Catalogue


Handbook of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging [electronic resource] : from single molecules to ensembles /
Markus Sauer, Johan Hofkens, and Jörg Enderlein.
imprint
Weinheim : Wiley-VCH, c2011.
description
ix, 281 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
ISBN
3527316698 (alk. paper), 9783527316694 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Weinheim : Wiley-VCH, c2011.
isbn
3527316698 (alk. paper)
9783527316694 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Basic principles of fluorescence spectroscopy -- Fluorophores and fluorescent labels -- Fluorophore labeling for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMFS) -- Fluorophore selection for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMFS) and photobleaching pathways -- Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy -- Excited state energy transfer -- Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) reactions -- Super-resolution fluorescence imaging -- Single-molecule enzymatics.
catalogue key
8203159
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Markus Sauer studied chemistry in Karlsruhe, Saarbrcken, and Heidelberg, where he gained his PhD in physical chemistry in 1995. After a short-term visit to LBNL, Berkeley, in the group led by Professor Shimon Weiss, he was honored with the Bio-Future award in 1998 to perform independent research on single-molecule handling, detection, and identification. In 2002 he gained his lecturing qualification at the Institute of Physical Chemistry in Heidelberg, 2003 he has accepted a Professor position for Applied Laser Physics and Laser Spectroscopy at Bielefeld University, and since 2009 he is Professor for Biotechnology and Biophysics at Wrzburg University. Professor Sauer's research interests cover super-resolution imaging methods, the development of new electron transfer sensors and probes as well as new single molecule sensitive fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Johan Hofkens received his MSc. (1988) and Ph.D. degree (1993) in Chemistry from the University of Leuven (K.U.Leuven). After postdoctoral research with Prof. Masuhara at Osaka University and Prof. Barbara at the University of Minneapolis, he rejoined the K.U.Leuven supervising the Single Molecule Unit in the group of Prof. De Schryver. In 2005 he was appointed Research Professor at the K.U.Leuven and recently he was promoted to full professor. His research interests are fast spectroscopy, (single molecule) fluorescence microscopy and nanoscopy and the application of these techniques in material science and biosciences. Jrg Enderlein studied physics at Mechnikov University in Odessa, Ukraine, and received his PhD from Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany, in 1991. Thereafter, he worked at PicoQuant until 1996, when he joined the group under Richard A. Keller in Los Alamos, USA as a visiting scientist for one year, before becoming an assistant professor at the University of Regensburg, Germany. Since 2001 he had been a Heisenberg Fellow of the German Research Council (DFG) and established his research group at the Institute for Biological Information Processing 1 at the Forschungszentrum Jlich. After an appointment as professor for Biophysical Chemistry at Eberhard-Karls-University Tbingen, he became professor for biophysics at the Georg-August-University in Gttingen in 2007. Professor Enderlein's research focuses on the development of new single-molecule spectroscopic and imaging techniques for biophysics applications.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Therefore, this book represents a valuable source of information for both specialists in single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and researchers new to this branch of fluorescence techniques." (Anal Bioanal Chem, 12 February 2012)
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Providing much-needed information on fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy, this book covers techniques for the detection of single molecules, data registration, the use of such spectroscopic tools as energy transfer and electron transfer mechanisms, as well as new techniques for improving the resolution of optical microscopy below the resolution gap. Examples show how each technique can help in obtaining detailed and refined information from individual molecular systems. A basic chapter is included on useful fluorophores and their development.
Main Description
Providing much-needed information on fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy, this ready reference covers detection techniques, data registration, and the use of spectroscopic tools, as well as new techniques for improving the resolution of optical microscopy below the resolution gap. Starting with the basic principles, the book goes on to treat fluorophores and labeling, single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and enzymatics, as well as excited state energy transfer, and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. Examples show how each technique can help in obtaining detailed and refined information from individual molecular systems.
