Catalogue


Sovereignty after empire : comparing the Middle East and Central Asia /
edited by Sally N. Cummings and Raymond Hinnebusch.
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2011.
description
xi, 396 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0748643044 (hbk.), 9780748643042 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2011.
isbn
0748643044 (hbk.)
9780748643042 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8211504
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 346-390) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Sally N. Cummings is a Senior Lecturer in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews. Raymond Hinnebusch is a Professor in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.
Reviews
Review Quotes
In this innovative book, leading international scholars compare notes on the experiences of post-Soviet Central Asia and the successor states of the Ottoman Empire. Theoretically rigorous and informed by important new research, each contributor sheds original light on these diverse Muslim states' transition from empire to sovereignty. A common cultural legacy grounded in Islamic history and a present reliance on hydrocarbons makes this study of two geostrategic regions required reading for scholars and decision makers alike.
'Offering a novel way to understand the political structures of states in two significant areas of the non-European world, this book will make a significant contribution to thinking about the development of the state systems in the former colonial world.'
This is an excellent study of the impact of empire on the post-colonial state and challenges the idea of a sharp break between empire and sovereignty. With its cutting-edge comparison of the Middle East and Central Asia, this is an impressive comparative historical and political analysis which will be a valuable and lasting contribution to the academic literature.
This rich collection provides a thoughtful analysis of imperial rule and the meaning of sovereignty in the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia. The contributions investigate the impact of the colonial experience on the subsequent trajectories of the ruled, and for their place in a dynamic and changing world.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
'A common cultural legacy grounded in Islamic history and a present reliance on hydrocarbons makes this study of two geostrategic regions required reading for scholars and decision makers alike.'Eugene Rogan, Director of The Middle East Centre, University of Oxford'An impressive comparative historical and political analysis which will be a valuable and lasting contribution to the academic literature.'Professor Roland Dannreuther, Head of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster'This rich collection provides a thoughtful analysis of imperial rule and the meaning of sovereignty in the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia.'William Fierman, Indiana University/How does empire affect the route to successor sovereign state systems and the features of the sovereignty of these systems?/Empire matters for post-imperial outcomes, as is shown in this comparative study of the Middle East and Central Asia. The imperial creation of states in MENA and Central Asia explains several similarities in both regions' successor states. Differences in imperial heritages also partly account for the greater instability of the MENA states system and their lesser legitimacy.While eventually the imperial relation to an external metropole came to an end, the social patterns and institutional practices forged in these relationships remained; some only as traces, but others that endured in the transformation of empire into something else, a national sovereignty which should be seen as more than 'neo-colonialism' but less than 'total independence'. This challenges the view of an automatic linear progression from empire to sovereignty and indeed, suggests the two conditions can and do co-exist.Sally N. Cummings is a Senior Lecturer in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.Raymond Hinnebusch is a Professor in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.
Back Cover Copy
AUTHOR APPROVED'Offering a novel way to understand the political structures of states in two significant areas of the non-European world, this book will make a significant contribution to thinking about the development of the state systems in the former colonial world.'Roger Owen, Professor of Middle East History (Harvard)'Theoretically rigorous and informed by important new research, each contributor sheds original light on these diverse Muslim states' transition from empire to sovereignty... required reading for scholars and decision makers alike.'Eugene Rogan, Director of The Middle East Centre, University of Oxford'An impressive comparative historical and political analysis which will be a valuable and lasting contribution to the academic literature.'Professor Roland Dannreuther, Head of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster'This rich collection provides a thoughtful analysis of imperial rule and the meaning of sovereignty in the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia.'William Fierman, Indiana University/How does empire affect the route to successor sovereign state systems and the features of the sovereignty of these systems?/Empire matters for post-imperial outcomes, as is shown in this comparative study of the Middle East and Central Asia. The imperial creation of states in MENA and Central Asia explains several similarities in both regions' successor states. Differences in imperial heritages also partly account for the greater instability of the MENA states system and their lesser legitimacy.While eventually the imperial relation to an external metropole came to an end, the social patterns and institutional practices forged in these relationships remained; some only as traces, but others that endured in the transformation of empire into something else, a national sovereignty which should be seen as more than 'neo-colonialism' but less than 'total independence'. This challenges the view of an automatic linear progression from empire to sovereignty and indeed, suggests the two conditions can and do co-exist.Sally N. Cummings is a Senior Lecturer in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.Raymond Hinnebusch is a Professor in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.
