Catalogue


The gentrification of the mind : witness to a lost imagination /
Sarah Schulman.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2012.
description
ix, 179 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0520264770 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520264779 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2012.
isbn
0520264770 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520264779 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8236788
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Sarah Schulman, as always, hits the nail on the head. I can't imagine a more insightful probe into gentrification and its inhumane consequences. Everyone needs to read this book." --Martin Duberman, author of Stonewall "Sarah Schulman's The Gentrification of the Mind is a bulwark against the collective loss of memory. AIDS, gentrification, the struggle for gay rights, the class war that has driven entire communities of artists, immigrants, and outsiders from the neighborhoods they created--all these things have been erased by the official culture. Schulman's book will make you rage and weep, and then--just maybe--organize." --Luc Sante, author of Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York "Hard-headed, sensitive, and informed, this book will make the confused world of urban redevelopment and gentrification make notably more sense. Schulman has a mind as clear as a bell in evening. You'll be glad you read it. I was." --Samuel R. Delany, author of Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders
Flap Copy
"Sarah Schulman, as always, hits the nail on the head. I can't imagine a more insightful probe into gentrification and its inhumane consequences. Everyone needs to read this book."--Martin Duberman, author of Stonewall "Sarah Schulman's The Gentrification of the Mind is a bulwark against the collective loss of memory. AIDS, gentrification, the struggle for gay rights, the class war that has driven entire communities of artists, immigrants, and outsiders from the neighborhoods they created--all these things have been erased by the official culture. Schulman's book will make you rage and weep, and then--just maybe--organize."--Luc Sante, author of Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York "Hard-headed, sensitive, and informed, this book will make the confused world of urban redevelopment and gentrification make notably more sense. Schulman has a mind as clear as a bell in evening. You'll be glad you read it. I was."--Samuel R. Delany, author of Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2012-03-02:
Schulman (English, CUNY, Staten Island; Ties That Bind: Familial Homophobia and Its Consequences), AIDS activist and writer of both fiction and nonfiction, describes this book as a "personal intellectual memoir" focusing not only on a generation's tragic losses to AIDS but on how, in the aftermath, society engaged in wholesale "memory loss." Schulman sees gentrification of neighborhoods once predominately LGBT as a factor, accompanied by a "spiritual gentrification" that made it convenient to marginalize the accomplishments of those lost. Ultimately, she believes it necessary to call to account individuals and institutions that enabled this "gentrification." Not surprisingly, her roster of villains includes U.S. Presidents, other government officials, religious clerics, and even self-styled gay spokespeople. She proposes a national AIDS memorial in New York City similar to that for 9/11, to remind us of the plague and its toll. Verdict While its insistence on the need to confront our past will surely make some readers uncomfortable, this bracing, powerful, and well-reasoned work reaffirms the author's stature as a distinctive American woman of letters. Ideal for an academic setting, it will also precipitate discussion among all those interested in learning more about this painful chapter in U.S. history. Highly recommended.-Richard Drezen, Brooklyn (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is why the book is so successful and demands our attention: through a focus on the pulse of the queer community (of the 80s), it touches upon the individual condition (of today)."-- Velvetpark
"A brilliant critique of contemporary culture. . . . This is the most important book of the year."
"A brilliant critique of contemporary culture. . . . This is the most important book of the year."-- Cult Mtl
"A galvanizing account of the transformation, both external and mental, in New York City life."
"A polemic, a passionate, provocative . . . account of disappearance, forgetfulness and untimely death."
"It's a beautifully written screed (not a bad word in my books). . . . Schulman shines when she taps her deep knowledge of the AIDS movement. . . . She can be brilliant."
"It's a beautifully written screed (not a bad word in my books). . . . Schulman shines when she taps her deep knowledge of the AIDS movement. . . . She can be brilliant."-- Now
"No book has rocked my world in recent times more than Sarah Schulman's 'The Gentrification of the Mind: Witness to a Lost Imagination' . . . [it ranks] among the best alternative histories published in the last 50 years."