Back Cover Copy
J_rg Enderleins studied physics at the Mechnikov University in Odessa (Ukraine) from 1981 until 1986, and defended his PhD thesis about non-linear reaction diffusion system at Humboldt University in berlin (Germany) in 1991. From 1991 until 1996 he was scientific co-worker of PicoQuant GmbH, where he was involved in the development of advanced single-photon counting technology for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. From 1996 until 1997, he joined the group of Richard A. Keller in Los Alamos (USA) as a guest scientist, and in 1997 became an assistant professor at the University of Regensburg (Germany), where he defended his habilitation in 2000. From 2001 until 2006, he was as Heisenberg Fellow of the German Research Council (DFG) and established his research group at the Insitut for Biological Information processing 1 at the Forschungszentrum J8lich (Germany). His main research topic is the development of new single-molecule spectroscopic techniques for biophysics applications. Johan Hofkens, born in Hoogstraten, Belgium, in 1966 received his master in Chemistry from KUleuven in 1988, which was followed by a PhD in Sciences from KULeuven in 1993. After postdoctoral research with professor Masuahara at Osaka University and Professor Barbara at the University of Minneapolis, he rejoined the KULeuven were he was in charge of the single molecule unit in the group of Prof De Schryver. In 2005 he was appointed research professor at the KULeuven. His research interests are fast spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy and optics. Markus Sauer was born 1965 in Pforzheim. He studied chemistry in Karlsruhe, Saarbr8cken, and Heidelberg, and finished his PhD in Physical Chemistry at the University of Heidelberg in 1995 under the guidance of Prof. J8rgen Wolfrum. After a short-term visit at LBNL, Berkeley in the group of Prof. Shimon Weiss, he was decorated with the BioFuture award in 1998 to perform independent research on single-molecule handling, detection, and identification. 2002 he finished his habilitation in Heidelberg at the Institute of Physical Chemistry. Since 2003 he is Professor for Applied Laser Physics and Laser Spectroscopy at the University in Bielefeld. His research interests cover the development of new electron transfer sensors and probes as well as new single-molecule sensitive fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Kenneth Weston was born and grew up in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. After receiving a BS degree in Chemistry from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in 1994, he went on to earn a PhD in Chemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1998 where he worked with Prof. Steve Buratto. Kenneth spent two years working with Dr. Lori Goldner at The National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD as a National Research Council Postdoctoral Associate. In 2001, Kenneth joined to group of Dr. Markus Sauer at the Physical Chemistry Institute at the University of Heidelberg in Germany. From 2002-2005, Kenneth was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Florida State University. Kenneth's research has focused on the development of various new methods and applications of optical spectroscopy and microscopy, fluctuation correlation spectroscopy, and microfluidics. Kenneth is now a senior scientist with Directed Energy Solutions in Colorado Springs and is part of a team that is developing very high power infrared lasers.
Back Cover Copy
J'rg Enderleins studied physics at the Mechnikov University in Odessa (Ukraine) from 1981 until 1986, and defended his PhD thesis about non-linear reaction diffusion system at Humboldt University in berlin (Germany) in 1991. From 1991 until 1996 he was scientific co-worker of PicoQuant GmbH, where he was involved in the development of advanced single-photon counting technology for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. From 1996 until 1997, he joined the group of Richard A. Keller in Los Alamos (USA) as a guest scientist, and in 1997 became an assistant professor at the University of Regensburg (Germany), where he defended his habilitation in 2000. From 2001 until 2006, he was as Heisenberg Fellow of the German Research Council (DFG) and established his research group at the Insitut for Biological Information processing 1 at the Forschungszentrum J'lich (Germany). His main research topic is the development of new single-molecule spectroscopic techniques for biophysics applications. Johan Hofkens, born in Hoogstraten, Belgium, in 1966 received his master in Chemistry from KUleuven in 1988, which was followed by a PhD in Sciences from KULeuven in 1993. After postdoctoral research with professor Masuahara at Osaka University and Professor Barbara at the University of Minneapolis, he rejoined the KULeuven were he was in charge of the single molecule unit in the group of Prof De Schryver. In 2005 he was appointed research professor at the KULeuven. His research interests are fast spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy and optics. Markus Sauer was born 1965 in Pforzheim. He studied chemistry in Karlsruhe, Saarbr'cken, and Heidelberg, and finished his PhD in Physical Chemistry at the University of Heidelberg in 1995 under the guidance of Prof. J'rgen Wolfrum. After a short-term visit at LBNL, Berkeley in the group of Prof. Shimon Weiss, he was decorated with the BioFuture award in 1998 to perform independent research on single-molecule handling, detection, and identification. 