Catalogue


Corporate dreams : big business in American democracy from the Great Depression to the great recession /
James Hoopes.
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2011.
description
ix, 234 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813551307 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780813551302 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2011.
isbn
0813551307 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780813551302 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
The corporate American dream at its height and in its origins -- The corporate American dream -- Corporate and national character -- From public purpose to private profit -- Corporations as enemies of the free market -- Corporate failure and government fix -- Corporate crashes -- Managers versus markets -- Corporations blow their chance to end the depression -- Roosevelt's confused anti-corporatism -- The corporation strikes back -- The right to manage -- Corporations recover their moral authority -- Killing the unions softly -- Creating Reagan and his voters -- What manner of man(ager)? -- Masking the arrogance of power -- Responsibility versus profit at general motors -- Critics of managerial character -- JFK's pyrrhic victory over U.S. steel -- The corporation in the wilderness again -- McNamara and the staffers -- The false confidence of the anti-corporatists -- Corporate America loses world supremacy -- Laying the groundwork for the corporation's cultural comeback -- Leadership -- Managing by values -- Creating the concept of corporate culture -- Inventing the leadership development industry -- Reagan aids corporations by bashing government -- Entrepreneurship -- Supply siders versus the big corporation -- Reengineering the corporation -- George W. Bush, Enron, and the great recession -- Can the corporate American dream be saved?.
catalogue key
8208398
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-04-01:
Throughout American history, there has been an intriguing tension between corporate authoritarian rule and the democratic ideals of the government. Hoopes (business ethics, Babson College) argues in this timely volume that despite prevailing anticorporatism, Americans have been in awe of corporations and have placed too much faith in their leadership. He examines the ebb and flow of illusions surrounding business management from the Great Depression to the great recession (and periodic anticorporate reactions, usually stemming from scandal), and seeks to reveal that the corporation is a moral paradox that improves prosperity by subjecting its workforce to overbearing authority. Hoopes's examination of seminal writings (e.g., C. Wright Mills, The White Collar) and business leaders (e.g., GM's Charles Wilson, Ford's Robert McNamara) shows how they significantly shaped public views. More recently the allure of entrepreneurship and small businesses generated during the technology boom has spawned a new anticorporate mentality, even though many corporations (IBM is noted) have become increasingly entrepreneurial. Hoopes argues that Americans must understand the usefulness of corporations while being wary of their power, and must maintain discerning suspicion of corporate power as they have been mindful of politicians. Excellent chapter on critics of managerial character. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers; students, upper-division undergraduate and up; faculty; professionals. R. M. Hyser James Madison University
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-08-01:
Hoopes (business ethics, Babson Coll.; Hail to the CEO: George W. Bush and the Failure of Moral Leadership) throws his hat into the crowded ring of books on the evils of corporate America. Others include Ted Nace's Gangs of America: The Rise of Corporate Power and the Disabling of Democracy, William D. Cohan's Money and Power: How Goldman Sachs Came To Rule the World, and Jeff Madrick's Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the -Present. Hoopes seeks to resurrect in Americans a "moderate anticorporatism" by tracing the history of corporate culture from the 1930s to the end of George W. Bush's presidency. He divides the book into seven parts that correspond to stages in the evolutionary time line of corporate culture, each of which includes four vignettes that describe a defining event or important personality that significantly impacted the stage. VERDICT A quick read with academic flavor, this title will appeal to fans of political and business history as well as those looking to better understand what led to America's latest recession.-Sara Holder, McGill Univ. Lib., Montreal (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In this expansive, engaging, and learned history of the ever-changing set of ideas and ideologies which have legitimated corporate power and profit in America, James Hoopes explores the presumptions, popular as well as academic, that have for so long sustained managerial authority and corporate prestige. Because Hoopes is a thoughtful ethicist, as well as an accomplished historian of business enterprise, his book has the kind of moral weight and political urgency that commend it to a very wide readership indeed."
"James Hoopes believes we need to understand the differences between valid 'entrepreneurial leadership in politics and government' and tired versions of corporate fluff. He argues that simplistic president-as-chief-executive-officer equations of politics and business are dangerous. This short book is informative."
"Throughout American history, there has been an intriguing tension between corporate authoritarian rule and the democratic ideals of the government. Hoopes argues in this timely volume that despite prevailing anticorporatism, Americans have been in awe of corporations and have placed too much faith in their leadership. He examines the ebb and flow of illusions surrounding business management from the Great Depression to the great recession and seeks to reveal that the corporation is a moral paradox that improves prosperity by subjecting its workforce to overbearing authority. Hoopes argues that Americans must understand the usefulness of corporations while being wary of their power, and must maintain discerning suspicion of corporate power as they have been mindful of politicians. Excellent chapter on critics of managerial character. Recommended."
"Hoopes throws his hat into the ring of books on the evils of corporate America. Hoopes seeks to resurrect in Americans a ''moderate anticorporatism'' by tracing the history of corporate culture from the 1930s to the end of George W. Bush’s presidency. He divides the book into seven parts that correspond to stages in the evolutionary time line of corporate culture, each of which includes four vignettes that describe a defining event or important personality that significantly impacted the stage. A quick read with academic flavor, this title will appeal to fans of political and business history as well as those looking to better understand what led to America’s latest recession."
