Catalogue


Indians and British outposts in eighteenth-century America /
Daniel Ingram.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2012.
description
xiii, 257 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813037972 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9780813037974 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2012.
isbn
0813037972 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9780813037974 (hbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: British forts and Indian neighbors -- The Key to Carolina: Old Hop, Little Carpenter, and the making of Fort Loudoun, 1756-1759 -- Anxious hospitality: loitering at Fort Allen, 1756-1761 -- The greatest mart of all: trade, food, drink, and interdependence at Michilimackinac, 1761- 1796 -- A year at Niagara: violence, diplomacy, and coexistence in the eastern Great Lakes, 1763- 1764 -- Like stars that fall: keeping up appearances at Fort Chartres, 1765-1772 -- Conclusion: the Mohawks' new world.
catalogue key
8289831
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [235]-248) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Daniel Ingram is assistant professor of history at Ball State University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-08-01:
This study does not focus on forts as defensive or offensive intrusions into Indian territory, but refreshingly looks at how Indian nations culturally influenced and managed their social-economic interactions with the military and traders at five forts in Colonial America. In his introduction, Ingram (Ball State Univ.) presents the complexity of fort culture, which was more a result of Indian values and cultural norms than a shadow of the British Empire. He then studies five forts as examples of Indian-British interaction on the American frontier: the Cherokee of South Carolina and Fort Loudon (1756-59); Fort Allen (1756-61) in eastern Pennsylvania and visiting Iroquois and Delaware delegations; Fort Michilimackinac (1761-96), Michigan; Fort Niagara (1763-64) and its role in the Pontiac uprising; and Fort Chartres (1765-72) in Illinois, where the British failed to assert political control of the local Indian nations. In his conclusion, the author presents the Mohawk case of how Indian nations integrated forts into their cultural milieu. This impressive book is supported by 45 pages of notes and bibliography. A must for those interested in the importance of forts to Indian-British relations. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J. B. Richardson III emeritus, University of Pittsburgh
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2012
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
"A refreshing view of the British-Indian frontier in which Indians figure as prominently within the walls of the fort as beyond them."-Colin G. Calloway, Dartmouth College "By showing the influence of Indians on places that were often designed to impose military and diplomatic power, Ingram complicates the early American experience. If they shaped British policy there, perhaps they shaped it everywhere."-Andrew K. Frank, Florida State University This fascinating look at the cultural and military importance of British forts in the colonial era explains how these forts served as communities in Indian country more than as bastions of British imperial power. Their security depended on maintaining good relations with the local Native Americans, who incorporated the forts into their economic and social life as well as into their strategies. Daniel Ingram uses official British records, traveler accounts, archaeological findings, and ethnographic information to reveal native contributions to the forts' stories. Conducting in-depth research at five different forts, he looked for features that seemed to arise from Native American culture rather than British imperial culture. His fresh perspective reveals that British fort culture was heavily influenced, and in some cases guided, by the very people these outposts of empire were meant to impress and subdue. In this volume, Ingram recaptures the significance of small-scale encounters as vital features of the colonial American story, without arguing their importance in larger imperial frameworks. He specifically seeks to reorient the meaning of British military and provincial backcountry forts away from their customary roles as harbingers of European imperial domination. Daniel Ingramis assistant professor of history at Ball State University.
Description for Bookstore
“A refreshing view of the British-Indian frontier in which Indians figure as prominently within the walls of the fort as beyond them.”-Colin G. Calloway, Dartmouth College “By showing the influence of Indians on places that were often designed to impose military and diplomatic power, Ingram complicates the early American experience. If they shaped British policy there, perhaps they shaped it everywhere.”-Andrew K. Frank, Florida State University This fascinating look at the cultural and military importance of British forts in the colonial era explains how these forts served as communities in Indian country more than as bastions of British imperial power. Their security depended on maintaining good relations with the local Native Americans, who incorporated the forts into their economic and social life as well as into their strategies. Daniel Ingram uses official British records, traveler accounts, archaeological findings, and ethnographic information to reveal native contributions to the forts’ stories. Conducting in-depth research at five different forts, he looked for features that seemed to arise from Native American culture rather than British imperial culture. His fresh perspective reveals that British fort culture was heavily influenced, and in some cases guided, by the very people these outposts of empire were meant to impress and subdue. In this volume, Ingram recaptures the significance of small-scale encounters as vital features of the colonial American story, without arguing their importance in larger imperial frameworks. He specifically seeks to reorient the meaning of British military and provincial backcountry forts away from their customary roles as harbingers of European imperial domination. Daniel Ingramis assistant professor of history at Ball State University.
Main Description
This fascinating look at the cultural and military importance of British forts in the colonial era explains how these forts served as communities in Indian country more than as bastions of British imperial power. The colonizers' security depended on maintaining good relations with the local Native Americans, who incorporated the forts into their economic and social life as well as into their strategies.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: British Forts and Indian Neighborsp. l
The Key to Carolina: Old Hop, Little Carpenter, and the Making of Fort Loudoun, 1756-1759p. 27
Anxious Hospitality: Loitering at Fort Allen, 1756-1761p. 59
The Greatest Mart of All Trade: Food, Drink, and Interdependence at Michilimackinac, 1761-1796p. 88
A Year at Niagara: Violence, Diplomacy, and Coexistence in the Eastern Great Lakes, 1763-1764p. 121
Like Stars That Fall: Keeping Up Appearances at Fort Chartres, 1765-1772p. 156
Conclusion: The Mohawks' New Worldp. 193
Notesp. 203
Bibliographyp. 235
Indexp. 249
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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