"Schulman's personal recollections... are sharp and vivid."
"Schulman's personal recollections... are sharp and vivid."-- Gay & Lesbian Review/Worldwide
"Teeming with ideas, necessary commentary, refreshing connections and examination of the status quo."
"Teeming with ideas, necessary commentary, refreshing connections and examination of the status quo."-- Lambda Literary
"This bracing, powerful, and well-reasoned work reaffirms the author's stature as a distinctive American woman of letters. . . . Highly recommended."
"This bracing, powerful, and well-reasoned work reaffirms the author's stature as a distinctive American woman of letters. . . . Highly recommended."-- Library Journal
"This is a very good, very sad book about the aftershock of the AIDS crisis in New York. Schulman is a truly gifted thinker."
"This is a very good, very sad book about the aftershock of the AIDS crisis in New York. Schulman is a truly gifted thinker."-- Fader Magazine
"This is why the book is so successful and demands our attention: through a focus on the pulse of the queer community (of the 80s), it touches upon the individual condition (of today)."
"The book that's inspired me more than any other this year is Sarah Schulman's Gentrification of the Mind: Witness to a Lost Imagination, a razor-sharp memoir of New York in the heyday of the AIDS crisis."
"The book that's inspired me more than any other this year is Sarah Schulman's Gentrification of the Mind: Witness to a Lost Imagination, a razor-sharp memoir of New York in the heyday of the AIDS crisis."-- Slate
"The essence of what Schulman calls gentrification is to pretend that privilege and difference do not exist and that any attempt to remember that they do is mere 'political correctness' rather than facing up to the reality to who does what to whom. To forget these things, is to deceive ourselvesand Schulman's harsh, bitter prose is a useful way of waking ourselves up."
"The author, a true woman of letters, makes a persuasive case."
"The author, a true woman of letters, makes a persuasive case."-- Bay Area Reporter
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, March 2012
PW Annex Reviews, March 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
During the plague years of AIDS, from 1981 to 1996, cities like New York lost an astonishing number of young people, with over 80,000 deaths in that city alone. In this gripping memoir, Sarah Schulman recalls how much of the rebellious queer culture, cheap rents, and a vibrant downtown arts movement vanished almost overnight to be replaced by gay conservative spokespeople and mainstream consumerism. She links this phenomenon to the gentrification of 1970s New York City--wherein a "blighted" urban neighborhood was renovated, and the people who once called it home were priced out and replaced by suburban whites. Schulman takes us back to her Lower East Side and brings it to life, filling these pages with vivid memories of her avant-garde queer friends and dramatically recreating the early years of the AIDS crisis as experienced by a political insider. Interweaving personal reminiscence with cogent analysis, Schulman details her experience as a witness to the loss of a generation's imagination and the consequences of that loss.
Main Description
In this gripping memoir of the AIDS years (1981-1996), Sarah Schulman recalls how much of the rebellious queer culture, cheap rents, and a vibrant downtown arts movement vanished almost overnight to be replaced by gay conservative spokespeople and mainstream consumerism. Schulman takes us back to her Lower East Side and brings it to life, filling these pages with vivid memories of her avant-garde queer friends and dramatically recreating the early years of the AIDS crisis as experienced by a political insider. Interweaving personal reminiscence with cogent analysis, Schulman details her experience as a witness to the loss of a generation's imagination and the consequences of that loss.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this memoir of the AIDS years (1981-1996), Sarah Schulman recalls how much of the rebellious queer culture, cheap rents, and a vibrant downtown arts movement vanished almost overnight to be replaced by gay conservative spokespeople and mainstream consumerism.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Making Record from Memoryp. 1
Understanding the Past
The Dynamics of Death and Replacementp. 23
The Gentrification of AIDSp. 36
Realizing that they're Gonep. 53
The Consequences of Loss
The Gentrification of Creationp. 81
The Gentrification of Gay Politicsp. 111
The Gentrification of our Literaturep. 133
Conclusion: Degentrification├╣The Pleasure of Being Uncomfortablep. 154
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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