"Hoopes throws his hat into the ring of books on the evils of corporate America. Hoopes seeks to resurrect in Americans a ''moderate anticorporatism'' by tracing the history of corporate culture from the 1930s to the end of George W. Bush's presidency. He divides the book into seven parts that correspond to stages in the evolutionary time line of corporate culture, each of which includes four vignettes that describe a defining event or important personality that significantly impacted the stage. A quick read with academic flavor, this title will appeal to fans of political and business history as well as those looking to better understand what led to America's latest recession."
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, August 2011
Booklist, November 2011
Choice, April 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Public trust in corporations plummeted in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, when “Lehman Brothers” and “General Motors” became dirty words for many Americans. In Corporate Dreams, James Hoopes argues that Americans still place too much faith in corporations and, especially, in the idea of “values-based leadership” favored by most CEOs. The danger of corporations, he suggests, lies not just in their economic power, but also in how their confused and undemocratic values are infecting Americans’ visions of good governance. Corporate Dreamsproposes that Americans need to radically rethink their relationships with big business and the government. Rather than buying into the corporate notion of “values-based leadership,” we should view corporate leaders with the same healthy suspicion that our democratic political tradition teaches us to view our political leaders. Unfortunately, the trend is moving the other way. Corporate notions of leadership are invading our democratic political culture when it should be the reverse. To diagnose the cause and find a cure for our toxic attachment to corporate models of leadership, Hoopes goes back to the root of the problem, offering a comprehensive history of corporate culture inAmerica, from the Great Depression to today’s Great Recession. Combining a historian’s careful eye with an insider’s perspective on the business world, this provocative volume tracks changes in government economic policy, changes in public attitudes toward big business, and changes in how corporate executives view themselves. Whether examining the rise of Leadership Development programs or recounting JFK’s Pyrrhic victory over U.S. Steel, Hoopes tells a compelling story of how America lost its way, ceding authority to the policies and values of corporate culture. But he also shows us how it’s not too late to return to our democratic ideals-and that it’s not too late to restore the American dream.
Main Description
Public trust in corporations plummeted in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, when "Lehman Brothers" and "General Motors" became dirty words for many Americans. In Corporate Dreams, James Hoopes argues that Americans still place too much faith in corporations and, especially, in the idea of "values-based leadership" favored by most CEOs. The danger of corporations, he suggests, lies not just in their economic power, but also in how their confused and undemocratic values are infecting Americans' visions of good governance. Corporate Dreamsproposes that Americans need to radically rethink their relationships with big business and the government. Rather than buying into the corporate notion of "values-based leadership," we should view corporate leaders with the same healthy suspicion that our democratic political tradition teaches us to view our political leaders. Unfortunately, the trend is moving the other way. Corporate notions of leadership are invading our democratic political culture when it should be the reverse. To diagnose the cause and find a cure for our toxic attachment to corporate models of leadership, Hoopes goes back to the root of the problem, offering a comprehensive history of corporate culture inAmerica, from the Great Depression to today's Great Recession. Combining a historian's careful eye with an insider's perspective on the business world, this provocative volume tracks changes in government economic policy, changes in public attitudes toward big business, and changes in how corporate executives view themselves. Whether examining the rise of Leadership Development programs or recounting JFK's Pyrrhic victory over U.S. Steel, Hoopes tells a compelling story of how America lost its way, ceding authority to the policies and values of corporate culture. But he also shows us how it's not too late to return to our democratic ideals-and that it's not too late to restore the American dream.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
The Corporate American Dream at Its Height and in Its Origins
The Corporate American Dreamp. 9
Corporate and National Characterp. 15
From Public Purpose to Private Profitp. 22
Corporations as Enemies of the Free Marketp. 27
Corporate Failure and Government Fix
Corporate Crashesp. 35
Managers versus Marketsp. 40
Corporations Blow Their Chance to End the Depressionp. 45
Roosevelt's Confused Anticorporatismp. 51
The Corporation Strikes Back
The Right to Managep. 61
Corporations Recover Their Moral Authorityp. 67
Killing the Unions Softlyp. 72
Creating Reagan and His Votersp. 76
What Manner of Man(ager)?
Masking the Arrogance of Powerp. 87
Responsibility versus Profit at General Motorsp. 93
Critics of Managerial Characterp. 100
JFK's Pyrrhic Victory over U.S. Steelp. 106
The Corporation in the Wilderness Again
McNamara and the Staffersp. 115
The False Confidence of the Anticorporatistsp. 122
Corporate America Loses World Supremacyp. 130
Laying the Groundwork for the Corporation's Cultural Comebackp. 137
Leadership
Managing by Valuesp. 145
Creating the Concept of Corporate Culturep. 152
Inventing the Leadership Development Industryp. 156
Reagan Aids Corporations by Bashing Governmentp. 163
Entrepreneurship
Supply-Siders versus the Big Corporationp. 173
Reengineering the Corporationp. 180
George W. Bush, Enron, and the Great Recessionp. 189
Can the Corporate American Dream Be Saved!p. 198
Notesp. 209
Indexp. 219
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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