Catalogue


Commercial republicanism in the Dutch Golden Age : the political thought of Johan & Pieter de la Court /
by Arthur Weststeijn.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2012.
description
xiv, 395 p. : ill. (some col.)
ISBN
9004221395, 9789004221390
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2012.
isbn
9004221395
9789004221390
catalogue key
8276643
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Arthur Weststeijn, Ph.D. (2010) in History, European University Institute in Florence, is Director of Historical Studies at the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome. His research focuses on the intellectual history of the early-modern Dutch Republic from an international perspective. This is his first book.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, April 2012
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Summaries
Long Description
The Dutch seventeenth century, a 'Golden Age' ridden by intense ideological conflict, pioneered global trade, participatory politics and religious toleration. Its history is epitomized by the life and works of the brothers Johan (1622-1660) and Pieter de la Court (1618-1685), two successful textile entrepreneurs and radical republican theorists during the apex of Dutch primacy in world trade. This book explores the many facets of the brothers' political thought, focusing on their ground-breaking argument that commerce forms the mainstay of republican politics. With a contextual analysis that highlights the interaction between thinking and acting, between intellectual and cultural history, the book reveals the international significance of this commercial republicanism and it proposes a novel, rhetorical approach to seventeenth-century Dutch political culture.
Description for Reader
All those interested in the history of early modern Europe, Dutch history, intellectual history and the history of political thought.
Long Description
The Dutch seventeenth century, a #145;Golden Age#146; ridden by intense ideological conflict, pioneered global trade, participatory politics and religious toleration. Its history is epitomized by the life and works of the brothers Johan (1622-1660) and Pieter de la Court (1618-1685), two successful textile entrepreneurs and radical republican theorists during the apex of Dutch primacy in world trade. This book explores the many facets of the brothers#146; political thought, focusing on their ground-breaking argument that commerce forms the mainstay of republican politics. With a contextual analysis that highlights the interaction between thinking and acting, between intellectual and cultural history, the book reveals the international significance of this commercial republicanism and it proposes a novel, rhetorical approach to seventeenth-century Dutch political culture.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Johan and Pieter de la Court were two 17th century Dutch republican theorists. This book explores many facets of the brothers' political thought, focusing on their groundbreaking argument that commerce forms the mainstay of republican politics.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
A Note on Referencesp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
The Making of an ┬┐uvrep. 25
A Humanist Educationp. 26
The Dutch Debatep. 37
The Making of an ┬┐uvrep. 50
Conclusion: Politics as a Ballgamep. 63
The Rhetoric of the Marketp. 69
Persuading the Passionsp. 71
In the Public Arena: Rhetoric in Actionp. 87
Fables and Franknessp. 114
Conclusion: The Rhetoric of the Marketp. 133
Wise Merchantsp. 141
Hobbes & the Foundation of the Commonwealthp. 142
Citizenship in Theory and Practicep. 157
The Ethics of Self-interestp. 168
Representing the Wise Merchantp. 184
Conclusion: Commercial Citizenship in Perspectivep. 200
The Commercial Commonwealthp. 205
The Batavian Athensp. 206
The Politics of Free Tradep. 224
Monarchy Dethronedp. 242
Towards a Merchant Democracyp. 261
Conclusion: The Radical Republicp. 279
Concord and Tolerationp. 284
The Erasmian Momentp. 286
The Relation between Church and Statep. 298
Toleration: Pluralism for the Sake of Unityp. 316
Epilogue: From Freedom of Religion to Freedom of Speech?p. 337
Conclusion: The Brothers De la Court and the Commercial Republican Traditionp. 345
Bibliographyp. 359
Indexp. 389
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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