Back Cover Copy
AUTHOR APPROVED'Offering a novel way to understand the political structures of states in two significant areas of the non-European world, this book will make a significant contribution to thinking about the development of the state systems in the former colonial world.' Roger Owen, Professor of Middle East History, Harvard University'Theoretically rigorous and informed by important new research, each contributor sheds original light on these diverse Muslim states' transition from empire to sovereignty... required reading for scholars and decision makers alike.'Eugene Rogan, Director of the Middle East Centre, University of Oxford'An impressive comparative historical and political analysis which will be a valuable and lasting contribution to the academic literature.'Roland Dannreuther, Professor and Head of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster'This rich collection provides a thoughtful analysis of imperial rule and the meaning of sovereignty in the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia.'William Fierman, Professor of Eurasian Studies, Indiana University/How does empire affect the route to successor sovereign state systems and the features of the sovereignty of these systems?/Empire matters for post-imperial outcomes, as is shown in this comparative study of the Middle East and Central Asia. The imperial creation of states in MENA and Central Asia explains several similarities in both regions' successor states. Differences in imperial heritages also partly account for the greater instability of the MENA states system and its lesser legitimacy.While eventually the imperial relation to an external metropole came to an end, the social patterns and institutional practices forged in these relationships remained; some only as traces, but others that endured in the transformation of empire into something else, a national sovereignty which should be seen as more than 'neo-colonialism' but less than 'total independence'. This challenges the view of an automatic linear progression from empire to sovereignty and indeed, suggests the two conditions can and do co-exist.Sally N. Cummings is a Senior Lecturer in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.Raymond Hinnebusch is a Professor in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.
Back Cover Copy
ENDORSEMENTS TO FOLLOW/How does empire affect the route to successor sovereign state systems and the features of the sovereignty of these systems?/Empire matters for post-imperial outcomes, as is shown in this comparative study of the Middle East and Central Asia. The imperial creation of states in MENA and Central Asia explains several similarities in both regions' successor states. Differences in imperial heritages also partly account for the greater instability of the MENA states system and their lesser legitimacy.While eventually the imperial relation to an external metropole came to an end, the social patterns and institutional practices forged in these relationships remained; some only as traces, but others that endured in the transformation of empire into something else, a national sovereignty which should be seen as more than 'neo-colonialism' but less than 'total independence'. This challenges the view of an automatic linear progression from empire to sovereignty and indeed, suggests the two conditions can and do co-exist.Key Features*Combines theory and empirical evidence*Makes systematic comparisons between the Middle East and Central Asia*Includes chapters from leading scholars from history, politics and international relations*Presents the findings of a focused collective research projectSally N. Cummings is a Senior Lecturer in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.Raymond Hinnebusch is a Professor in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.
Back Cover Copy
ENDORSEMENTS TO FOLLOW"This rich collection provides a thoughtful analysis of imperial rule and the meaning of sovereignty in the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia. The contributions investigate the impact of the colonial experience on the subsequent trajectories of the ruled, and for their place in a dynamic and changing world."William Fierman, Indiana University/How does empire affect the route to successor sovereign state systems and the features of the sovereignty of these systems?/Empire matters for post-imperial outcomes, as is shown in this comparative study of the Middle East and Central Asia. The imperial creation of states in MENA and Central Asia explains several similarities in both regions' successor states. Differences in imperial heritages also partly account for the greater instability of the MENA states system and their lesser legitimacy.While eventually the imperial relation to an external metropole came to an end, the social patterns and institutional practices forged in these relationships remained; some only as traces, but others that endured in the transformation of empire into something else, a national sovereignty which should be seen as more than 'neo-colonialism' but less than 'total independence'. This challenges the view of an automatic linear progression from empire to sovereignty and indeed, suggests the two conditions can and do co-exist.Key Features*Combines theory and empirical evidence*Makes systematic comparisons between the Middle East and Central Asia*Includes chapters from leading scholars from history, politics and international relations*Presents the findings of a focused collective research projectSally N. Cummings is a Senior Lecturer in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.Raymond Hinnebusch is a Professor in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.
