Catalogue


Ṣūfī commentaries on the Qurʼān in classical Islam [electronic resource] /
Kristin Zahra Sands.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2006.
description
viii, 196 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0415366852 (hardback), 9780415366854 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
title subject
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2006.
isbn
0415366852 (hardback)
9780415366854 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8181207
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 177-185) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'This book will serve as an excellent introduction to this genre ... the author deserves congratulations on her great effort.'- The Muslim World Book Review Kristin Zahra Sands "Sufi Commentaries on the Qur "an in Classical Islam is certainly one of these meaningful studies. On account of its clarity, exemplary textual fidelity and sound translations from the Arabic and Persian, this monograph will serve as an effective basis for further inquiries into Sufi Qur "anic exegesis. It is, therefore, a welcome contribution to the growing literature on Islamic mysticism. - Mohammed Rustom, University of Toronto 'Teachers of Islamic studies in theWest will surely welcome the publication of this valuable introduction to the principles and the practice of Sufi commentary on the Qur8:n. The book is well structured, written with clarity and simplicity, and the examples of exegesis presented are illustrative and illuminating. It renders this complex subject accessible to non-specialists and students of Islamic studies, while also providing some interesting insights for those who are already acquainted to some degree with Sufi exegesis'- Reza Shah-Kazemi, Institute of Ismaili Studies, London, Journal of Islamic Studies 2009
'This book will serve as an excellent introduction to this genre ... the author deserves congratulations on her great effort.'- The Muslim World Book Review Kristin Zahra Sands'Sufi Commentaries on the Qur'an in Classical Islam is certainly one of these meaningful studies. On account of its clarity, exemplary textual fidelity and sound translations from the Arabic and Persian, this monograph will serve as an effective basis for further inquiries into Sufi Qur'anic exegesis. It is, therefore, a welcome contribution to the growing literature on Islamic mysticism. - Mohammed Rustom, University of Toronto 'Teachers of Islamic studies in theWest will surely welcome the publication of this valuable introduction to the principles and the practice of Sufi commentary on the Qur8:n. The book is well structured, written with clarity and simplicity, and the examples of exegesis presented are illustrative and illuminating. It renders this complex subject accessible to non-specialists and students of Islamic studies, while also providing some interesting insights for those who are already acquainted to some degree with Sufi exegesis'- Reza Shah-Kazemi, Institute of Ismaili Studies, London, Journal of Islamic Studies 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
Meeting the ever increasing interest in Islam and Sufism, this book is the first comprehensive study of Sufi Qur'anic commentaries and includes translations of many writings previously unavailable in English. It examines the shared hermeneutical assumptions of Sufi writers and the diversity in style of Sufi commentaries. Some of the assumptions analyzed are: * the Qur'an is a multi-layered and ambiguous text open to endless interpretation * the knowledge of deeper meanings of the Qur'an is attainable by means other than transmitted interpretations and rational thought * the self is dynamic, moving through states and stations which result in different interpretations at different times. The styles of Sufi commentaries are explored, which range from philosophical musings to popular preaching to literary narrative and poetry. Other commentaries from the classical period are also investigated to provide context in understanding Sufi approaches and exegetical styles.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Containing newly translated writings, this unequalled study of the Sufi Qur'anic commentaries examines their hermeneutical assumptions and views on text, knowledge and interpretation as well as the variety of styles found within their commentaries.
Main Description
Meeting the ever increasing interest in Islam and Sufism, this book is the first comprehensive study of Sufi Qur "anic commentaries and includes translations of many writings previously unavailable in English. It examines the shared hermeneutical assumptions of Sufi writers and the diversity in style of Sufi commentaries. Some of the assumptions analyzed are: * the Qur "an is a multi-layered and ambiguous text open to endless interpretation * the knowledge of deeper meanings of the Qur "an is attainable by means other than transmitted interpretations and rational thought * the self is dynamic, moving through states and stations which result in different interpretations at different times. The styles of Sufi commentaries are explored, which range from philosophical musings to popular preaching to literary narrative and poetry. Other commentaries from the classical period are also investigated to provide context in understanding Sufi approaches and exegetical styles.
Back Cover Copy
Meeting the ever increasing interest in Islam and Sufism, this book is the first comprehensive study of Sufi Qur'anic commentaries and includes translations of many writings previously unavailable in English. It examines the shared hermeneutical assumptions of Sufi writers and the diversity in style of Sufi commentaries. Some of the assumptions analyzed are:* the Qur'an is a multi-layered and ambiguous text open to endless interpretation* the knowledge of deeper meanings of the Qur'an is attainable by means other than transmitted interpretations and rational thought* the self is dynamic, moving through states and stations which result in different interpretations at different times.The styles of Sufi commentaries are explored, which range from philosophical musings to popular preaching to literary narrative and poetry. Other commentaries from the classical period are also investigated to provide context in understanding Sufi approaches and exegetical styles.
Table of Contents
The Qur'an as the ocean of all knowledgep. 7
The Qur'anic text and ambiguity : verse 3:7p. 14
Uncovering meaning : knowledge and spiritual practicep. 29
Methods of interpretationp. 35
Attacking and defending Sufi Qur'anic interpretationp. 47
Sufi commentators on the Qur'anp. 67
Qur'anic verses 18:60-82 : the story of Musa and al-Khadirp. 79
Qur'anic verses on Maryamp. 97
Qur'an 24:35 (the light verse)p. 110
Commentators on the Qur'an
Al-Tabarip. 140
Al-Zamakhshaip. 141
Fakhr al-Din al-Razip. 141
Al-Qurtubip. 142
Ibn Taymiyyap. 143
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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