Catalogue


Tell me the story of how I conquered you : elsewheres and ethnosuicide in the colonial Mesoamerican world /
by José Rabasa.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2011.
description
xii, 264 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0292728751 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780292728752 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2011.
isbn
0292728751 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780292728752 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8236733
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-248) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
JOS RABASA teaches in the Department of Romance Languages at Harvard University. His previous books include Inventing America: Spanish Historiography and the Formation of Eurocentrism; Writing Violence on the Northern Frontier: The Historiography of Sixteenth-Century New Mexico and Florida and the Legacy of Conquest; and Without History: Subaltern Studies, the Zapatista Insurgency, and the Specter of History.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Presents a new understanding of the pictorial vocabulary presented in Codex Telleriano-Remensis, which reveals a native painter's perspective on the tandem of ethno-suicide and ethno-genesis, and the topology of conquest.
Main Description
Folio 46r from Codex Telleriano-Remensis was created in the sixteenth century under the supervision of Spanish missionaries in central Mexico. As an artifact of seismic cultural and political shifts, the manuscript painting is a singular document of indigenous response to Spanish conquest. Examining the ways in which the folio's tlacuilo (indigenous painter/writer) creates a pictorial vocabulary, this book embraces the place "outside" history from which this rich document emerged. Applying contemporary intellectual perspectives, including aspects of gender, modernity, nation, and visual representation itself, Jos Rabasa reveals new perspectives on colonial order. Folio 46r becomes a metaphor for reading the totality of the codex and for reflecting on the postcolonial theoretical issues now brought to bear on the past. Ambitious and innovative (such as the invention of the concepts of elsewheres and ethnosuicide, and the emphasis on intuition), Tell Me the Story of How I Conquered You embraces the performative force of the native scribe while acknowledging the ineffable traits of 46r--traits that remain untenably foreign to the modern excavator/scholar. Posing provocative questions about the unspoken dialogues between evangelizing friars and their spiritual conquests, this book offers a theoretic-political experiment on the possibility of learning from the tlacuilo ways of seeing the world that dislocate the predominance of the West.
Main Description
Folio 46r from Codex Telleriano-Remensis was created in the sixteenth century under the supervision of Spanish missionaries in central Mexico. As an artifact of seismic cultural and political shifts, the manuscript painting is a singular document of indigenous response to Spanish conquest. Examining the ways in which the folio's tlacuilo(indigenous painter/writer) creates a pictorial vocabulary, this book embraces the place "outside" history from which this rich document emerged. Applying contemporary intellectual perspectives, including aspects of gender, modernity, nation, and visual representation itself, Jos Rabasa reveals new perspectives on colonial order. Folio 46r becomes a metaphor for reading the totality of the codex and for reflecting on the postcolonial theoretical issues now brought to bear on the past. Ambitious and innovative (such as the invention of the concepts of elsewheres and ethnosuicide, and the emphasis on intuition), Tell Me the Story of How I Conquered Youembraces the performative force of the native scribe while acknowledging the ineffable traits of 46r--traits that remain untenably foreign to the modern excavator/scholar. Posing provocative questions about the unspoken dialogues between evangelizing friars and their spiritual conquests, this book offers a theoretic-political experiment on the possibility of learning from the tlacuiloways of seeing the world that dislocate the predominance of the West.
Main Description
Folio 46R from Codex Telleriano-Remensis was created in the sixteenth century under the supervision of Spanish missionaries in central Mexico. As an artifact of seismic cultural and political shifts, the manuscript painting is a singular document of indigenous response to Spanish conquest. Examining the ways in which the folio's tlacuilo (indigenous painter/writer) creates a pictorial vocabulary, this book embraces the place "outside" history from which this rich document emerged.Applying contemporary intellectual perspectives, including aspects of gender, modernity, nation, and visual representation itself, José Rabasa reveals new perspectives on colonial order. Folio 46R becomes a metaphor for reading the totality of the codex and for reflecting on the postcolonial theoretical issues now brought to bear on the past. Ambitious and innovative (such as the invention of the concepts of elsewheres and ethno-suicide, and the emphasis on intuition), Tell Me the Story of How I Conquered You embraces the performative force of the native scribe while acknowledging the ineffable traits of 46R--traits that remain untenably foreign to the modern excavator/scholar. Posing provocative questions about the unspoken dialogues between evangelizing friars and their spiritual conquests, this book offers a theoretic-political experiment on the possibility of learning from the tlacuilo ways of seeing the world that dislocate the predominance of the West.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Overturep. 1
Reading Folio 46rp. 18
Depicting Perspectivep. 37
The Dispute Of The Friarsp. 56
Topologies Of Conquestp. 91
öTell Me The Story Of How I Conquered You"p. 106
The Entrails Of Periodizationp. 130
(In)Comparable Worldsp. 162
Elsewheresp. 193
Notesp. 207
Bibliographyp. 233
Indexp. 249
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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