Catalogue


Small, gritty, and green : the promise of America's smaller industrial cities in a low-carbon world /
Catherine Tumber.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2012.
description
xxxiv, 211 p.
ISBN
0262016699 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780262016698 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2012.
isbn
0262016699 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780262016698 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : beloved communties, benighted times -- Against "shapeless giantism." -- Mega dreams and small city realities : trafficking in transportation planning -- Agriculture on the urban fringe and beyond -- Framing urban farming -- Making good : renewables and the revival of smaller industrial cities -- Roots of knowledge : local economics, urban scale, and schooling for civic renewal.
catalogue key
8289871
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [175]-193) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-10-01:
In recent years many small to mid-sized industrial cities of the Midwest have struggled economically. The near collapse of America's automotive companies has left these areas with widespread unemployment and other enormous challenges. Tumber (research affiliate, MIT's Community Innovators Lab) studied 25 small to mid-sized industrial cities in the Northeast and Midwest regions and here makes recommendations for what these cities can do to thrive and grow instead of wasting away. Small cities are inherently different from large ones, she maintains, and city planners need to move beyond "planning for growth" models, especially when many of the cities in these areas are dwindling in numbers. Instead, they should harness the unique blend of flexibility and resources available in small cities to solve problems creatively. VERDICT Recommended for anyone interested in city planning or studying the socioeconomic challenges of the Midwest and Northeast regions.-William Baer, Georgia Inst. of Technology Lib., Atlanta (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is a clear and intelligent call for Americans to find the great value waiting in the many small cities across this land. At a time in history when everything has to get smaller, finer, and more local, these places occupy increasingly important geographic sites and need to be brought back to life. Catherine Tumber understands the dynamic completely and lays it out eloquently." -- James Howard Kunstler , author of the novels The Long Emergency and World Made by Hand
"[Tumber's] excellent new book_finds potential in many busted and booming-again cities." -- Scott Carlson , Urbanite
"[Tumber's] excellent new book...finds potential in many busted and booming-again cities." -- Scott Carlson , Urbanite
"As the former mayor of a mid-sized, declining Northeastern city, I have long argued that the only attention which comes our way is when something negative happens: a major employer leaving town, a failed economic development venture, or a significant outbreak of violent crime. We were rarely seen as centers of innovation and ingenuity, or as having the assets to revitalize ourselves. Now Catherine Tumber has laid out a coherent path for recovery and revitalization of these small-to-medium-sized industrial cities. Hers is based not on academic theory but on observation of what is in place and what possibilities actually exist. Her prescriptions do not rely on pity but on how to play a winning hand." -- William A. Johnson, Jr. , Distinguished Professor of Public Policy and Urban Studies, Rochester Institute of Technology, Mayor of Rochester, 1994-2005
" Small, Gritty, and Green shows how small and mid-sized rust-belt cities can serve as models for sustainable urban living. Tumber's thesis is presented in a fast-moving mix of history, original interviews, and assessment of received urban planning wisdom. Her compelling argument is that planners, politicians, and the general populace would be wise to try something completely different and that these cities, though largely invisible in past scholarship, represent an important pathway to the future." -- Peggy F. Barlett , Goodrich C. White Professor of Anthropology, Emory University, editor of Urban Place: Reconnecting with the Natural World
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, October 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
Americas once-vibrant small-to-midsize cities -- Syracuse, Worcester, Akron, Flint, Rockford, and others -- increasingly resemble urban wastelands. Gutted by deindustrialization, outsourcing, and middle-class flight, disproportionately devastated by metro freeway systems that laid waste to the urban fabric and displaced the working poor, small industrial cities seem to be part of Americas past, not its future. And yet, Catherine Tumber argues in this provocative book, Americas gritty Rust Belt cities could play a central role in a greener, low-carbon, relocalized future.As we wean ourselves from fossil fuels and realize the environmental costs of suburban sprawl, we will see that small cities offer many assets for sustainable living not shared by their big city or small town counterparts, including population density and nearby, fertile farmland available for new environmentally friendly uses.Tumber traveled to twenty-five cities in the Northeast and Midwest -- from Buffalo to Peoria to Detroit to Rochester -- interviewing planners, city officials, and activists, and weaving their stories into this exploration of small-scale urbanism. Smaller cities can be a critical part of a sustainable future and a productive green economy. "Small, Gritty, and Green "will help us develop the moral and political imagination we need to realize this.
