Catalogue


Communism /
Mark Sandle.
imprint
Harlow, England ; New York : Longman, 2012.
description
xxxviii, 184 p. : ill. (some col.)
ISBN
1408264501 (pbk.), 9781408264508 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
series title
imprint
Harlow, England ; New York : Longman, 2012.
isbn
1408264501 (pbk.)
9781408264508 (pbk.)
catalogue key
8178711
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [176]-180) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mark Sandle is Professor of History at the King's University College in Edmonton, Alberta. He previously worked in the UK. He has published and written widely on Russian and Soviet history including Gorbachev (2008) and A Short History of Soviet Socialism (1999).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-08-01:
Although communism did not turn out to be the tsunami that was promised or feared (the specter haunting the world), it is perhaps still too early to celebrate its ultimate funeral and speak of it in past tense. Communism was always more than its earthly embodiment and Marxism more than a political idea. Unlike any other ideology, it has deep roots in humanity's dreams, philosophies, and religions. Communism in its spiritual aspect is indelible. This book, intended as a supplementary reader in political science courses, mostly concentrates on the earthly communisms, those political entities that only putatively used the red flag to mask their coercive systems. Its major emphasis, as it should be, is on the Soviet Union, although Sandle (DeMonfort Univ.) reviews some contemporary leftovers like China, Cuba, and North Korea. As far as it goes, the author fulfills his purpose, relating the story of communism in clear, precise, attractive prose. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers and all college libraries. A. Ezergailis Ithaca College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"By looking at radical millenarian movements of the Middle Ages and the English Civil War, Mark Sandle explains how communism became a mass movement seeking to overturn capitalism and replace it with a society of equality, justice, harmony and cooperation." - Times Higher Education
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Summaries
Long Description
Why did communism grow so quickly? Why did it spread to turn almost half of the world red by the mid-1970s? What impact did it have upon capitalism and capitalist society? Communism is a concise introduction to one of the most important and influential movements of the 20th century. it shows how the modern communist movement emerged out of radical millenarian movements of the Middle Ages And The English Civil War, becoming a mass movement of industrial society, seeking to overturn capitalism and replace it with a society of equality, justice, harmony and co-operation. it traces the growth of modern communism from its beginnings in the early nineteenth century to its position of global power at the end of the Second World War. Mark Sandle investigates the ultimate failure of communism as a political ideology, and concludes by asking how far the historical record of communism has been used to conceal the historical record of capitalism. Ideal for courses in both History and Politics.
Main Description
Communism is a concise introduction to one of the most important and influential movements of the 20th century. It explores the history of communism: how it emerged, why it rose to world-wide prominence, and the reasons for its decline and fall.
Back Cover Copy
Communism is a concise introduction to one of the most important and influential movements of the 20th century.It explores the history of communism: how it emerged, why it rose to become one of the most influential political movements of the twentieth century and the reasons for its decline and fall. In this new volume in the Seminar Studies series, Professor Mark Sandle shows how the modern conception of communism emerged out of radical millenarian movements in the Middle Ages and the English Civil War, becoming a mass movement of industrial society that sought to overturn capitalism and replace it with a society founded on equality, justice, harmony and co-operation. He goes on to trace the growth of modern communism from its beginnings in the early nineteenth century to the peak of its global power at the end of the Second World War. This comprehensive new history investigates: how communism operated in practice the reasons for the ultimate failure of communism both as political ideology and as political movement. how far the failings of communism has been used to conceal the failings of capitalism. This book covers communism across time and across continents and contains a selection of key documents, maps and images. It is ideal for courses in both history and politics, and for anyone wishing to learn more about a movement which is central to our understanding of the 20th century world. Mark Sandle is Professor of History at the King's University College, in Edmonton, Alberta. He previously worked in the UK. He has published and written widely on Russian and Soviet history including Gorbachev (2008) and A Short History of Soviet Socialism (1999).
Bowker Data Service Summary
Why did communism grow so quickly? Why did it spread to turn almost half of the world red by the mid-1970s? What impact did it have upon capitalism and capitalist society? 'Communism' is a concise introduction to one of the most important and influential movements of the 20th century.