2002 he finished his habilitation in Heidelberg at the Institute of Physical Chemistry. Since 2003 he is Professor for Applied Laser Physics and Laser Spectroscopy at the University in Bielefeld. His research interests cover the development of new electron transfer sensors and probes as well as new single-molecule sensitive fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Kenneth Weston was born and grew up in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. After receiving a BS degree in Chemistry from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in 1994, he went on to earn a PhD in Chemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1998 where he worked with Prof. Steve Buratto. Kenneth spent two years working with Dr. Lori Goldner at The National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD as a National Research Council Postdoctoral Associate. In 2001, Kenneth joined to group of Dr. Markus Sauer at the Physical Chemistry Institute at the University of Heidelberg in Germany. From 2002-2005, Kenneth was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Florida State University. Kenneth's research has focused on the development of various new methods and applications of optical spectroscopy and microscopy, fluctuation correlation spectroscopy, and microfluidics. Kenneth is now a senior scientist with Directed Energy Solutions in Colorado Springs and is part of a team that is developing very high power infrared lasers.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Traditional fluorescence methods are updated to fulfil current analysis needs in chemistry and life sciences. This is an introduction to the principles, covering such modern techniques as quantum dots, single molecule detection, nanoscopy and alternating laser excitation.
Back Cover Copy
Providing much-needed information on fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy, this ready reference covers detection techniques, data registration, and the use of spectroscopic tools, as well as new techniques for improving the resolution of optical microscopy below the resolution gap. Starting with the basic principles, the book goes on to treat fluorophores and labeling, single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and enzymatics, as well as excited state energy transfer, and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. Example show how each technique can help in obtaining detailed and refined information from individual molecular systems.
Long Description
Jörg Enderleins studied physics at the Mechnikov University in Odessa (Ukraine) from 1981 until 1986, and defended his PhD thesis about non-linear reaction diffusion system at Humboldt University in berlin (Germany) in 1991. From 1991 until 1996 he was scientific co-worker of PicoQuant GmbH, where he was involved in the development of advanced single-photon counting technology for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. From 1996 until 1997, he joined the group of Richard A. Keller in Los Alamos (USA) as a guest scientist, and in 1997 became an assistant professor at the University of Regensburg (Germany), where he defended his habilitation in 2000. From 2001 until 2006, he was as Heisenberg Fellow of the German Research Council (DFG) and established his research group at the Insitut for Biological Information processing 1 at the Forschungszentrum Jülich (Germany). His main research topic is the development of new single-molecule spectroscopic techniques for biophysics applications. Johan Hofkens, born in Hoogstraten, Belgium, in 1966 received his master in Chemistry from KUleuven in 1988, which was followed by a PhD in Sciences from KULeuven in 1993. After postdoctoral research with professor Masuahara at Osaka University and Professor Barbara at the University of Minneapolis, he rejoined the KULeuven were he was in charge of the single molecule unit in the group of Prof De Schryver. In 2005 he was appointed research professor at the KULeuven. His research interests are fast spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy and optics. Markus Sauer was born 1965 in Pforzheim. He studied chemistry in Karlsruhe, Saarbrücken, and Heidelberg, and finished his PhD in Physical Chemistry at the University of Heidelberg in 1995 under the guidance of Prof. Jürgen Wolfrum. After a short-term visit at LBNL, Berkeley in the group of Prof. Shimon Weiss, he was decorated with the BioFuture award in 1998 to perform independent research on single-molecule handling, detection, and identification. 2002 he finished his habilitation in Heidelberg at the Institute of Physical Chemistry. Since 2003 he is Professor for Applied Laser Physics and Laser Spectroscopy at the University in Bielefeld. His research interests cover the development of new electron transfer sensors and probes as well as new single-molecule sensitive fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Kenneth Weston was born and grew up in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. After receiving a BS degree in Chemistry from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in 1994, he went on to earn a PhD in Chemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1998 where he worked with Prof. Steve Buratto. Kenneth spent two years working with Dr. Lori Goldner at The National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD as a National Research Council Postdoctoral Associate. In 2001, Kenneth joined to group of Dr. Markus Sauer at the Physical Chemistry Institute at the University of Heidelberg in Germany. From 2002-2005, Kenneth was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Florida State University. Kenneth2s research has focused on the development of various new methods and applications of optical spectroscopy and microscopy, fluctuation correlation spectroscopy, and microfluidics. Kenneth is now a senior scientist with Directed Energy Solutions in Colorado Springs and is part of a team that is developing very high power infrared lasers.
