Catalogue


Evaluation of U.S. Air Force preacquisition technology development /
Committee on Evaluation of U.S. Air Force Preacquisition Technology Development, Air Force Studies Board, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences, National Research Council of the National Academies.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, c2011.
description
xviii, 136 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0309162750, 9780309162753
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, c2011.
isbn
0309162750
9780309162753
contents note
Preacquisition technology development for Air Force weapon systems -- The current state of the Air Force's acquisition policies, processes, and workforce -- Government and industry best practices -- The recommended path forward.
abstract
From the days of biplanes and open cockpits, the air forces of the United States have relied on the mastery of technology. From design to operation, a project can stretch to 20 years and more, with continuous increases in cost. Much of the delay and cost growth afflicting modern United States Air Force (USAF) programs is rooted in the incorporation of advanced technology into major systems acquisition. Leaders in the Air Force responsible for science and technology and acquisition are trying to determine the optimal way to utilize existing policies, processes, and resources to properly document and execute pre-program of record technology development efforts, including opportunities to facilitate the rapid acquisition of revolutionary capabilities and the more deliberate acquisition of evolutionary capabilities. This book responds to this need with an examination of the current state of Air Force technology development and the environment in which technology is acquired. The book considers best practices from both government and industry to distill appropriate recommendations that can be implemented within the USAF.--Publisher's description.
catalogue key
8272774
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, December 2012
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
From the days of biplanes and open cockpits, the air forces of the United States have relied on the mastery of technology. From design to operation, a project can stretch to 20 years and more, with continuous increases in cost. Much of the delay and cost growth afflicting modern United States Air Force (USAF) programs is rooted in the incorporation of advanced technology into major systems acquisition. Leaders in the Air Force responsible for science and technology and acquisition are trying to determine the optimal way to utilize existing policies, processes, and resources to properly document and execute pre-program of record technology development efforts, including opportunities to facilitate the rapid acquisition of revolutionary capabilities and the more deliberate acquisition of evolutionary capabilities. Evaluation of U.S. Air Force Preacquisition Technology Development responds to this need with an examination of the current state of Air Force technology development and the environment in which technology is acquired. The book considers best practices from both government and industry to distill appropriate recommendations that can be implemented within the USAF.
Table of Contents
Summaryp. 1
Preacquisition Technology Development for Air Force Weapon Systemsp. 11
Statement of Task and Committee Formationp. 12
The Parameters of This Studyp. 13
Committee Approach to the Studyp. 16
Three Domains of the Air Forcep. 16
Airp. 16
Spacep. 18
Cyberspacep. 21
Air Force Science and Technology Strategic Planningp. 24
The ôThree Rö Frameworkp. 25
Requirementsp. 25
Resourcesp. 27
The Right Peoplep. 29
Report Organizationp. 31
The Current State of the Air Force's Acquisition Policies, Processes, and Workforcep. 33
Current and Historical Policies and Processes Related to Technology Developmentp. 33
Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution Systemp. 34
Department of Defense Instruction 5000.02p. 34
Air Force Acquisition Improvement Planp. 37
Joint Capabilities Integration and Development Systemp. 37
Competitive Prototypingp. 37
Historical Governance Related to Technology Developmentp. 38
The Trust ôDeath Spiral,öp. 38
The ôThree Rö Frameworkp. 44
Requirementsp. 44
Resourcesp. 54
The Right Peoplep. 58
Concluding Thoughtsp. 60
Government and Industry Best Practices Best Practicesp. 62
Examples of Government Best Practicesp. 63
Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organizationp. 63
Capabilities Development for Rapid Transitionp. 65
Big Safarip. 66
Future Naval Capabilities Processp. 67
Army S&T Objective Processp. 70
Dragon Eyep. 73
Examples of Joint Government and Industry Cooperationp. 76
The Rapid Reaction Technology Office and the VADER Systemp. 76
DARPA's Adaptive Execution Officep. 78
Ground Robotics Consortiump. 79
The National Small Arms Centerp. 80
Sierra Nevada Corporation and the Commercial Space Sectorp. 81
The Naval Center for Space Technologyp. 82
Examples of Industry Best Practicesp. 83
High Technological/Manufacturing/Integration Readiness Levels Pay Off: Ford, Jaguar, and Adaptive Cruise Controlp. 83
The Innovation Culture at 3Mp. 84
Technology Networks at Raytheonp. 86
Concluding Thoughtsp. 87
The Recommended Path Forwardp. 89
p. 91
Freezing Requirements Too Early or Too Late in the Technology Development Phase Can Lead to a Mismatch Between Technology-Enabled Capabilities and Requirement Expectations That Significantly Reduces the Probability of Successful Technology Transitionsp. 91
p. 92
The Lack of an Air Force-Level Science and Technology Strategy Leads to AFRL Efforts That May Not Support Desired Strategic Air Force Capabilities, and to the Fragmented Prioritization and Allocation of 6.4 Technology Transition Fundsp. 92
p. 96
Current Air Force Funding and Business Practices for-Pre-Milestone B Activities Are Inconsistent with Department of Defense Instruction 5000.02p. 96
p. 97
Technology Readiness Levels Must Be Accurately Assessed to Prevent Programs from Entering the Engineering and Manufacturing Development Phase with Immature Technologyp. 97
p. 98
Developing Technologies and Weapon Systems in Parallel Almost Inevitably Causes Cost Overruns, Schedule Slippage, and/or the Eventual Reduction in Planned Capabilitiesp. 98
p. 99
Weak Ties and Lack of Collaboration Within and Between Government and Industry Lead to Lack of Awareness of Government Priorities and of Industry's Technology Breakthroughsp. 99
p. 100
A Much Reduced and Inexperienced Development Planning Workforce Has Weakened the Technology Transition Bridge Between Laboratories, Product Centers, and Major Commandsp. 100
Conclusionp. 101
Appendixes
Biographical Sketches of Committee Membersp. 105
Meetings and Participating Organizationsp. 115
Background Information on Policies and Processes Related to Technology Developmentp. 123
Background Information on the Vanguard Process and Applied Technology Councilsp. 132
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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