Table of Contents
Author's acknowledgementsp. x
Publisher's acknowledgementsp. xi
Chronologyp. xii
Who's whop. xx
Glossaryp. xxx
Mapsp. xxxv
Analysis
Introductionp. 3
What is Communism?p. 3
Communism: The Early Yearsp. 6
Conclusionp. 14
The Rise Of 'Modern' Communismp. 16
Introductionp. 16
The Emergence of Communism and Socialism after 1789p. 17
1848: Revolution and the Communist Manifestop. 20
Marx and Engels on Socialism and Communismp. 23
The Evolution of the Communist Movement 1850-1915p. 27
Conclusion: Communism Before Powerp. 32
Communism In The USSR: The Early Years 1917-53p. 34
Introductionp. 34
The Bolshevik Understanding of Communismp. 35
Exporting Communism: Comintern and the Third Internationalp. 40
Building Communism: Politics, Economics, Society in die USSR 1917-53p. 43
Conclusionp. 52
The Rise Of Global Communism 1945-82p. 54
Introductionp. 54
'Communisms' in Eastern Europep. 54
Red Star in the East: Chinap. 60
Communism in Asia: Nationalism, Communism and Anti-colonialismp. 65
Cuba and Latin Americap. 67
Africap. 68
Communism in the Developed Worldp. 70
Conclusion: Communism Across the Globe 1945-82p. 77
Living Under/With/For Communismp. 78
The Ideology/Reality Gapp. 78
Material Lifep. 79
Housingp. 80
Workp. 82
Healthp. 83
Fertility and Contraceptionp. 85
Consumptionp. 86
Equality and Inequalityp. 87
Education, Upbringing, Spiritualityp. 89
Harmony?p. 94
Living between Dissent and Support: The Conditional Loyalty of Communist Citizensp. 95
The Decline And Fall Of Communism 1953-91p. 97
Introductionp. 97
The Crisis of Faith 1953-91p. 97
The Crisis of the Communist System 1953-91p. 105
The End is Nigh!p. 111
Conclusionp. 115
Conclusionp. 117
Why did Communism Fall/Collapse/Get Overthrown? Mind the Gap!p. 117
How will History Judge Communism?p. 121
What is the Future for Communism?p. 124
Documentsp. 127
Acts 4: 32-35p. 128
Gracchus Babeuf and the Conspiracy of Equals, 1796p. 128
Manifesto of the Communist Party, 1848p. 129
Draft of a Communist Confession of Faith, 1847p. 130
The German Ideology Part I, 1845-46p. 131
Critique of the Gotha Programme, 1875p. 131
What is to be done?, 1902p. 132
The State and Revolution, 1917p. 133
The ABC of Communism, 1920p. 134
Communism and the Family, 1920p. 136
The Platform of the Communist International, 1919p. 138
The Tasks of Business Executives, 1931p. 139
Workers Manage Factories in Yugoslavia, 1950p. 140
The Demagogy of Soviet Revisionists Cannot Conceal Their Traitorous Countenance, 1969p. 141
Janos Kadar: On a National Communist Party, 1956p. 142
Demands of a Workers' Council, 1956p. 144
Mao Zedong: The Little Red Bookp. 144
Decision Concerning the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, 1966p. 146
Deng Xiaoping: The Necessity of Upholding the Four Cardinal Principles in the Drive for the Four Modernizations, 1979p. 147
Kim II Sung: Answers to Journalists' Questions, 1971p. 148
Manifesto of the South Viet Nam National Liberation Front, 1961p. 149
Life in the Bureaus of the Khmer Rouge, 1972-73p. 150
L'Unita Interview with Fidel Castro: The Nature of Cuban Socialism, 1961p. 151
Che Guevara: The Individual and Socialism, 1965p. 153
Programme of the South African Communist Partyp. 154
The Arusha Declaration, 1967p. 155
The British Road to Socialism, 1951p. 156
Manuel Azc√°rate: What is Eurocommunism?p. 157
The Secret Speech, 1956p. 159
The Action Programme of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia, 1968p. 160
Appeal for a Gradual Democratization, 1970p. 162
Solidarity's Programme: Basic Values, 1981p. 163
Perestroiha, 1987p. 164
Vaclav Havel: The Declaration of the Civic Forum, 1989p. 165
The Wall Poster Movement, 1979p. 167
Selected Tables and Statisticsp. 168
Further Readingp. 171
Referencep. 176
Indexp. 181
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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