Back Cover Copy
Jorg Enderleins studied physics at the Mechnikov University in Odessa (Ukraine) from 1981 until 1986, and defended his PhD thesis about non-linear reaction diffusion system at Humboldt University in berlin (Germany) in 1991. From 1991 until 1996 he was scientific co-worker of PicoQuant GmbH, where he was involved in the development of advanced single-photon counting technology for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. From 1996 until 1997, he joined the group of Richard A. Keller in Los Alamos (USA) as a guest scientist, and in 1997 became an assistant professor at the University of Regensburg (Germany), where he defended his habilitation in 2000. From 2001 until 2006, he was as Heisenberg Fellow of the German Research Council (DFG) and established his research group at the Insitut for Biological Information processing 1 at the Forschungszentrum Julich (Germany). His main research topic is the development of new single-molecule spectroscopic techniques for biophysics applications. Johan Hofkens, born in Hoogstraten, Belgium, in 1966 received his master in Chemistry from KUleuven in 1988, which was followed by a PhD in Sciences from KULeuven in 1993. After postdoctoral research with professor Masuahara at Osaka University and Professor Barbara at the University of Minneapolis, he rejoined the KULeuven were he was in charge of the single molecule unit in the group of Prof De Schryver. In 2005 he was appointed research professor at the KULeuven. His research interests are fast spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy and optics. Markus Sauer was born 1965 in Pforzheim. He studied chemistry in Karlsruhe, Saarbrucken, and Heidelberg, and finished his PhD in Physical Chemistry at the University of Heidelberg in 1995 under the guidance of Prof. Jurgen Wolfrum. After a short-term visit at LBNL, Berkeley in the group of Prof. Shimon Weiss, he was decorated with the BioFuture award in 1998 to perform independent research on single-molecule handling, detection, and identification. 2002 he finished his habilitation in Heidelberg at the Institute of Physical Chemistry. Since 2003 he is Professor for Applied Laser Physics and Laser Spectroscopy at the University in Bielefeld. His research interests cover the development of new electron transfer sensors and probes as well as new single-molecule sensitive fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Kenneth Weston was born and grew up in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. After receiving a BS degree in Chemistry from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in 1994, he went on to earn a PhD in Chemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1998 where he worked with Prof. Steve Buratto. Kenneth spent two years working with Dr. Lori Goldner at The National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD as a National Research Council Postdoctoral Associate. In 2001, Kenneth joined to group of Dr. Markus Sauer at the Physical Chemistry Institute at the University of Heidelberg in Germany. From 2002-2005, Kenneth was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Florida State University. Kenneth's research has focused on the development of various new methods and applications of optical spectroscopy and microscopy, fluctuation correlation spectroscopy, and microfluidics. Kenneth is now a senior scientist with Directed Energy Solutions in Colorado Springs and is part of a team that is developing very high power infrared lasers.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. IX
Basic Principles of Fluorescence Spectroscopyp. 1
Absorption and Emission of Lightp. 1
Spectroscopic Transition Strengthsp. 5
Lambert-Beer Law and Absorption Spectroscopyp. 7
Fluorophore Dimerization and Isosbestic Pointsp. 9
Franck-Condon Principlep. 12
Temperature Effects on Absorption and Emission Spectrap. 15
