Catalogue


Ventriloquized voices [electronic resource] : feminist theory and English Renaissance texts /
Elizabeth D. Harvey.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 1992.
description
x, 173 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0415067324
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 1992.
isbn
0415067324
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8269704
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 158-168) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-06:
In this fascinating and original work, well suited for graduate students and researchers/faculty, Harvey (Univ. of Western Ontario) presents a historical and theoretical study of select Renaissance texts--specifically, those written by male authors but "voiced by female characters in a way that seems either to erase the gender of the authorial voice or to thematize the transvestism of this process." In other words, she argues that ventriloquism, as used by the writers in the early modern period, "is a powerful strategy of silencing, of speaking on behalf of another, of disrupting the boundaries of a propertied utterance." More specifically, Harvey examines such diverse works as John Donne's Anniversaries, Edmund Spenser's Faerie Queen, midwifery books, pamphlets on transvestism, and treatises on gynocology and hysteria. Harvey applies several theoretical strands (e.g., new historicism, formalism, and feminism) to offer sensitive readings of these texts, illuminating such issues as gender, sexual identity, and power. Her ideas are well grounded in abundant research: Harvey offers 15 pages of detailed notes and 11 pages of impressive bibliographic materials ranging from the years 1589 to 1992. J. S. Carducci; Winona State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1993
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Ventriloquized Voices is a fascinating examination of the appropriation of the feminine voice by male authors. In a historical and theoretical study of English texts of the early modern period, Elizabeth D. Harvey looks at the transvestism at work in texts which purport to be by women but which are in fact written by men. The crossing of gender in these ventriloquized works illuminates the discourses of patronage, medicine, madness and eroticism in English Renaissance society, revealing as it does the construction of sexuality, gender identity, and power. The author brilliantly juxtaposes such canonical works as John Donne's Anniversaries and Spenser's Faerie Queene with pamphlets on transvestism, midwifery books, and treatises on gynecology and hysteria. By interrogating the fashioning of gender within a broad range of Renaissance culture, Ventriloquized Voices investigates not only the relationship between men, women and language, but also crucial twentieth-century feminist debates such as essentialism and the female voice. This is a powerful and original work. It will be of vital interest to scholars and students of the Renaissance, as well as a wide range of feminist readers.
Long Description
"Ventriloquized Voices" is a fascinating examination of the appropriations of the feminine voice by male authors. In an historical and theoretical study of English texts of the early modern period, Elizabeth Harvey looks at the transvestism at work in the texts which purport to be by women but which are in fact written by men. The crossings of gender in these ventriloquized works reveals the construction of sexuality, gender identity, and power in English Renaissance society, illuminating as it does the discourses of patronage, medicine, madness, and eroticism. The author brilliantly juxtaposes such canonical works as John Donne's "Anniversaries" and Spenser's "Faerie Queene" with pamphlets on transvestism, midwifery books, and treatises on gynecology and hysteria. By interrogating the fashioning of gender within a broad range of Renaisssance culture, "Ventriloquized Voices" investigates not only the relationship between men, women, and language, but also crucial twentieth-century feminist debates such as essentialism and the female voice. This is a powerful and original work. It will be of vital interest to scholars and students of the Renaissance, as well as a wide range of feminist readers.
Main Description
Ventriloquized Voicesis a fascinating examination of the appropriations of the feminine voice by male authors. In an historical and theoretical study of English texts of the early modern period, Elizabeth Harvey looks at the transvestism at work in the texts which purport to be by women but which are in fact written by men. The crossings of gender in these ventriloquized works reveals the construction of sexuality, gender identity, and power in English Renaissance society, illuminating as it does the discourses of patronage, medicine, madness, and eroticism. The author brilliantly juxtaposes such canonical works as John Donne'sAnniversariesand Spenser'sFaerie Queenewith pamphlets on transvestism, midwifery books, and treatises on gynecology and hysteria. By interrogating the fashioning of gender within a broad range of Renaisssance culture,Ventriloquized Voicesinvestigates not only the relationship between men, women, andlanguage, but also crucial twentieth-century feminist debates such as essentialism and the female voice. This is a powerful and original work. It will be of vital interest to scholars and students of the Renaissance, as well as a wide range of feminist readers.
Main Description
Patronage, medicine, madness and eroticism. Harvey explores the discourse of power and sexuality in a fascinating range of early modern texts, and examines the use of the feminine voice by male authors.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Introduction: The Voice of Genderp. 1
Travesties of Voice: Cross-Dressing the Tonguep. 15
Folly and Hysteria: Duplicities of Speechp. 54
Matrix as Metaphor: Midwifery and Conception of Voicep. 76
Ventriloquizing Sappho, Or the Lesbian Musep. 116
Codap. 140
Notesp. 143
Referencesp. 158
Indexp. 168
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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