Back Cover Copy
ENDORSEMENTS TO FOLLOW"This rich collection provides a thoughtful analysis of imperial rule and the meaning of sovereignty in the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia. The contributions investigate the impact of the colonial experience on the subsequent trajectories of the ruled, and for their place in a dynamic and changing world."William Fierman, Indiana University SThis is an excellent study of the impact of empire on the post-colonial state and challenges the idea of a sharp break between empire and sovereignty. With its cutting-edge comparison of the Middle East and Central Asia, this is an impressive comparative historical and political analysis which will be a valuable and lasting contribution to the academic literature"Professor Roland Danreuther, Head of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster/How does empire affect the route to successor sovereign state systems and the features of the sovereignty of these systems?/Empire matters for post-imperial outcomes, as is shown in this comparative study of the Middle East and Central Asia. The imperial creation of states in MENA and Central Asia explains several similarities in both regions' successor states. Differences in imperial heritages also partly account for the greater instability of the MENA states system and their lesser legitimacy.While eventually the imperial relation to an external metropole came to an end, the social patterns and institutional practices forged in these relationships remained; some only as traces, but others that endured in the transformation of empire into something else, a national sovereignty which should be seen as more than 'neo-colonialism' but less than 'total independence'. This challenges the view of an automatic linear progression from empire to sovereignty and indeed, suggests the two conditions can and do co-exist.Key Features*Combines theory and empirical evidence*Makes systematic comparisons between the Middle East and Central Asia*Includes chapters from leading scholars from history, politics and international relations*Presents the findings of a focused collective research projectSally N. Cummings is a Senior Lecturer in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.Raymond Hinnebusch is a Professor in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.
Back Cover Copy
ENDORSEMENT TO FOLLOW/How does empire affect the route to successor sovereign state systems and the features of the sovereignty of these systems?/Empire matters for post-imperial outcomes, as is shown in this comparative study of the Middle East and Central Asia. The imperial creation of states in MENA and Central Asia explains several similarities in both regions' successor states. Differences in imperial heritages also partly account for the greater instability of the MENA states system and their lesser legitimacy.While eventually the imperial relation to an external metropole came to an end, the social patterns and institutional practices forged in these relationships remained; some only as traces, but others that endured in the transformation of empire into something else, a national sovereignty which should be seen as more than 'neo-colonialism' but less than 'total independence'. This challenges the view of an automatic linear progression from empire to sovereignty and indeed, suggests the two conditions can and do co-exist.Key Features*Combines theory and empirical evidence*Makes systematic comparisons between the Middle East and Central Asia*Includes chapters from leading scholars from history, politics and international relations*Presents the findings of a focused collective research projectSally N. Cummings is a Senior Lecturer in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.Raymond Hinnebusch is a Professor in the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.
Description for Reader
How does empire affect the route to successor sovereign state systems and the features of the sovereignty of these systems? This unique systematic comparison of empires and of their consequences for sovereignty in the Middle East and Central Asia brings theory on empire and sovereignty to bear on empirical variation across the two regions. The novel approach to understanding the political structures of states in two significant areas of the non-European world offers an important comparative discussion of post-imperial development and sovereignty. It raises a clear set of research questions about variations of imperial practice and puts forward an attractive and persuasive case that imperial legacy has been an important variable in the post-independence period.
