Catalogue


A journey to the western islands of Scotland /
James Boswell ; edited, with an introduction and notes, by Peter Levi.
imprint
Harmondsworth, Middlesex, England ; New York, N.Y., U.S.A. : Penguin, 1984.
description
429 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
ISBN
0140432213 (pbk.) :, 9780140432213 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Harmondsworth, Middlesex, England ; New York, N.Y., U.S.A. : Penguin, 1984.
isbn
0140432213 (pbk.) :
9780140432213 (pbk.)
catalogue key
8193934
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text contains Johnson's descriptions of the customs, religion, education, trade and agriculture of a society that was new to him. Boswell offers an intimate personal record of Johnson's behavior and conversation during the trip.
Main Description
Book by Samuel Johnson, published in 1775. The Journey was the result of a three-month trip to Scotland that Johnson took with James Boswell in 1773. It contains Johnson's descriptions of the customs, religion, education, trade, and agriculture of a society that was new to him. The account in Boswell's diary, published after Johnson's death as The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides, with Samuel Johnson, LL.D. (1785), offers an intimate personal record of Johnson's behavior and conversation during the trip.
Main Description
"I mentioned our design to Voltaire," wrote Boswell. "He looked at me as if I had talked of going to the North Pole ..." As it turned out, Johnson enjoyed their Scottish journey (although the land was not quite so wild and barbaric as perhaps he had hoped), and Boswell delighted in it. The year was 1773, they were sixty-three and thirty-two years old, and had been friends for ten years. Their journals, published together here, perfectly complement each other. Johnson's majestic prose and hawk eye for curious detail take in everything from the stone arrowheads found in the Hebrides, to the 'medicinal' waters of Loch Ness and 'the mischiefs of emigration'. Meanwhile, it is very lucky that as Johnson was observing Scotland, Boswell was observing Johnson. His record is perceptive, highly entertaining and full of sardonic wit; for him, as for us, it is an appetizer for The Life of Johnson .

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