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Wealth and welfare [electronic resource] : an economic and social history of Britain, 1851-1951 /
Martin Daunton.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
description
xv, 656 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0198732090 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780198732099 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
isbn
0198732090 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780198732099 (pbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
The nation's wealth and the people's welfare -- Agriculture and the land -- Industry and the urban economy -- The service economy -- The growth of the British economy -- Free trade and protectionism -- Capital exports -- The rise and demise of the gold standard -- Rebuilding the international economic order? -- Births and marriages -- Deaths and disease -- Rich and poor -- Cultures of consumption -- Taxing and spending -- Education -- From the poor law to the welfare state -- Managing the economy -- The festival of Britain and British identity.
catalogue key
8185264
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Martin Daunton is Professor of Economic History at the University of Cambridge and Master of Trinity Hall. He is currently President of the Royal Historical Society.
Reviews
Review Quotes
a highly significant contribution to the discipline of economic and social history and goes far beyond what is conventionally understood as a textbook ... it is an object lesson in balanced judgement and incisive analysis.
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Martin Daunton examines the continuities and changes that occurred in the social and economic history of Britain, from the Great Exhibition of 1851 to the Festival of Britain in 1951. He also streses modernity and the growth of new patterns of consumption in areas such as the service sector and the leisure industry.
Long Description
This collection of essays explores the questions of what counted as knowledge in Victorian Britain, who defined knowledge and the knowledgeable, by what means and by what criteria. During the Victorian period, the structure of knowledge took on a new and recognizably modern form, and the disciplines that we now take for granted took shape. The ways in which knowledge was tested also took on a new form, with oral examinations and personal contacts giving way to formal written tests. New institutions of knowledge were created: museums were important at the start of the period (knowledge often meant classifying and collecting); by the end, universities had taken on a new prominence. Knowledge exploded and Victorians needed to make sense of the sheer scale of information, to popularize it, and at the same time to exclude ignorance and error - a role carried out by encyclopaedias and popular publications. The concept of knowledge is complex and much debated, with a multiplicity of meanings and troubling relationships. By studying the Victorian organization of knowledge in its institutional, social, and intellectual settings, these essays contribute to our consideration of these wider issues.
Main Description
Martin Daunton provides a clear and balanced view of the continuities and changes that occurred in the economic history of Britain from the Great Exhibition of 1851 to the Festival of Britain in 1951. In 1851, Britain was the dominant economic power in an increasingly global economy. The First World War marked a turning point, as globalisation went into reverse and Britain shifted to 'insular capitalism'. Rather than emphasising the decline of the British economy, this book stresses modernity and the growth of new patterns of consumption in areas such as the service sector and the leisure industry.Contents:1. IntroductionPart 1The Anatomy of the British Economy2. Aristocrats, Agriculture and the Land3. Industrialists and the Urban Economy4. The Service Economy5. The Growth of the British EconomyPart 2Globalization and Deglobalization6. Free Trade and Protectionism7. Capital Exports8. The Rise and Demise of the Gold Standard9. Rebuilding the International Economic Order?Part 3Poverty, Prosperity and Population10. Births and Marriages11. Deaths and Disease12. Rich and Poor13. Cultures of ConsumptionPart 4Public Policy and the State14. Taxing and Spending15. Education16. From the Poor Law to the Liberal Social Reforms17. War, Reconstruction and Depression18. Building a New JerusalemIndex
Main Description
Martin Daunton provides a clear and balanced view of the continuities and changes that occurred in the economic history of Britain from the Great Exhibition of 1851 to the Festival of Britain in 1951. In 1851, Britain was the dominant economic power in an increasingly global economy. The First World War marked a turning point, as globalisation went into reverse and Britain shifted to 'insular capitalism'. Rather than emphasizing the decline of the British economy, this book stresses modernity and the growth of new patterns of consumption in areas such as the service sector and the leisure industry.
Main Description
This collection of essays explores the questions of what counted as knowledge in Victorian Britain, who defined knowledge and the knowledgeable, by what means and by what criteria. During the Victorian period, the structure of knowledge took on a new and recognizably modern form, and the disciplines that we now take for granted took shape. The ways in which knowledge was tested also took on a new form, with oral examinations and personal contacts giving way to formal written tests. New institutions of knowledge were created: museums were important at the start of the period (knowledge often meant classifying and collecting); by the end, universities had taken on a new promince. Knowledge expanded and Victorians needed to make sense of the sheer scale of information, to popularize it, and at the same time to exclude ignorance and error - a role carried out by encyclopedias and popular publications. The concept of knowledge is complex and much debated, with a multiplicity of meanings and troubling relationships. By studying the Victorian organization of knowledge in its institutional settings, these essays contribute to our consideration of these wider issues.
Main Description
Wealth and Welfare analyses British economic and social history from the Great Exhibition of 1851 through to the Festival of Britain in 1951. The book takes a thematic approach to the subject. Part one focuses on the anatomy of the economy, including overviews of agriculture and the land, the industrial and urban economy, and the rise of the service economy. Part two charts the growth of economic globalization in the period up to the First World War and the retreat to 'insular capitalism' thereafter. The following section addresses the questions of poverty, prosperity, and population, looking at births and marriages, deaths and disease, the relationship between rich and poor, and the changing cultures of consumption over the century. The final part then deals with public policy and the state-charting the changes in taxation and spending policies, in education and welfare, and in attitudes to the role of the state in economic management over the century. Throughout, Daunton stresses that the story of Britain's economy in this period should not be seen simply as one of decline, but of redirection from international to domestic markets. As he makes clear, by the end of the period, Britain's economy was both modern and efficient, with the Festival of Britain in 1951 expressing the vision of a forward-looking, confident, social-democratic nation. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. xi
List of Tablesp. xii
Acknowledgementsp. xvi
The Nation's Wealth and the People's Welfarep. 1
The Anatomy of the British Economyp. 29
Agriculture and the Landp. 31
Industry and the Urban Economyp. 76
The Service Economyp. 131
The Growth of the British Economyp. 166
Globalization and Deglobalizationp. 199
Free Trade and Protectionismp. 201
Capital Exportsp. 244
The Rise and Demise of the Gold Standardp. 274
Rebuilding the International Economic Order?p. 298
Poverty, Prosperity, and Populationp. 321
Births and Marriagesp. 323
Death and Diseasep. 349
Rich and Poorp. 376
Cultures of Consumptionp. 419
Public Policy and the Statep. 457
Taxing and Spendingp. 459
Educationp. 488
From the Poor Law to the Welfare Statep. 521
Managing the Economyp. 574
The Festival of Britain and British Identityp. 608
Indexp. 621
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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