Main Description
America's once-vibrant small-to-midsize cities -- Syracuse, Worcester, Akron, Flint,Rockford, and others -- increasingly resemble urban wastelands. Gutted by deindustrialization,outsourcing, and middle-class flight, disproportionately devastated by metro freeway systems thatlaid waste to the urban fabric and displaced the working poor, small industrial cities seem to bepart of America's past, not its future. And yet, Catherine Tumber argues in this provocative book,America's gritty Rust Belt cities could play a central role in a greener, low-carbon, relocalizedfuture. As we wean ourselves from fossil fuels and realize the environmental costsof suburban sprawl, we will see that small cities offer many assets for sustainable living notshared by their big city or small town counterparts, including population density and nearby,fertile farmland available for new environmentally friendly uses. Tumber traveledto twenty-five cities in the Northeast and Midwest -- from Buffalo to Peoria to Detroit to Rochester-- interviewing planners, city officials, and activists, and weaving their stories into thisexploration of small-scale urbanism. Smaller cities can be a critical part of a sustainable futureand a productive green economy. Small, Gritty, and Green will help us develop themoral and political imagination we need to realize this.
Main Description
America's once-vibrant small-to-midsize cities--Syracuse, Worcester, Akron, Flint, Rockford, and others--increasingly resemble urban wastelands. Gutted by deindustrialization, outsourcing, and middle-class flight, disproportionately devastated by metro freeway systems that laid waste to the urban fabric and displaced the working poor, and struggling with pockets of poverty reminiscent of postcolonial squalor, small industrial cities--as a class--have become invisible to a public distracted by the Wall Street (big city) versus Main Street (small town) matchup. These cities would seem to be part of America's past, not its future. And yet, journalist and historian Catherine Tumber argues in this provocative book, America's gritty Rust Belt cities could play a central role in a greener, low-carbon, relocalized future. As we wean ourselves from fossil fuels and realize the environmental costs of suburban sprawl, we will see that small cities offer many assets for sustainable living not shared by their big city or small town counterparts: population density (and the capacity for more); fertile, nearby farmland available for local agriculture, windmills, and solar farms; and manufacturing infrastructure and workforce skill that can be repurposed for the production of renewable technology. Tumber, who has spent much of her life in Rust Belt cities, traveled to twenty-five cities in the Northeast and Midwest--from Buffalo to Peoria to Detroit to Rochester--interviewing planners, city officials, and activists, and weaving their stories into this exploration of small-scale urbanism. Smaller cities can be a critical part of a sustainable future and a productive green economy. Small, Gritty, and Green will help us develop the moral and political imagination we need to realize this.
Bowker Data Service Summary
America's gritty Rust Belt cities could - journalist and historian Catherine Tumber argues - play a central role in a greener, low-carbon, relocalised future. Interviewing planners, city officials and activists, she weaves their stories into an exploration of small-scale urbanism.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: Beloved Communities, Benighted Timesp. xv
Against "Shapeless Giantism"p. 1
Megadreams and Small City Realities: Trafficking in Transportation Planningp. 23
"It Takes the Whole Region to Make the City": Agriculture on the Urban Fringe and Beyondp. 37
Framing Urban Farmingp. 65
Making Good: Renewables and the Revival of Smaller Industrial Citiesp. 89
Roots of Knowledge: Local Economics, Urban Scale, and Schooling for Civic Renewalp. 119
Notesp. 141
Selected Bibliographyp. 175
Indexp. 195
Series Listp. 213
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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