Catalogue

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War and state building in the Middle East /
Rolf Schwarz.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2012.
description
xiv, 155 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813037921 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9780813037929 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2012.
isbn
0813037921 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9780813037929 (hbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction -- Understanding state making -- Iraq: from rentier state to failed state -- Jordan: rentierism and state survival -- The gulf states: from tribal sheikhdoms to sustainable states -- State failure and peace building.
catalogue key
8208197
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [131]-148) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Rolf Schwarz is professor at the NATO Defense College in Rome.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-08-01:
Challenging Charles Tilly's model of "war-makes-state," Schwarz (NATO Defense College, Rome) compares the Middle East with the European experience of state building and explains the dynamics and consolidation of states in the Arab world through an examination of Iraq, Jordan, and the United Arab Emirates. Although states follow different paths to state making, in the Middle East (unlike in Europe) wars did not make states; wars destroyed them instead. This could be explained by the fact that while the state-creating wars in Europe were largely territorial, in the Middle East it is the regime, and not territory, that is up for grabs. In the Arab Middle East, state making was achieved via the extension of a combination of social contract, economic resources, and material benefits such as jobs, free education, and subsidized food to citizens in exchange for political loyalty. If the "war-makes-state" theory were accurate, then the United Arab Emirates and Jordan, according to Schwarz, would probably have been incorporated through force by larger neighboring states, and Iraq would have fallen apart before the 2003 US invasion. On the contrary, these countries prospered due to the combination of rentierism, social contracts, and in some states oil revenue. Summing Up: Recommended. All readership levels. K. M. Zaarour Shaw University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2012
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
"This comparative volume explores the dramatic pathways of political development undertaken by rentier regimes in the Arab world. Here, waging war proved to weaken rather than strengthen state capacity in pernicious ways-an insight that contrasts sharply with received Western wisdom about war being the crucible of modern state building."-Sean L. Yom, Temple University "An important contribution to the literature on state building in the Middle East."-Gawdat Bahgat, author of Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons in the Middle East War and State Building in the Middle Eastaddresses the strengths and weaknesses of the authoritarian-regime governments commonly found in the Middle East, particularly among oil-rich countries. In this region, war has interacted with processes of state making in ways that fundamentally differ from the European experience. In short, unlike in Europe, wars do not make states in the Middle East; they destroy them. According to economic theory, most oil-rich countries are rentier states; that is, they rely upon the extraction of a natural resource to generate revenue and authority for the central government. As a result, there is little reliance upon domestic taxation and a general lack of political accountability and transparency. By examining how such governments wage war, Rolf Schwarz turns the prevailing wisdom of modern state building on its head. He closely analyzes the real-world experiences of the United Arab Emirates, Jordan, and Iraq to show how rentierism leads to internal weaknesses when it comes to governing. His comparative approach allows him to demonstrate how varying levels of reliance upon external resource rents are reflected in the structure of the regime. By highlighting the perils of funding wars through the sale of natural resources, fighting with imported weaponry, and accepting peace settlements negotiated and guaranteed by foreign powers, Schwarz offers provocative insights into post-conflict peace building, state failure, and the potential for democratic rule in the region. Rolf Schwarzis professor at the NATO Defense College in Rome. A volume in the series Governance and International Relations in the Middle East, edited by Mohsen M. Milani
Description for Bookstore
“This comparative volume explores the dramatic pathways of political development undertaken by rentier regimes in the Arab world. Here, waging war proved to weaken rather than strengthen state capacity in pernicious ways-an insight that contrasts sharply with received Western wisdom about war being the crucible of modern state building.”-Sean L. Yom, Temple University “An important contribution to the literature on state building in the Middle East.”-Gawdat Bahgat, author of Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons in the Middle East War and State Building in the Middle Eastaddresses the strengths and weaknesses of the authoritarian-regime governments commonly found in the Middle East, particularly among oil-rich countries. In this region, war has interacted with processes of state making in ways that fundamentally differ from the European experience. In short, unlike in Europe, wars do not make states in the Middle East; they destroy them. According to economic theory, most oil-rich countries are rentier states; that is, they rely upon the extraction of a natural resource to generate revenue and authority for the central government. As a result, there is little reliance upon domestic taxation and a general lack of political accountability and transparency. By examining how such governments wage war, Rolf Schwarz turns the prevailing wisdom of modern state building on its head. He closely analyzes the real-world experiences of the United Arab Emirates, Jordan, and Iraq to show how rentierism leads to internal weaknesses when it comes to governing. His comparative approach allows him to demonstrate how varying levels of reliance upon external resource rents are reflected in the structure of the regime. By highlighting the perils of funding wars through the sale of natural resources, fighting with imported weaponry, and accepting peace settlements negotiated and guaranteed by foreign powers, Schwarz offers provocative insights into post-conflict peace building, state failure, and the potential for democratic rule in the region. Rolf Schwarzis professor at the NATO Defense College in Rome. A volume in the series Governance and International Relations in the Middle East, edited by Mohsen M. Milani
Main Description
War and State Building in the Middle East addresses the strengths and weaknesses of the authoritarian-regime governments commonly found in the Middle East, particularly among oil-rich countries. In this region, war has interacted with processes of state making in ways that fundamentally differ from the European experience. In short, unlike in Europe, wars do not make states in the Middle East; they destroy them.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Understanding State Makingp. 15
Iraq: From Rentier State to Failed Statep. 31
Jordan: Rentierism and State Survivalp. 58
The Gulf States: From Tribal Sheikhdoms to Sustainable Statesp. 75
State Failure and Peace Buildingp. 100
Epiloguep. 117
Notesp. 121
Bibliographyp. 131
Indexp. 149
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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