use.
Main Description
Amazonian indigenous peoples have preserved many aspects of their culture and cosmology while also developing complex relationships with dominant non-indigenous society. Until now, anthropological writing on Amazonian peoples has been divided between “traditional" topics like kinship, cosmology, ritual, and myth, on the one hand, and the analysis of their struggles with the nation-state on the other. What has been lacking is work that bridges these two approaches and takes into consideration the meaning of relationships with the state from an indigenous perspective. That long-standing dichotomy is challenged in this new ethnography by anthropologist Jos Kelly. Kelly places the study of culture and cosmology squarely within the context of the modern nation-state and its institutions. He explores Indian-white relations as seen through the operation of a state-run health system among the indigenous Yanomami of southern Venezuela. With theoretical foundations in the fields of medical and Amazonian anthropology, Kelly sheds light on how Amerindian cosmology shapes concepts of the state at the community level. The result is a symmetrical anthropology that treats white and Amerindian perceptions of each other within a single theoretical framework, thus expanding our understanding of each group and its influences on the other. This book will be valuable to those studying Amazonian peoples, medical anthropology, development studies, and Latin America. Its new takes on theory and methodology make it ideal for classroom use.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. ix
List of Tablesp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
List of Abbreviationsp. xvii
Introductionp. 1
The Upper Orinoco Yanomami and Their Contextp. 14
Particularizing the Upper Orinoco Health Systemp. 34
Epidemic Diseases, Criollos, and the Morality of Being Humanp. 52
Becoming Napë and the Napë Transformational Axisp. 74
Making Kin, Making Society, and Napë Potential Affinityp. 93
Being and Performing Napë and Yanomamip. 111
Doctors and Shamansp. 140
Two Meetings and a Protestp. 164
Changing Tides and Mixed Feelingsp. 200
Conclusionp. 217
Notesp. 233
Bibliographyp. 239
Indexp. 249
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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