Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

After the Berlin Wall : Germany and beyond /
edited by Katharina Gerstenberger and Jana Evans Braziel.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
viii, 287 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0230111920 (hardback), 9780230111929 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230111920 (hardback)
9780230111929 (hardback)
contents note
After the Berlin Wall : realigned worlds, invisible lines, and incalculable remnants / Jana Braziel and Katharina Gerstenberger -- Sex and the city : thoughts on literature, gender, and normalization in the New Germany / Sander L. Gilman -- Exploring Master Keaton's Germany : a Japanese perspective on the end of the Cold War / Shannon Granville -- From the Berlin Wall to the West Bank barrier : how material objects and psychological theories can be used to construct individual and cultural traits / Christine Leuenberger -- The diminishing relevance of Ostalgie twenty years after reunification / Paul Kubicek -- Ending Cold War divisions and establishing new partnerships : German unification and the transformation of German-Polish relations / Jonathan Murphy -- The fall of the Berlin Wall : the counterrevolution in Soviet foreign policy and the end of communism / Robert Snyder and Tim White -- "Seventh of November" from Berliner Ensemble / Douglas Cowie -- Specters of work : literature and labor in post-socialist Germany / Hunter Bivens -- The end of an event / Benjamin Robinson -- Building consensus : painting and the enlightenment tradition in post-Wall Germany / Anna Dempsey -- Berlin's history in context : the foreign ministry and the Spreebogen-Complex in the context of the architectural debates / Carol Anne Costabile-Heming -- Berlin Mitte and the anxious disavowal of Beijing modernism : architectural polemics within globalization / Daniel Purdy.
abstract
"Twenty years after its fall, the wall that divided Berlin and Germany presents a conceptual paradox: on one hand, Germans have sought to erase it completely; on the other, it haunts the imagination in complex and often surprising ways. Similarly, Cold War divisions resonate in the global image of the "New Germany." Several overlapping themes run through the essays: the exportation of German post-wall debates into other cultural contexts and representations of the Wall within non-German settings; the emergence of visual, literary, and psychological imagery derived from the Berlin Wall well beyond its existence; the importance of space, geographical, political, as well as imagined, in the aftermath of the Wall; and the continued artistic as well as socio-historical engagement with East Germany as a state that no longer exists but whose memory reverberates in sometimes unexpected ways not only today but as a projection into the future. "--
catalogue key
8208515
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Katharina Gerstenberger is a professor of German and head of the Department of German Studies at the University of Cincinnati She is the author of Truth to Tell German Women's Autobiographies and Turn-of-the-Century Culture [2OOO) and Writing the New Berlin The German Capital in Post-Wall literature (2008) She has published widely on post-war and contemporary German-language authors Her work has appeared in Monatshefte, Women in German Yearbook, German Quarterly, Gegenwartsliteratur and several anthologies, including German Literature in the Age of Globalization (2004), Spatial turns Space, "place, and Mobility in German Literary and Visual Culture (2010),and Generational shifts in Contemporary German Culture (2010) Together with Patricia Herminghouse she credited German Literature in a New Century Trends, Traditions, Transformations, Transitions (2008)"'she also, served as coeditor of the Women in German Year book Jana Evans Braziel is a professor of English and Comparative Literature and an affiliate faculty member in Africana Studies and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Cincinnati Braziel's Schoarly and pedagogical interests are in American hemispheric literatures and cultures, Caribbean studies, Haitian studies and the intersections of diaspora, transnational activism,.and globalization Braziel is the author monographs Duvalier's Ghosts Race, Diaspora, and U.S Imperialism in Haitian literatures (2010), Caribbean Genesis Jamaica Kincaid and he Writing of New Words (2009), Artfsts, Performers, and Black Masculinity in the Haitian Diaspora {2008) and Diaspora An Introduction (2008) Braziel's works in progress include the books Entangled Gardens Genesis, Environmentalism, and Political Economy in Caribbean
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-08-01:
This collection joins a growing body of work dedicated to rethinking the history of German reunification 20 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall. In contrast to similar collections, e.g., Debating German Cultural Identity since 1989, ed. by Anne Fuchs, Kathleen James-Chakraborty, and Linda Shortt (CH, Apr'12, 49-4241), and Twenty Years On (2012), the strength of this book is how it looks beyond the borders of Germany to examine the aftermath of 1989 in a transnational context, reading the Berlin Wall itself as "truly a global phenomenon well beyond its fall." Emerging from a 2009 conference commemorating that event, the volume brings together contributions by established scholars from a range of fields. Though its interdisciplinary scope is welcome, the essays in the collection are uneven in style and focus, and they are not clearly organized into thematic sections, which might have resulted in a more unified presentation. Nonetheless, scholars of contemporary Germany will find compelling reading in chapters that make global connections to Japan, Israel, Poland, the Soviet Union, and China. And two of the best contributions, those by Hunter Bivens and Benjamin Robinson, stick closer to home to examine the legacy of Marxism in Germany today. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. H. D. Baer University of Oklahoma
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This cosmopolitan and interdisciplinary volume explores the resonance of 1989 in films, novels, architecture, and city planning, as well as in domestic and international politics. Braziel and Gerstenberger have collected an impressive set of original, stimulating, and sometimes provocative essays that trace the enduring significance of the fall of the wall, both in Germany and beyond. This is an important contribution to the growing literature on the end of the Cold War." - James J. Sheehan, Stanford University
"This cosmopolitan and interdisciplinary volume explores the resonance of 1989 in films, novels, architecture, and city planning, as well as in domestic and international politics. Braziel and Gerstenberger have collected an impressive set of original, stimulating, and sometimes provocative essays that trace the enduring significance of the fall of the wall, both in Germany and beyond. This is an important contribution to the growing literature on the end of the Cold War."--James J. Sheehan, Stanford University
