Catalogue


English women's poetry, 1649-1714 : politics, community, and linguistic authority /
Carol Barash.
imprint
Oxford [England] ; New York : Clarendon Press, 1996.
description
xii, 345 p. : ill.
ISBN
0198119739
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford [England] ; New York : Clarendon Press, 1996.
isbn
0198119739
catalogue key
820986
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-09:
This is a clearly written, well-argued, and informative book about the political and private poems of women in the period following the Restoration. Barash (Seton Hall Univ.) has previously contributed essays to Women, Writing, History, 1640-1740, ed. by Isobel Grundy and Susan Wiseman (1992), and Gulliver's Travels, ed. by Christopher Fox (1995). Here she argues that women poets began as political and/or court writers and that, like their male counterparts, they assumed personas. The distinctive voices these women eventually developed are illustrated by careful examination of manuscript copies and of first editions. Detailed accounts of Mary of Modena as a "model of women's artists," of Katherine Philips as a political writer, and of the literary careers of Jane Barker and Anne Finch strengthen a book that concentrates on writers and contexts without falling victim to theory. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates through faculty. J. Wilkinson; emeritus, Youngstown State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Carol Barash's English Women's Poetry, 1649-1714 continues the important work of recovering the sources, contexts, and traditions within which early modern English women wrote.'Claudia N. Thomas
'It is a work of scholarship, and its importance is attested to by its publication by an arm of the prestigious Oxford University Press. ... While this book will probably be of most interest to scholars, Barash's lucid writing style and the intriguing women she details should also bringpleasure, and enlightenment, to anyone who cares about the history, and politics, of English poetry.'The Sunday Star-Ledger, 13 July 1997
...substanital achievement. - Brean Hammond. British Journal for 18th C Studies. Vol 21 1998.
'the readings offered in this densely written book are sometimes as cryptic and arcane as the materials it so lovingly explores'Times Literary Supplement
"This is a clearly written, well-argued, and informative book."--Choice "It is a work of scholarship...Barash's lucid writing style and the intriguing women she details should also bring pleasure, and enlightenment, to anyone who cares about the history, and politics, of English poetry."--The Sunday Star-Ledger
"This is a clearly written, well-argued, and informative book."-- Choice "It is a work of scholarship...Barash's lucid writing style and the intriguing women she details should also bring pleasure, and enlightenment, to anyone who cares about the history, and politics, of English poetry."-- The Sunday Star-Ledger
'Carol Barash's English Women's Poetry, 1649-1714 continues the important work of recovering the sources, contexts, and traditions within which early modern English women wrote.'Claudia N. Thomas'the readings offered in this densely written book are sometimes as cryptic and arcane as the materials it so lovingly explores'Times Literary Supplement'It is a work of scholarship, and its importance is attested to by its publication by an arm of the prestigious Oxford University Press. ... While this book will probably be of most interest to scholars, Barash's lucid writing style and the intriguing women she details should also bring pleasure, and enlightenment, to anyone who cares about the history, and politics, of English poetry.'The Sunday Star-Ledger, 13 July 1997...substanital achievement. - Brean Hammond. British Journal for 18th C Studies. Vol 21 1998.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1997
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study reconstructs the political origins of English women's poetry, showing that the women's poetic tradition developed as part of the larger political shifts between 1649 and 1714. Women poets were particularly fascinated with the female monarch.
Long Description
This is the first study to reconstruct the political origins of English women's poetry between the execution of Charles I and the death of Queen Anne. Carol Barash's book shows that, between Katherine Philips (1632-1664) and Anne finch, Countess of Winchilsea (1661-1720), and English women's poetic tradition developed as part of the larger political shifts in these years and particularly in women's fascination with the figure of the female monarch. Writers discussed include Aphra Behn, Katherine Philips, Anne Killigrew, Jane Barker, and Anne Finch.
