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Death and dying in colonial Spanish America /
edited by Martina Will de Chaparro and Miruna Achim.
imprint
Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2011.
description
vi, 276 p.
ISBN
0816529752 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780816529759 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2011.
isbn
0816529752 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780816529759 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8241219
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 255-262) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
The essays in this volume explore the intersections of cultures through recent scholarship related to death and dying in colonial Spanish America.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"These contributors ground their analysis on an impressive list of sources and in spite of their thematic and methodological diversity, these pieces are connected through common threads. The volume offers new insights on the history of death in colonial Peru and Mexico, a topic only a few authors have addressed in English in a systematic manner." --Javier Villa-Flores, author of Dangerous Speech: A Social History of Blasphemy in Colonial Mexico
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
When the Spanish colonized the Americas, they brought many cultural beliefs and practices with them, not the least of which involved death and dying. These essays explore the resulting intersections of cultures through recent scholarship related to death and dying in colonial Spanish America between the 16th and 18th centuries.
Main Description
When the Spanish colonized the Americas, they brought many cultural beliefs and practices with them, not the least of which involved death and dying. The essays in this volume explore the resulting intersections of cultures through recent scholarship related to death and dying in colonial Spanish America between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. The authors address such important questions as: What were the relationships between the worlds of the living and the dead? How were these relationships sustained not just through religious dog-ma and rituals but also through everyday practices? How was unnatural death defined within different population strata? How did demo-graphic and cultural changes affect mourning? The variety of sources uncovered in the authors' original archival research suggests the wide diversity of topics and approaches they employ: Nahua annals, Spanish chronicles, Inquisition case records, documents on land disputes, sermons, images, and death registers. Geographically, the range of research focuses on the viceroyalties of New Spain, Peru, and New Granada. The resulting records--both documentary and archaeological--offer us a variety of vantage points from which to view each of these cultural groups as they came into contact with others. Much less tied to modern national boundaries or old imperial ones, the many facets of the new historical research exploring the topic of death demonstrate that no attitudes or practices can be considered either "Western" or universal.
Main Description
When the Spanish colonized the Americas, they brought many cultural beliefs and practices with them, not the least of which involved death and dying. The essays in this volume explore the resulting intersections of cultures through recent scholarship related to death and dying in colonial Spanish America between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. The authors address such important questions as: What were the relationships between the worlds of the living and the dead? How were these relationships sustained not just through religious dog-ma and rituals but also through everyday practices? How was unnatural death defined within different population strata? How did demo-graphic and cultural changes affect mourning? The variety of sources uncovered in the authors' original archival research suggests the wide diversity of topics and approaches they employ: Nahua annals, Spanish chronicles, Inquisition case records, documents on land disputes, sermons, images, and death registers. Geographically, the range of research focuses on the viceroyalties of New Spain, Peru, and New Granada. The resulting records-both documentary and archaeological-offer us a variety of vantage points from which to view each of these cultural groups as they came into contact with others. Much less tied to modern national boundaries or old imperial ones, the many facets of the new historical research exploring the topic of death demonstrate that no attitudes or practices can be considered either “Western" or universal.
Table of Contents
From the Here to the Hereafter: An Introduction to Death and Dyingp. 1
Noble Nahuas, Faith, and Death: How the Indigenous Elite of the Colonial Puebla-Tlaxcala Valley Prepared to Perishp. 28
Reading the (Dead) Body: Histories of Suicide in New Spainp. 53
The Autopsy of Fray García Guerra: Corporal Meanings in Seventeenth -Century Mexicop. 78
The Death of the Monarch as Colonial Sacramentp. 100
Exemplary Punishment in Colonial Lima: The 1639 Auto de Fep. 121
Angelic Death and Sacrifice in Early Modern Hispanic Americap. 142
Medicine and the Dead: Conflicts over Burial Reform and Piety in Lima, 1808-1850p. 170
Notesp. 203
Select Bibliographyp. 255
About the Contributorsp. 263
Illustration Creditsp. 267
Indexp. 260
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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