Catalogue


In the cause of freedom : radical Black internationalism from Harlem to London, 1917-1939 /
Minkah Makalani.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2011.
description
xviii, 309 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0807835048 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807835043 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2011.
isbn
0807835048 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807835043 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Straight socialism or negro-ology? Diaspora, Harlem, and the institutions of Black radicalism -- Liberating Negroes everywhere: Cyril Briggs, the African Blood Brotherhood, and radical pan-africanism -- With all forces menacing empire: Black and Asian radicals internationalize the Third International -- An outcast here as outside: nationality, class, and building racial unity -- An incessant struggle against White supremacy: anticolonial struggles and Black international connections -- The rise of a Black international: George Padmore and the International Trade Union Committee of Negro Workers -- An international African opinion: diasporic London and Black radical intellectual production -- Epilogue: a vitality and validity of its own.
catalogue key
8211660
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [271]-295) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Makalani reveals how early-twentieth-century black radicals organized an international movement centered on ending racial oppression, colonialism, class exploitation, and global white supremacy. Focused primarily on two organizations, the Harlem-based African Blood Brotherhood and the International African Service Bureau, In the Cause of Freedom examines the ideas, initiatives, and networks of interwar black radicals, as well as how they communicated across continents.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-10-01:
This fine study of black internationalism deals with the years from 1917 to the onset of WW II. Makalani (Texas) covers the Garvey movement, which on occasion viewed the Russian Revolution favorably, and a number of new organizations and leaders. The author also traces relations between such groups and the Communist International. The focus is upon race, colonialism, and class struggle as components of a liberation movement. Among personalities involved, Makalani considers George Padmore, who headed the Comintern's Negro Bureau, to have been central. The broad Sanhedrin All-Race Conference sought to survey the gamut of social, economic, and political interests but ignored labor, peonage, lynching, and the franchise. Makalani observes that this organization exacted an unexpected toll on the radical African Blood Brotherhood (ABB), and its Harlem headquarters ceased to function. Within months, many ABB's activists had joined the Workers Party, contributing to Communist influence among blacks. Makalani makes the point that the New Negro activists fed into civil rights and black power workers, noting a continuum that scholars have too often ignored. Anyone seriously interested in domestic or international aspects of black life has much to gain from a careful reading of Makalani's work. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. H. Shapiro emeritus, University of Cincinnati
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Establishes a learned, provocative, and innovative beachhead in the areas of transnational diaspora history and the history of the Left." - Journal of American History
"[A] fine study of black internationalism. . . . Anyone seriously interested in domestic or international aspects of black life has much to gain from a careful reading of Makalani's work. Highly recommended. All levels/libraries." - Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2012
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Summaries
Main Description
In this intellectual history, Minkah Makalani reveals how early-twentieth-century black radicals organized an international movement centered on ending racial oppression, colonialism, class exploitation, and global white supremacy. Focused primarily on two organizations, the Harlem-based African Blood Brotherhood, whose members became the first black Communists in the United States, and the International African Service Bureau, the major black anticolonial group in 1930s London, In the Cause of Freedom examines the ideas, initiatives, and networks of interwar black radicals, as well as how they communicated across continents. Through a detailed analysis of black radical periodicals and extensive research in U.S., English, Dutch, and Soviet archives, Makalani explores how black radicals thought about race; understood the ties between African diasporic, Asian, and international workers' struggles; theorized the connections between colonialism and racial oppression; and confronted the limitations of international leftist organizations. Considering black radicals of Harlem and London together for the first time, In the Cause of Freedom reorients the story of blacks and Communism from questions of autonomy and the Kremlin's reach to show the emergence of radical black internationalism separate from, and independent of, the white Left.

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