Catalogue


Edmund Spenser's war on Lord Burghley /
Bruce Danner.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
xiv, 264 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230299032 (hardback), 9780230299030 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230299032 (hardback)
9780230299030 (hardback)
catalogue key
8209717
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-06-01:
A long-standing puzzle in Spenser scholarship has been the reason for Spenser's insulting allusions to the powerful and influential William Cecil, Lord Burghley, in his 1591 Complaints and in the 1596 edition of The Faerie Queene. Spenser indicates that Burghley initiated the conflict through an unmerited attack on Spenser's work, but when and why has been debated, with many critics looking to events that occurred years earlier. Danner argues that Burghley must have read portions of the 1590 Faerie Queene as alluding to Edward De Vere's marriage to and abuse of Burghley's daughter Anne. Burghley's displeasure cost Spenser the career at court that he had anticipated, and Spenser in turn attacked him in the 1591 Complaints. That 1591 volume was censored and recalled by the government (i.e., by Burghley), and Spenser renewed the attack in the 1596 Faerie Queene. Clearly written and argued, the book is accessible to undergraduates, though few will know most of the poems that the book considers. The endnotes include full bibliographical data, but the book has no separate bibliography. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty, and the occasional upper-division undergraduate. B. E. Brandt South Dakota State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'While Danner gives convincing accounts of individual poems, the revisionary power of his book lies in its making Edmund Spenser "s Complaints central to the understanding of his life. By contextualizing the volume ”especially Mother Hubberds Tale, The Ruines of Time, and Virgils Gnat ”in 1591, he illuminates Spenser "s estrangement from Elizabeth "s court and suggests the dimensions of his boldness in attacking Lord Burghley, the most powerful man in Elizabethan England. In his introduction Danner performs the coup de grace on Greenlaw "s moribund thesis about Spenser "s supposed disgrace in 1579, and substitutes his own bold hypothesis about the causes of Burghley "s enmity. As it develops its thesis, the book gives unusually careful attention to contemporary understandings of the Complaints and to the poet "s self-presentation in its poems. It marks an important shift in Spenserian biography.' - William Oram, Smith College, USA
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Here, Edmund Spenser's censored attacks on Lord Burghley serve as the basis for a reassessment of the poet's mid-career, challenging the dates of canonical texts, the social and personal contexts for scandalous topical allegories, and the new historicist portrait of Spenser's 'worship' of power and state ideology.
Main Description
Edmund Spenser's censored attacks on Lord Burghley (Elizabeth I's powerful first minister) serve as the basis for a reassessment of the poet's mid-career, challenging the dates of canonical texts, the social and personal contexts for scandalous topical allegories, and the new historicist portrait of Spenser's 'worship' of power and state ideology.
Description for Bookstore
Edmund Spenser's censored attacks on William Cecil, Lord Burghley (Elizabeth I's powerful first minister) serve as the basis for a comprehensive reassessment of the poet's mid-career
Long Description
Despite their literary, historical, and biographical significance, Edmund Spenser "s attacks on William Cecil, Lord Burghley, have never been the focus of significant critique. These assaults on the Lord Treasurer "s character and judgment rank among the era "s most politically-charged literary writings, provoking censorship of the 1591 Complaints, deflecting the author from his Virgilian-inspired persona as a voice of the state, and intruding a bitter pessimism into his gestures of self-presentation throughout the 1590s. Danner "s study examines the poet "s attacks on Elizabeth I "s powerful first minister, reassesses the timeline of events that led to them, and argues for their centrality in Spenser "s increased self-definition as a political and cultural outsider. Interweaving the methods of both literary analysis and critical biography, Edmund Spenser "s War on Lord Burghley challenges the established dates of canonical texts, the social and personal contexts for scandalous topical allegories, and the new historicist portrait of Spenser "s Sworship of power and state ideology.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
List of Illustrations
Introduction
The 1590 Faerie Queene and the Origins of 'A Mighty Peres Displeasure'
Lord Burghley and the Oxford Marriage
The Faerie Queene Dedicatory Sonnets and the Poetics of Misreading
The Complaints and 'The Man of Whom the Muse Is Scorned'
The Ruines of Time and the Rhetoric of Contestation
Retrospective Fiction-making and the 'secrete' of the 1591 Virgils Gnat
Mother Hubberds Tale and the Ambivalent Withdrawal from Power
After the Complaints
The Legacy of the Complaints and the Question of Slander
Afterword
Notes
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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