Fluorescence and Competing Processesp. 17
Stokes Shift, Solvent Relaxation, and Solvatochroismp. 20
Fluorescence Quantum Yield and Lifetimep. 22
Fluorescence Anisotropyp. 27
Referencesp. 29
Fluorophores and Fluorescent Labelsp. 31
Natural Fluorophoresp. 31
Organic Fluorophoresp. 35
Different Fluorophore Classesp. 38
Multichromophoric Labelsp. 49
Nanocrystalsp. 52
Referencesp. 56
Fluorophore Labeling for Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy (SMFS)p. 61
In Vitro Fluorescence Labelingp. 61
Fluorescence Labeling in Living Cellsp. 69
Referencesp. 80
Fluorophore Selection for Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy (SMFS) and Photobleaching Pathwaysp. 85
Referencesp. 91
Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopyp. 93
Introductionp. 93
Optical Set-Upp. 98
Data Acquisition and Evaluationp. 99
Milliseconds to Seconds: Diffusion and Concentrationp. 103
Single-Focus FCSp. 104
Dual-Focus FCSp. 111
Nanoseconds to Microseconds: Photophysics, Conformational Fluctuations, Binding Dynamicsp. 120
Picoseconds to Nanoseconds: Rotational Diffusion and Fluorescence Antibunchingp. 122
Antibunchingp. 122
Rotational Diffusionp. 125
Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopyp. 135
Conclusionp. 143
Referencesp. 143
Excited State Energy Transferp. 147
Introductionp. 147
Theory of (Förster) Energy Transferp. 148
Mechanism and Mathematical Formalism of FRETp. 148
Measuring FRET Efficiencies Through Excited-State Lifetimesp. 153
Spin Rules for FRETp. 154
Homo-FRET and FRET-Induced Depolarizationp. 154
Experimental Approach for Single-Pair FRET-Experimentsp. 157
Single-Laser Excitationp. 157
Alternating-Laser Excitation (ALEX)p. 160
Examples and Applications of FRETp. 161
FRET Processes in Bulk Experimentsp. 162
FRET-Based Molecular Biosensorsp. 162
Energy Hopping and Trapping in Chromophore-Substituted Polyphenylene Dendrimersp. 164
Single-Molecule Observation of FRETp. 168
Light-Harvesting Systems: Phycobilisomes and Allophycocyaninsp. 168
Hairpin Ribozyme Dynamics and Activityp. 179
Protein (Un)folding and Dynamicsp. 180
Referencesp. 183
Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET) Reactionsp. 189
Fluorescence Quenching by PETp. 189
Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy to Study PETp. 192
Single-Molecule Sensitive Fluorescence Sensors Based on PETp. 199
PET Reporter Systemp. 202
Monitoring Conformational Dynamics and Protein Folding by PETp. 205
Biological and Diagnostic Applicationsp. 209
Referencesp. 215
Super-Resolution Fluorescence Imagingp. 219
Diffraction Barrier of Optical Microscopyp. 219
Multi-Photon and Structured Illumination Microscopyp. 221
Stimulated Emission Depletionp. 223
Single-Molecule Based Photoswitching Microscopyp. 226
Background and Principles of Single-Molecule Based Photoswitching Microscopy Methodsp. 229
Temporal Resolution of Super-Resolution Imaging Methodsp. 236
Referencesp. 237
Single-Molecule Enzymaticsp. 241
Introduction: Why Study Enzymes on a Single-Molecule Level?p. 241
Biochemical Principles of Enzymatic Activity: the Michaelis-Menten Modelp. 242
ôLookingö at Individual Enzymesp. 243
Single-Enzyme Studies and Kineticsp. 244
Space-Resolved, but Time-Averaged Single Enzyme Assaysp. 244
Single-Turnover Experiments: Space and Time-Resolved Enzyme Assaysp. 248
Results: Revision of the Classical Michaelis-Menten Modelp. 255
Conformational Dynamicsp. 259
Single-Molecule DNA Sequencingp. 260
Shedding Light on Single-Enzyme Mechanismsp. 262
Movement of Molecular Motor Enzymes on Actin Filamentsp. 263
Lipase-Catalyzed Hydrolysis of Phospholipid Bilayersp. 264
Data Analysis of Fluorescence Intensity Time Traces of Single-Turnover Experimentsp. 264
Threshold Methodp. 264
Autocorrelation Analysisp. 267
Conclusionsp. 267
Referencesp. 268
Indexp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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