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This England : essays on the English nation and Commonwealth in the sixteenth century /
Patrick Collinson.
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
ix, 316 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0719084423, 9780719084423
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0719084423
9780719084423
catalogue key
8265464
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Patrick Collinson is Regius Professor Emeritus of Modern History at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Trinity College.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-05-01:
The late Collinson (emer., Cambridge) collected 11 previously published essays and added a new introduction for this book. The unifying theme is the idea that England in the age of Elizabeth I had become an "unofficial republic," a nation to which citizens owed their highest loyalty. The bonds creating a unified "monarchical republic" were language, religion, and history. To demonstrate his thesis, Collinson included essays dealing with each of these binding threads. As appropriate for a scholar best known for his work on religious topics, these selections all refer, in some degree, to the importance of the Reformation in England to the shaping of a national consciousness. In a short review, it is impossible to discuss each article separately, but all represent the mature thought of a noted historical craftsman. An asset of the collection is the footnotes, which cite current scholarship on almost all aspects of late-16th-century England. Readers should be aware that the idea of a "monarchical republic" has been challenged in John F. McDiarmid's edited collection, The Monarchical Republic of Early Modern England: Essays in Response to Patrick Collinson (2007). Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. Berlatsky emeritus, Wilkes University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2012
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Summaries
Main Description
'This England' is a celebration of 'Englishness' in the sixteenth century, explores the growing conviction of 'Englishness' through the rapidly developing English language; the reinforcement of cultural nationalism as a result of the Protestant Reformation; the national and international situation of England at a time of acute national catastrophe; and of Queen Elizabeth 1, the last of her line, remaining unmarried, refusing to even discuss the succession to her throne. Introducing students of the period to an aspect of history largely neglected in the current vogue for histories of the Tudors, Collinson investigates the rising role of English, of England's God-centredness, before focusing on the role of Elizabethans as citizens rather than mere subjects. It responds to a demand for a history which is no less social than political, investigates what it meant to be a citizen of England, living through the 1570's and 1580's.
Main Description
This England is a celebration of "Englishness" in the sixteenth century, which explores: the growing conviction of "Englishness" through the rapidly developing English language; the reinforcement of cultural nationalism as a result of the Protestant Reformation; the national and international situation of England at a time of acute national catastrophe; and of Queen Elizabeth I, the last of her line, remaining unmarried, refusing to even discuss the succession to her throne. Introducing students of the period to an aspect of history largely neglected in the current vogue for histories of the Tudors, Collinson investigates the rising role of English, of England's God-centerdness, before focusing on the role of Elizabethans as citizens rather than mere subjects. It responds to a demand for a history which is no less social than political, investigates what it meant to be a citizen of England, living through the 1570s and 1580s.
Table of Contents
List of abbreviationsp. vi
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introduction - This England: race, nation, patriotismp. 1
The politics of religion and the religion of politics in Elizabethan Englandp. 36
The Elizabethan exclusion crisis and the Elizabethan polityp. 61
Servants and citizens: Robert Beale and other Elizabethansp. 98
Pulling the strings: religion and politics in the progress of 1578p. 122
Elizabeth I and the verdicts of historyp. 143
Biblical rhetoric: the English nation and national sentiment in the prophetic modep. 167
John Foxe and national consciousnessp. 193
Truth, lies and fiction in sixteenth-century Protestant historiographyp. 216
One of us? William Camden and the making of historyp. 245
William Camden and the anti-myth of Elizabeth: setting the mould?p. 270
John Stow and nostalgic antiquarianismp. 287
Indexp. 309
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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