Catalogue


New world faiths [electronic resource] : religion in colonial America /
Jon Butler.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.
description
xi, 183 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0195333101 (alk. paper), 9780195333107 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.
isbn
0195333101 (alk. paper)
9780195333107 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Worlds old and new -- Religion and missions in New Spain and New France -- Religion in England's first colonies -- The flowering of religious diversity -- African and American Indian religion -- Reviving colonial religion -- Religion and the American Revolution.
catalogue key
8189049
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 159-166) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A thorough yet succinct account of the rise of religious pluralism amidst the birth of a new nation.... Establishes a valuable foundation to examine the religious roots of the 13 original colonies."--Today's Librarian
"A thorough yet succinct account of the rise of religious pluralism amidst the birth of a new nation.... Establishes a valuable foundation to examine the religious roots of the 13 original colonies."--Today's Librarian "There is a tendency in secondary American history textbooks to paint religion in colonial America as a type of grey, monolithic, uniformity. As Jon Butler so clearly and succinctly in his "Religion in Colonial America" informs us, nothing could be further from the truth.... As current American society becomes more religiously diverse, Jon Butler's "Religion in Colonial America" is an important reminder that as a people, we have always been religiously diverse."--Religious Studies in Secondary Schools
"There is a tendency in secondary American history textbooks to paint religion in colonial America as a type of grey, monolithic, uniformity. As Jon Butler so clearly and succinctly in his "Religion in Colonial America" informs us, nothing could be further from the truth....As current Americansociety becomes more religiously diverse, Jon Butler's "Religion in Colonial America" is an important reminder that as a people, we have always been religiously diverse."--Religious Studies in Secondary Schools
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Jon Butler begins by describing the state of religious affairs in both the Old and New Worlds on the eve of colonization and traces the progress of religion in the colonies through the time of the American Revolution. He covers Protestants, Catholics and Jews, as well as the Native American religious experiences.
Main Description
Many people believe that the piety of the Pilgrims typified early American religion. However, by the 1730s Catholics, Jews, and Africans had joined Native Americans, Puritans, and numerous other Protestants in the colonies. Jon Butler launches his narrative with a description of the state of religious affairs in both the Old and New Worlds. He explores the failure of John Winthrop's goal to achieve Puritan perfection, the controversy over Anne Hutchinson's tenacious faith, the evangelizing stamina of ex-slave and Methodist preacher Absalom Jones, and the spiritual resilience of the Catawba Indians. The meeting of these diverse groups and their varied use of music, dance, and ritual produced an unprecedented evolution of religious practice, including the birth of revivals. And through their daily interactions, these Americans created a living foundation for the First Amendment. After Independence their active diversity of faiths led Americans to the groundbreaking idea that government should abandon the use of law to support any religious group and should instead guarantee free exercise of religion for everyone.
Main Description
Many people believe that the piety of the Pilgrims typified early American religion. However, by the 1730s Catholics, Jews, and Africans had joined Native Americans, Puritans, and numerous other Protestants in the colonies. Jon Butler launches his narrative with a description of the state ofreligious affairs in both the Old and New Worlds. He explores the failure of John Winthrop's goal to achieve Puritan perfection, the controversy over Anne Hutchinson's tenacious faith, the evangelizing stamina of ex-slave and Methodist preacher Absalom Jones, and the spiritual resilience of theCatawba Indians. The meeting of these diverse groups and their varied use of music, dance, and ritual produced an unprecedented evolution of religious practice, including the birth of revivals. And through their daily interactions, these Americans created a living foundation for the First Amendment.After Independence their active diversity of faiths led Americans to the groundbreaking idea that government should abandon the use of law to support any religious group and should instead guarantee free exercise of religion for everyone.

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