Description for Teachers/Educators
Empire; Middle Eastern/ Central Asian/ Post-Soviet Politics; Comparative Politics
Main Description
A comparative study of empire in the Middle East and Central Asia.Empire matters for post-imperial outcomes, as is shown in this comparative study. The imperial creation of states in MENA and Central Asia explains several similarities in both regions' successor states. Differences in imperial heritages also partly account for the greater instability of the MENA states system and their lesser legitimacy.While eventually the imperial relation to an external metropole came to an end, the social patterns and institutional practices forged in these relationships remained; some only as traces, but others that endured in the transformation of empire into something else, a national sovereignty which should be seen as more than 'neo-colonialism' but less than 'total independence'. This challenges the view of an automatic linear progression from empire to sovereignty and indeed, suggests the two conditions can and do co-exist.Key Features*Combines theory and empirical evidence*Makes systematic comparisons between the Middle East and Central Asia*Includes chapters from leading scholars from history, politics and international relations*Presents the findings of a focused collective research project
Main Description
How does empire affect the route to successor sovereign state systems and the features of the sovereignty of these systems?Empire matters for post-imperial outcomes, as is shown in this comparative study of the Middle East and Central Asia. The imperial creation of states in MENA and Central Asia explains several similarities in both regions' successor states. Differences in imperial heritages also partly account for the greater instability of the MENA states system and their lesser legitimacy.While eventually the imperial relation to an external metropole came to an end, the social patterns and institutional practices forged in these relationships remained; some only as traces, but others that endured in the transformation of empire into something else, a national sovereignty which should be seen as more than 'neo-colonialism' but less than 'total independence'. This challenges the view of an automatic linear progression from empire to sovereignty and indeed, suggests the two conditions can and do co-exist.Key Features*Combines theory and empirical evidence*Makes systematic comparisons between the Middle East and Central Asia*Includes chapters from leading scholars from history, politics and international relations*Presents the findings of a focused collective research project
Main Description
How does empire affect the route to successor sovereign state systems and the features of the sovereignty of these systems? Empire matters, for post-imperial outcomes, as shown in this comparative study of the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) and Central Asia. The imperial creation of states there explains several similarities in both regions' successor states, while, differences in imperial heritages also partly account for the greater instability of the MENA states system and its lesser legitimacy. As the imperial relation to an external metropole eventually came to an end, the social patterns and institutional practices forged in these relationships remained. Some remained only as traces; others, that endured in the transformation of empire, as something else - a national sovereignty which should be seen as more than 'neo-colonialism' but less than 'total independence'. This challenges the view of an automatic linear progression from empire to sovereignty and, indeed, suggests that the two conditions can and do co-exist. Book jacket.
Main Description
How does empire affect the route to successor sovereign state systems and the features of the sovereignty of these systems?This unique systematic comparison of empires and of their consequences for sovereignty in the Middle East and Central Asia brings theory on empire and sovereignty to bear on empirical variation across the two regions. The novel approach to understanding the political structures of states in two significant areas of the non-European world offers an important comparative discussion of post-imperial development and sovereignty. It raises a clear set of research questions about variations of imperial practice and puts forward an attractive and persuasive case that imperial legacy has been an important variable in the post-independence period.
Main Description
This unique systematic comparison of empires and of their consequences for sovereignty in the middle East and Central Asia brings theory on empire and sovereignty to bear on empirical variation across the two regions. The novel approach to understanding the political structures of states in two significant areas of the non-European world offers an important comparative discussion of post-imperial development and sovereignty. It raises a clear set of research questions about variations of imperial practice and puts forward and attractive and persuasive case that imperial legacy has been an important variable int he post-independence period.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Notes on the Contributorsp. viii
Introductionp. 1
Histories of Empire and After
Russian Empiresp. 25
The British and French Empires in the Arab World: Some Problems of Colonial State-formation and its Legacyp. 44
Ottoman Legacies and Economic Sovereignty in Post-imperial Anatolia, Syria and Iraqp. 66
Paths to Sovereignty: Views from the Core and Periphery
Sovereignty in the Ottoman Empire and Afterp. 91
Mandated Sovereignty? The Role of International Law in the Construction of Arab Statehood during and after Empirep. 104
Reluctant Sovereigns? Central Asian States' Path to Independencep. 127
Empire and Domestic Sovereignty
The Middle East after Empire: Sovereignty and Institutionsp. 157
Sovereignty after Empire: The Colonial Roots of Central Asian Authoritarianismp. 178
Empire and Popular Sovereignty
Culture, Colonialism and Sovereignty in Central Asiap. 199
Culture in the Middle East: The "Western Question" and the Sovereignty of Post-imperial States in the Middle Eastp. 222
Pathways of Islamist Mobilization against the State in the Middle East and Central Asiap. 242
Empire and External Sovereignty
Empire and State formation: Contrary Tangents in Jordan and Syriap. 263
Rentierism, Dependency and Sovereignty in Central Asiap. 282
Tajikistan: From de facto Colony to Sovereign Dependencyp. 304
Conclusionsp. 326
Bibliographyp. 346
indexp. 391
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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