"This cosmopolitan and interdisciplinary volume explores the resonance of 1989 in films, novels, architecture, and city planning, as well as in domestic and international politics. Braziel and Gerstenberger have collected an impressive set of original, stimulating, and sometimes provocative essays that trace the enduring significance of the fall of the wall, both in Germany and beyond. This is an important contribution to the growing literature on the end of the Cold War." - James J. Sheehan, Stanford University "The strength of this book is how it looks beyond the borders of Germany to examine the aftermath of 1989 in a transnational context, reading the Berlin Wall itself as 'truly a global phenomenon well beyond its fall.' . . . Recommended."'" CHOICE
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This collection of essays examines the conceptual paradox that is the Berlin Wall
Library of Congress Summary
"Twenty years after its fall, the wall that divided Berlin and Germany presents a conceptual paradox: on one hand, Germans have sought to erase it completely; on the other, it haunts the imagination in complex and often surprising ways. Similarly, Cold War divisions resonate in the global image of the "New Germany." Several overlapping themes run through the essays: the exportation of German post-wall debates into other cultural contexts and representations of the Wall within non-German settings; the emergence of visual, literary, and psychological imagery derived from the Berlin Wall well beyond its existence; the importance of space, geographical, political, as well as imagined, in the aftermath of the Wall; and the continued artistic as well as socio-historical engagement with East Germany as a state that no longer exists but whose memory reverberates in sometimes unexpected ways not only today but as a projection into the future. "--
Main Description
After the Berlin Wall: Germany and Beyondexplores historical, cultural, political, and literary dimensions of the fall of the Berlin Wall and its aftermath both in Germany and internationally. Topics include German and Chinese approaches to urban planning and historical preservation, Japanese responses to German unification, discussions of walls and borders in Germany and in the West Bank, and contemporary German culture in a global world. Art historians, literary scholars, and sociologists offer perspectives on the continued importance of East German culture and the legacies of socialism. Drawing from interdisciplinary methods, the collection is of value to anthropologists, historians, political theorists, and cultural critics.
Main Description
After the Berlin Wall: Germany and Beyondexplores historical, cultural, political, and literary dimensions of the fall of the Berlin Wall and its aftermath both in Germany and internationally. Topics include German and Chinese approaches to urban planning and historical preservation, Japanese responses to German unification, walls and borders in Germany and the West Bank, and contemporary German culture in a global world. Art historians, literary scholars, and sociologists offer perspectives on the continued importance of East German culture and the legacies of socialism. Drawing from interdisciplinary methods, the collection is of value to anthropologists, historians, political theorists, and cultural critics.
Main Description
Twenty years after its fall, the wall that divided Berlin and Germany presents a conceptual paradox: on one hand, Germans have sought to erase it completely; on the other, it haunts the imagination in complex and often surprising ways. Similarly, Cold War divisions resonate in the global image of the "new Germany." Several overlapping themes run through the essays: the exportation of German post-wall debates into other cultural contexts and representations of the Wall within non-German settings; the emergence of visual, literary, and psychological imagery derived from the Berlin Wall well beyond its existence; the importance of space, geographical, political, as well as imagined, in the aftermath of the Wall; and the continued artistic as well as socio-historical engagement with East Germany as a state that no longer exists but whose memory reverberates in sometimes unexpected ways not only today but as a projection into the future.
Main Description
Twenty years after its fall, the wall that divided Berlin and Germany presents a conceptual paradox: on one hand, Germans have sought to erase it completely; on the other, it haunts the imagination in complex and often surprising ways. Similarly, Cold War divisions resonate in the global image of the “new Germany.” Several overlapping themes run through the essays: the exportation of German post-wall debates into other cultural contexts and representations of the Wall within non-German settings; the emergence of visual, literary, and psychological imagery derived from the Berlin Wall well beyond its existence; the importance of space, geographical, political, as well as imagined, in the aftermath of the Wall; and the continued artistic as well as socio-historical engagement with East Germany as a state that no longer exists but whose memory reverberates in sometimes unexpected ways not only today but as a projection into the future.
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Tablesp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: After the Berlin Wall: Realigned Worlds, Invisible Lines, and Incalculable Remnantsp. 1
Sex and the City: Thoughts on Literature, Gender, and Normalization in the New Germanyp. 19
Exploring Master Keaton's Germany: A Japanese Perspective on the End of the Cold Warp. 37
From the Berlin Wall to the West Bank Barrier: How Material Objects and Psychological Theories Can Be Usedto Construct Individual and Cultural Traitsp. 85
The Diminishing Relevance of Ostalgie 20 Years after Reunificationp. 105
Ending Cold War Divisions and Establishing New Partnerships: German Unification and the Transformation of German-Polish Relationsp. 105
The Fall of the Berlin Wall: The Counterrevolution in Soviet Foreign Policy and the End of Communismp. 127
"Seventh of November" from Berliner Ensemblep. 1149
Specters of Work: Literature and Labor in Postsocialist Germanyp. 157
The End of an Eventp. 179
Building Consensus: Painting and the EnlightenmentTradition in Post-Wall Germanyp. 201
Berlin's History in Context: The Foreign Ministry and the Spreebogen Complex in the Context of the Architectural Debatesp. 231
Berlin Mitte and the Anxious Disavowal of Beijing Modernism: Architectural Polemics within Globalizationp. 249
Notes on Contributorsp. 273
Indexp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem