Catalogue


Literature suppressed on sexual grounds /
Dawn B. Sova ; preface by Ken Wachsberger.
edition
3rd ed.
imprint
New York, NY : Facts On File, c2011.
description
xxv, 422 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0816082294 (hbk. : acid-free paper), 9780816082292 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
series title
series title
imprint
New York, NY : Facts On File, c2011.
isbn
0816082294 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
9780816082292 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
catalogue key
8211724
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 361-376) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dawn B. Sova holds a Ph.D. from Drew University. She teaches English at Montclair State University and has served as a mentor for courses in American cinema at Thomas Edison State College. She is the author of Facts On File's Critical Companion to Edgar Allan Poe.
First Chapter
When Tolstoy's The Kreutzer Sonata was banned from distribution through the mail (except for first class) in 1890, New York street vendors began selling it from pushcarts carrying large signs reading Suppressed! In 1961, the United States Supreme Court pondered whether D.H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover was lewd or literary. In 1969, the novel was required reading in many college literature courses. Changing sexual mores have moved many formerly forbidden books out of locked cabinets and into libraries and classrooms. Literature Suppressed on Sexual Grounds, Third Edition examines the issues underlying the suppression of more than 120 works deemed sexually obscene. New and revised entries include:
America: The Book (Jon Stewart)
An American Tragedy (Theodore Dreiser)
The Arabian Nights (Sir Richard Burton, trans.)
The Art of Love (Ovid)
Forever (Judy Blume)
Gossip Girl series (Cecily von Ziegesar)
How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents (Julia Alvarez)
Lady Chatterly's Lover (D.H. Lawrence)
Lolita (Vladimir Nabokov)
Rabbit Run (John Updike)
Snow Falling on Cedars (David Guterson)
Song of Solomon (Toni Morrison)
This Boy's Life (Tobias Wolff)
Ulysses (James Joyce)
and more.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1998-06:
The aim of this four-volume set is to spotlight some 400 works that have been censored, banned, or condemned because of their political, social, religious, or sexual content. The entries, which include a summary, censorship history, and brief bibliography, range widely from Aristotle through Galileo and on up to Adolf Hitler and Judy Blume. Such well-known prohibited works as de Sade's 120 Days of Sodom, the Communist Manifesto, and Huckleberry Finn are included here, but so are many other works that are now less controversial, e.g., Milton's Areopagitica and Uncle Tom's Cabin. Some of the censorship histories are several pages long, but others are very short; Born on the Fourth of July gets only 50 words. Though most of the works are worth notice, too many describe fairly vapid objections: Fail-Safe was challenged by a school librarian who thought the book would undermine "America's confidence in their defense system." But as one might expect, many of the entries, such as the one for The Satanic Verses, are harrowing. Prepared by well-qualified scholars who have written and lectured extensively on censorship, the set is a very readable gathering of much useful information. It provides more depth and is more current than either Anne L. Haight's Banned Books (1978. 4th ed.) or ALA's Banned Books Resource Guide (1995). (Index not seen.)ÄPeter A. Dollard, Alma Coll. Lib., Mt. Pleasant, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2012-02-01:
The third edition of "Banned Books" features 41 new titles, expanding the four-volume series (previous reviews, rev. ed., CH, Mar'07, 44-3598, 44-3598a, 44-3598b, 44-3598c) to nearly 500 suppressed books. The set includes several popular contemporary works, such as the entire Harry Potter series, Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code, Phillip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy, and Stephanie Meyer's Twilight series. The large number of international titles indicates censorship's pervasiveness across cultures. All 12 additions to On Political Grounds, for example, are international in origin, including works by Nobel Prize winners Herta Muller (The Appointment, 2001) and Orhan Pamuk (Snow, 2004). Each volume updates entries by noting recent challenges, but large portions of the text remain unaltered from previous editions. No overlap exists between volumes: books banned for multiple reasons are featured only once in the series. Literary works remain the central focus, but numerous scientific and political texts are also featured. Karolides (Univ. of Wisconsin, River Falls), Bald (freelance journalist), and Sova (Montclair State Univ.) contribute introductions that discuss censorship within their subject areas and explore changes over the past half decade.Unyielding extremism and religious conservatism appear to be the major forces behind these suppressions, but two of the editors identify new, troubling trends. Sova suggests an increase in "preventative banning," wherein officials "neglect to purchase a book that has aroused controversy." In such cases, the books are never made available, which makes documenting instances of suppression extremely difficult. Likewise, Bald describes "preemptive censorship by publishers motivated by fear of violence," citing Jytte Klausen's The Cartoons That Shook the World (CH, May'10, 47-5266) as an example. The book discusses the protests over the controversial publication of 12 cartoons of Muhammad by a Danish newspaper in 2005. Klausen's publisher (Yale University Press) decided to remove examples of the images, fearing they might reignite the furor. When the Index on Censorship (CH, Dec'11, 49-xxxx) published an interview with Klausen about Yale's censorship, it likewise refused to publish the cartoons. That such esteemed publishers engage in self-censorship suggests the troubling extent of the censorship issue. As in earlier editions, every entry in this set contains a summary of the book, a censorship history, and a selection of further readings. Each volume includes a list of all titles covered by the series, arranged under the four main categories; however, a single, alphabetical list with category cross-references would be more useful, given the lack of a cumulative index. This minor complaint aside, the superb content of these titles makes them an excellent addition to libraries concerned with censorship issues. This set is indispensable for student projects during Banned Books Week. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and general readers. R. M. Roberts Lincoln Land Community College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
When Tolstoy's The Kreutzer Sonata was banned from distribution through the mail in 1890, New York street vendors began selling it from pushcarts. Changing sexual mores have moved many formerly forbidden books out of locked cabinets and into libraries and classrooms.
Main Description
Literature Suppressed on Sexual Grounds, Third Edition examines the issues underlying the suppression of more than 120 works deemed sexually obscene. New and revised entries include: America: The Book (Jon Stewart) An American Tragedy (Theodore Dreiser) The Arabian Nights (Sir Richard Burton, trans.) The Art of Love (Ovid) Forever (Judy Blume) Gossip Girl series (Cecily von Ziegesar) How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents (Julia Alvarez) Lady Chatterly's Lover (D.H. Lawrence) Lolita (Vladimir Nabokov) Rabbit Run (John Updike) Snow Falling on Cedars (David Guterson) Song of Solomon (Toni Morrison) This Boy's Life (Tobias Wolff) Ulysses (James Joyce) and more.
Main Description
When Tolstoy's The Kreutzer Sonata was banned from distribution through the mail (except for first class) in 1890, New York street vendors began selling it from pushcarts carrying large signs reading ôSuppressed!ö In 1961, the United States Supreme Court pondered whether D. H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover was lewd or literary. By 1969, the novel was required reading in many college literature courses. Changing sexual mores have moved many formerly forbidden books out of locked cabinets and into libraries and classrooms.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. xiii
Works Discussed in This Volumep. xvii
Literature Suppressed on Sexual Groundsp. 1
Biographical Profilesp. 339
Bibliographyp. 361
Works Discussed in the Other Volumes of This Seriesp. 377
Indexp. 403
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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