Long Description
This study reconstructs the political origins of English women's poetry between the execution of Charles I and the death of Queen Anne. Drawing on extensive archival research in England and the United States, Barash argues that ideas about women's voices and women's communities were crucial to the shaping of an English national literature after the civil wars. Women entered print culture--as poets and as women--by situating their writing in defence of embattled monarchy. In particular, Barash points to women poets' fascination with the figure of the female monarch (both real and mythic). Their sense of poetic legitimacy derives from the communities they generate around figures of female authority, particularly James II's second wife, Mary of Modena, and later Queen Anne. Writers discussed include Aphra Behn, Katherine Philips, Anne Killigrew, Jane Barker, and Anne Finch.
Main Description
The Poetry of Oppostion and Revolution is an important new study of the relation betweeb peotry and politics in English literature from Dryden to Wordsworth. Builing on his argument in Poetry and the Realm of Politics: Shakespeare to Dryden (also available from OUP), Howard Erskine-Hillreveals thaat the major tradition of political allusion is not, as has often been argued, that of the political allegory and overtly political poems, but rather a moreshifting and less systematic practice, often involving equivocal or multiple reference. Drawing on the revisionist trend on recent hidtoriography, the book offrs new and though-provoking readings of familiar texts. Dryden's Aenid version and Pope's Rape of the Lock; and a Jocobite emotion isidentified in The Vanity of Human Wishes. Taking issue with recent New Historicist Romantic criticism, the concluding chapters argue that what have seemed to so many to be traces of covert political displacemnt or erasure in Wordsworth are in fact marks of a continuing political preoccupation,which found new forms after the collapse of the Enlightment programme into the Jacobin terror
Main Description
This is the first study to reconstruct the political origins of English women's poetry between the execution of Charles I and the death of Queen Anne. Carol Barash's book shows that, between Katherine Philips (1632-64) and Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea (1661-1720), an English women'spoetic tradition developed as part of the larger political shifts in these years, and particularly in women writers' fascination with the figure of the female monarch. Writers discussed include Aphra Behn, Katherine Philips, Anne Killigrew, Jane Barker, and Anne Finch. Based on extensive archival research in England and the United States, English Women's Poetry, 1649-1714 argues that ideas about women's voices and women's communities were crucial to the shaping of an English national literature after the civil wars. Women enter print culture - as poets and aswomen - by situating their writing in defence of embattled monarchy. Women poets are especially fascinated with the figure of the female monarch (both real and mythic). Their sense of poetic legitimacy derives from the communities they generate around figures of female authority, particularly JamesII's second wife, Mary of Modena, and later Queen Anne.
Main Description
This study reconstructs the political origins of English women's poetry between the execution of Charles I and the death of Queen Anne. Based on extensive archival research in England and the United States, Barash argues that ideas about women's voices and women's communities were crucial to the shaping of an English national literature after the civil wars. Women entered print culture--as poets and as women--by situating their writing in defence of embattled monarchy. In particular, Barash points to women poets' fascination with the figure of the female monarch (both real and mythic). Their sense of poetic legitimacy derives from the communities they generate around figures of female authority, particularly James II's second wife, Mary of Modena, and later Queen Anne. Writers discussed include Aphra Behn, Katherine Philips, Anne Killigrew, Jane Barker, and Anne Finch.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Origins
English and Continental Origins: Queens, Heroes, Prophets
Women's Community and the Exiled King: Katherine Philip's Society of Friendship
Eros, Myth, and Monarchy in Aphra Behn
Elaborations
The Female Monarch and the Woman Poet: Mary of Modena, Anne Killigrew, Jane Barker
Queen Anne among the Poets
Anne Finch: Gender, Politics, and Myths of the Private Self Conclusion
Appendices
Order of poems in Katherine Philip's manuscripts and Poems
Lucasia poems in approximate order of events described
Anne Killigrew's paintings
John Chatwin's 'To the Pious Memory of Mrs Anne Killigrew
A Pindarique'
Order of poems in Jane Barker, Political recreations (1688)
Order of poems in Magdalen College MS. 343, Barker's 'Poems on Several Occasions, in 3 Parts'
'An Elegy on the Death of K. James'
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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